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Behavioral Healthcare Education In-Person Courses

Training Locations

Onsite trainings are held at two convenient locations in Pennsylvania:

  • Grantville (Harrisburg/Hershey area)
    Holiday Inn Grantville
    604 Station Road
    Grantville, PA 17028
  • Philadelphia – Drexel Queen Lane Campus
    2900 West Queen Lane
    Philadelphia, PA 19129

Grantville Trainings          Philadelphia Trainings

Cancellations and Refunds

For possible weather cancellations, please call toll free 877.243.3033 after 6:30 a.m. the day of the training to confirm either cancellation or presentation of the course. If you must cancel your attendance, please call. Keep in mind that attendance will be electronically tracked and if you register for a course that you do not attend and do not cancel prior to the offering, your future registration may be blocked.

If you need to cancel your attendance at a course, please notify us within 24 hours of the training by calling 877.243.3033 or emailing bheweb@drexel.edu. We will credit your account for a future trainings. Refunds will not be made for any trainings (virtual or in person). Accounts will be credited for future training interests.

Same-Day Registration

We will no longer allow walk-in/onsite registration.

Grantville (Harrisburg/Hershey Area) Trainings

March 7, 2024, 1-4:15 p.m.
TR564 – Engagement: The Biggest Predictor of Success

Training fee: $27
Location: Holiday Inn Grantville
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, C-DBT

Research clearly demonstrates that the single biggest predictor of therapeutic success is the strength of the clinical relationship. The helper’s ongoing focus on engagement is central to this alliance. Awareness of the importance of engagement, however, does not mitigate the myriad obstacles that interfere with developing and maintaining rapport. This course will define the concept of engagement and highlight its significance in clinical settings. Additionally, barriers will be discussed from the practitioner’s perspective. Strategies will also be provided to assist helpers in improving engagement with those they serve.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Describe engagement as a primary factor of importance in clinical outcomes.
  • Identify at least three barriers to engagement.
  • List several strategies to enhance engagement.

CE Credits:
APA-3, CPRP-3, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3, NBCC-3, PA Act48-3, PCB-3, PSNA-3, IACET-.3

Register for the course
 

March 8, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR566 – The BHE Toolkit 2: Specific Practices for the Art of Helping People With Anxiety

Training fee: $45
Location: Holiday Inn Grantville
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, C-DBT

This course focuses on specific interventions of use to the professional helper when providing therapeutic services in behavioral healthcare. The aim of this workshop is to add to the helper’s “bag of tricks” or “toolkit” pertaining to assisting people with anxiety. Participants engage in didactic and experiential learning related to several anxiety-specific interventions. Participants also dialogue in small groups to share creative and effective interventions they have used in their various practice settings.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the general purposes of interventions.
  • Discuss having a sound rationale for using various techniques.
  • Describe the benefits associated with each strategy.
  • Outline the drawbacks and barriers to using selected interventions.
  • Implement each intervention as relevant to one’s own professional practice.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

May 1, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR256 – Therapeutic Dynamics: Becoming a More Effective Helper

Training fee: $45
Location: Holiday Inn Grantville
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, C-DBT

Research in our field is constantly evolving (and often contradictory) in terms of what practices are most effective. However, there are a variety of factors that have been consistently shown to contribute to positive clinical outcomes. This course will address the ingredients of interpersonal dynamics, indispensable attitudes and related skills that contribute to a recipe for successful helping relationships. This interactive training will delve into several essential therapeutic variables, including empathy, acceptance, hope, focus and evocation. Additionally, attendees will be encouraged to examine specific ways to improve their ability to be a difference-maker as a helper.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss at least five challenges of the therapeutic process, from both the client and helper perspective.
  • Examine essential attitudes involved in developing healing alliances.
  • Identify several useful skills that can enhance therapeutic outcomes.
  • Explain various methods of improving one’s expertise as a behavioral healthcare provider.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

May 2, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR172 – Boys Don’t Cry: Examining Trauma in Men

Training fee: $45
Location: Holiday Inn Grantville
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, C-DBT

Trauma can be viewed as an experience that can sever connections among the family, the community and the self. Although there are similarities between men and women in their experience of trauma and subsequent recovery processes, there are also substantial differences, in part due to gender role expectations. The very definition of “manhood” is often in direct conflict with the experience of being a victim, leaving males* to experience a wide range of conflicting emotions, and uncertainty as to how to manage them effectively. As a result, males who have experienced trauma tend to deal with these emotions with all-or-nothing, maladaptive coping responses, including substance use. This course will also briefly explore various aspects of a trauma-specific group treatment model for men (M-TREM), which addresses many areas including: messages about manhood, the impact of trauma, coping skills and acceptance.

