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Student life at the College of Medicine extends well beyond the classroom. From student groups to social events, we encourage students to get involved, stay healthy and explore our great city of Philadelphia. These out-of-classroom activities help build a level of comradery that's unique to Drexel students and makes the College of Medicine such a special place to complete your medical or graduate education.

Student Life News

Student Organization Brings First-Gen Medical Students Together

A desire to help others, a love of learning, and skills like self-reliance and adaptability have gotten Daniyal Dar where he is today. Dar said he gained those skills along the path to medical school, navigating secondary education as a first-generation college student. Read more.

MD Students Form Task Force to Collect PPE

The COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic has changed the routines of daily life for many, but Drexel University College of Medicine students are working together – and collaborating with new student groups – to make the best of the difficult situation. Read more.

Health Outreach Project: Student-Run Clinics Care for Vulnerable Communities

The Health Outreach Project offers free health services to people in poor and socially vulnerable communities through five weekly clinics and a dozen other programs, while training a corps of future physicians committed to patient-centered, culturally sensitive practice. Read more.

Drexel Medical Students Share Friendship, Stem-Cell-Donation Bond

John McCormick and Ryan Rothman, both second-year medical students in Drexel University’s College of Medicine, share a medical tie — McCormick was saved by a stem cell donation, and Rothman recently donated his stem cells to save someone else. Read more.

Patients Teach Students

Drexel medical students learn how to understand and communicate with people with complex disabilities from the best possible teachers — people living with disabilities themselves. Their instructors are residents of Inglis House, a specialty nursing care facility that provides long-term residential care for adults with physical disabilities, including multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury and stroke.

 
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