*The use of the word “males” in this course may refer to any combination of boys, adolescents, men, older men or those socialized as men.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Examine several components of typical “manhood” schemas in our society. 
  • Discuss the types of trauma more commonly experienced by males.
  • Describe at least five ways in which a traumatic experience may affect men differently than women.
  • List at least five maladaptive coping responses to traumatic events often seen in men.
  • Explore the three broad elements of the M-TREM model of group treatment for men with histories of trauma.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

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Philadelphia Trainings

March 20, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR537 – Stigma and Mental Illness: Recovering an Identity Spoiler

Training fee: $45
Location: Drexel Queen Lane Campus
Instructor: Karin C. Gladney, PhD, CAADC

Recovery is a complex process of adjusting personal attitudes, shifting beliefs in self, and restoring or developing a positive and meaningful identity apart from one’s condition. People living with mental illnesses identify stigma as a major factor that impacts self-esteem, self-efficacy and one’s sense of meaning. This loss of ego, confidence and self-control derived from stigma leads to a sense of ‘spoiled identity’ [Goffman, 1963] and impedes seeking and participating in timely managements. According to the American Psychiatric Association, despite the active anti-stigma campaigns for mental illness, it is still rampant today. This training examines the impact of stigma on self-concept, social relationships, community involvement and recovery processes for psychiatric health and well-being of individuals with mental illness.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Examine the prevalence and power of stigma among individuals living with serious mental illnesses.
  • Discuss how stigma develops, is internalized and sustained, and interacts with other psychological and behavioral processes.
  • Explain how the cycle of shame, stigma and discrimination impedes timely help-seeking, belief, access and engagement in treatments and supports.
  • Identify interventions/practices evidenced to reduce internalized stigma, address other indices of psychosocial functioning, and improve personal, service and social outcomes.
  • Design an empowering “righteous indignation” approach to address injustices and break the bonds of stigma.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

April 3, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR595 – Mindfulness in Life and Practice

Training fee: $45
Location: Drexel Queen Lane Campus
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Mindfulness, rooted in Eastern tradition, is increasingly accepted and employed in personal and professional practice. Empirically supported for diverse application to many physical and psychological conditions, mindfulness is a welcomed addition to the practitioner’s “toolkit.” In this course, the history, core concepts and practices of mindfulness will be outlined. Participants will actively engage in mindfulness exercises and will be encouraged to incorporate these practices into their personal and professional lives.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the core concepts of mindfulness.
  • Describe how reactivity to stress may impair emotional and physical wellbeing.
  • Demonstrate understanding of mindfulness through participation in practice sessions.
  • Identify appropriate mindfulness practices for individuals with specific disorders.
  • Integrate mindfulness concepts and exercises into life and professional practice.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

April 16, 2024, 1-4:15 p.m.
TR564 – Engagement: The Biggest Predictor of Success

Training fee: $27
Location: Drexel Queen Lane Campus
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, C-DBT

Research clearly demonstrates that the single biggest predictor of therapeutic success is the strength of the clinical relationship. The helper’s ongoing focus on engagement is central to this alliance. Awareness of the importance of engagement, however, does not mitigate the myriad obstacles that interfere with developing and maintaining rapport. This course will define the concept of engagement and highlight its significance in clinical settings. Additionally, barriers will be discussed from the practitioner’s perspective. Strategies will also be provided to assist helpers in improving engagement with those they serve.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Describe engagement as a primary factor of importance in clinical outcomes.
  • Identify at least three barriers to engagement.
  • List several strategies to enhance engagement.

CE Credits:
APA-3, CPRP-3, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3, NBCC-3, PA Act48-3, PCB-3, PSNA-3, IACET-.3

Register for the course
 

May 8, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR803 – Healing the Whole: Culturally Responsive Care for Racial Trauma

Training fee: $45
Location: Drexel Queen Lane Campus
Instructor: Karin C. Gladney, PhD, CAADC

This course is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of race-related traumatic stress, which refers to the psychological impact of exposure to racial discrimination, racism and prejudice. The course will provide an overview of the historical and social context of racism, the manifestations of racism in contemporary society and the ways in which racism can impact an individual's mental health.

The course will cover the key concepts and theories related to race-related traumatic stress, including the impact of chronic and acute stress on the body, the role of cognitive and emotional processes in coping with racism, and the intersectionality of racism with other forms of oppression. Participants will also learn about the assessment and diagnosis of race-related traumatic stress, as well as evidence-based interventions for addressing this type of trauma.

Overall, this course will provide participants with a comprehensive understanding of the impact of racism on mental health and equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to support individuals who have experienced race-related traumatic stress.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Critically reflect on personal biases and assumptions related to race, racism and privilege, and how they may impact one's professional practice.
  • Develop an understanding of the historical and social context of racism and its impact on mental health.
  • Identify and describe the different manifestations of racism and discrimination in contemporary society, including microaggressions, institutional racism and internalized racism.
  • Discuss the physiological and psychological effects of chronic and acute stress on the body, particularly as they relate to experiences of racism and discrimination, as well as the cognitive and emotional processes in coping with racism and discrimination, including the impact of trauma on one's sense of self and identity.
  • Understand the challenges associated with assessing and diagnosing race-related stress, particularly within diverse communities.
  • Develop knowledge of evidence-based interventions and strategies for creating culturally sensitive and trauma-informed interventions for addressing race-related trauma, including trauma-informed care, mindfulness-based interventions and cognitive-behavioral therapy stress, with an emphasis on empowering individuals and communities.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

May 30, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR546 – The Dark Triad: Narcissistic, Antisocial and Psychopathic Personality Structures

Training fee: $45
Location: Drexel Queen Lane Campus
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

The dark triad of personality is a constellation of three socially aversive personality traits: narcissism, psychopathy and Machiavellianism. These personality patterns share commonalities, including grandiosity, self-promotion, entitlement, impulsivity, emotional coldness and aggression. However, there are vast differences in the etiology, manifestation and adaptivity of individuals with clinical and sub-clinical presentations. This course explores the malevolent side of human nature and provides strategies to improve assessment and treatment, and work more effectively with those presenting these personality structures.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Define the clinical and sub-clinical personality structures associated with the dark triad.
  • Describe the etiology of narcissistic, psychopathic and antisocial personalities.
  • Identify tools used to assess narcissism, antisocial and psychopathic personalities.
  • Evaluate treatment approaches for narcissistic and antisocial personality disorders.
  • Discuss challenges and best practices in working with clients with dark personality structures.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

June 6, 2024, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR285 – Current Approaches to Working With Trauma in Families

Training fee: $45
Location: Drexel Queen Lane Campus
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, C-DBT

The impact on the entire family when any member experiences trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often overlooked. This course examines the range of responses in family members, the concept and reality of secondary trauma, and current approaches for treatment and related interventions for family members.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish between family therapy and family psychoeducation in their efficacy for helping family members.
  • Examine cultural factors in a family’s response to trauma.
  • Discuss the manifestations of secondary trauma in family members.
  • Describe risk factors for co-occurring disorders such as substance-related disorders.
  • Use information about current effective intervention approaches with families.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

June 20, 2024, 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
TR802 – Prolonged Grief Disorder: Considerations for Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment

Training fee: $27
Location: Drexel Queen Lane Campus
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Grief is a complex and universal human experience, but for some, it can develop into a debilitating and prolonged condition known as prolonged grief disorder (PGD). An estimated 7-10% of bereaved adults and approximately 5-10% of children and adolescents will experience persistent symptoms of prolonged grief disorder, which extend beyond what is considered the normal course of mourning.

The addition of PGD to the Trauma and Stressor-Related Disorders chapter of the DSM-5-TR has sparked controversy and debate about the pathologizing of grief. In this workshop, we will review the latest research on grief theory to help clinicians differentiate between “normal” and pathological forms of grief.

Attendees will gain a comprehensive understanding of PGD, including its diagnostic criteria, prevalence, etiology and risk factors. This course will provide practical skills in assessing and managing PGD, including evidence-based assessment tools and treatment approaches designed for working with those struggling with severe and prolonged grief reactions.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Describe prolonged grief disorder (PGD), including symptoms, prevalence, diagnostic criteria and potential risk factors.
  • Discuss at least two tools to assess and diagnose those with PGD using a culturally sensitive and empathic approach.
  • Identify several evidence-based interventions to help individuals with PGD manage symptoms and improve overall functioning.

CE Credits:
APA-3, CPRP-3, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3, NBCC-3, PA Act48-3, PCB-3, PSNA-3, IACET-.3

Register for the course
 

*These courses are part of the 10-course Trauma Series.

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