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   Congratulations Class of 2022 Graduates!

 

Friday, May 13
9 a.m. EDT
The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

The College of Medicine is planning an in-person graduation ceremony for the Class of 2022 on Friday, May 13 at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. The ceremony will include medical students and students in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies.

The number of invited guests will be dependent upon the City of Philadelphia’s COVID-19 capacity restrictions. The College is working to ensure a safe and meaningful program for our graduating students and must adhere to health and safety regulations at the venue.

Please join in celebrating the Class of 2022 by tuning in to the ceremony, which will be broadcast live on our YouTube channel on Friday, May 13, at 9 a.m. EDT from the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts.

COVID 19 – At the present time the Kimmel Center is requiring that all students, faculty, staff and guests be fully vaccinated. You will be required to wear a mask during the ceremony. Any change to this protocol will be determined by the Kimmel Center Management and communicated by the Office of Student Affairs. View Kimmel Center Vaccine and Mask Requirements

Proof of Vaccine Requirement All guests 5 years of age or older will be required to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination for entry into all Kimmel Cultural Campus venues. Adults 18+ will be required to show photo identification with their vaccination proof.

Mask Enforcement All patrons are required to wear masks inside the venue at all times (except when consuming food or beverage). Speakers will be permitted to remove their masks when in place at the podium. Students will be permitted to remove their mask as they walk across the stage. Prolonged periods of mask removal are not permitted. 

 

 

About the Commencement Ceremony

 

  Download 2022 Commencement Program

View Commencement Schedule – 9 a.m. EDT

  • Brass Prelude:
    Selected Works
    Symphony in C
  • Academic Procession:
    Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1
    Edward Elgar
    Symphony in C
  • National Anthem:
    Star-Spangled Banner
    Francis Scott Key
    Symphony in C
  • Opening Remarks:
    Donna M. Russo, PhD, HU ’89
    William Maul Measey Chair in Medical Education
    Interim Vice Dean for Educational Affairs
    Senior Associate Dean for Curriculum
    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
  • Remarks by the Dean:
    Charles B. Cairns, MD
    Walter H. and Lenore Annenberg Dean, College of Medicine
    Senior Vice President of Medical Affairs, Drexel University
    Professor of Emergency Medicine
  • Welcome:
    John Fry
    President, Drexel University
  • Greetings:
    Stanley W. Silverman
    Vice Chair, Drexel University Board of Trustees
  • Recognition of Academic and Teaching Awards:
    Charles B. Cairns
  • Citation of Fifty-Year Graduates 1972-2022:
    Charles B. Cairns
  • Conferring of Posthumous Honorary Degree:
    John Fry
    Charles B. Cairns
     
    Doctor of Humane Letters
    Lynn H. Yeakel
    Director, Institute for Women’s Health and Leadership
    Betty A. Cohen Chair in Women’s Health
  • Introduction of Speaker:
    John Fry
  • Commencement Address:
    Sarah S. Long, MD
  • Charge to the Graduates:
    Charles B. Cairns
  • Conferring of Graduate Degrees:
    John Fry
     
    Elisabeth J. Van Bockstaele, PhD
    Founding Dean, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies
    Chief Strategy Officer
    Senior Vice President for Graduate and Online Education
    Dean, Graduate College
    Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology
     
    Jed Shumsky, PhD
    Senior Associate Dean of Educational and Academic Affairs
    Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy
  • Investiture:
    Anita Gaurnier-Hausser, PhD
    Director, Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Program
    Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies
     
    Fred Krebs, PhD
    Director, Master of Science in Infectious Disease Program
    Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
     
    Paul McGonigle, PhD
    Director, Division of Interdisciplinary and Career-Oriented Programs
    Director, Drug Discovery and Development Program
    Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology
     
    Erin Vogelsong, MS
    Director, Master of Laboratory Animal Science Program
    Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies
  • Administration of the Graduate Student Oath:
    Elisabeth J. Van Bockstaele
  • Conferring of the Doctor of Medicine Degrees:
    John Fry
     
    Charles B. Cairns
     
    Donna M. Russo
     
    Seema Baranwal, MD
    Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs
    Associate Professor of Medicine
     
    Amy C. Fuchs, MD
    Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Career Advising
    Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Investiture:
    Amy S. Baranoski, MD ’03, MSc
    Assistant Dean, Phase One Curriculum
    Associate Professor of Medicine
     
    Diane B. Gottlieb, MD, MCP ’88
    Director, Medical Student Mental Health
    Associate Professor of Psychiatry
     
    Cheryl A. Hanau, MD
    Professor and Richard Shuman, MD, Chair of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    Interim Associate Dean of Admissions
     
    James B. Reilly, MD, MS
    Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, Allegheny Programs
    Associate Professor of Medicine
     
    Todd I. Strochlic, VMD, PhD
    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
     
    Anh-Thu Vu, MD
    Assistant Professor of Neurology
  • Administration of the Physician’s Pledge:
    Nathalie S. May, MD
    Associate Professor of Medicine
  • Military Oath for MD Officers:
    Ayman Bodair, MD ’19
    Captain, Medical Corps, United States Army
  • Induction into the Alumni Association:
    Edward Siegel, MD ’12, MBA
    President-Elect, Alumni Association
  • Graduate Remarks:
    Kara Melissa Jacobs, MD
    Class of 2022
  • Farewell:
    Seema Baranwal
  • Recessional:
    The Earle of Oxford’s March
    William Byrd/arr. Douglas Nelson
     
    Crown Imperial
    William Walton/arr. Douglas Nelson
    Symphony in C
  • Macebearer:
    Dennis M. DePace, PhD
    Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy
  • Faculty Marshals:
    Esther Chernak, MD, MPH
    Associate Professor of Medicine
     
    Stacy Ellen, DO
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
     
    Dana C. Farabaugh, MD ’03
    Associate Dean for Clinical Education
    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
     
    Nicholas C. Kuzma, MD ’10
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
     
    Karen Restifo, MD, JD
    Regional Vice Dean, College of Medicine at Tower Health
    Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine
     
    Michael M. White, PhD, MBA
    Vice Chair for Education and Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology
  • Student Marshals: Alexander Becsey
    Javier “Alex” Chavez
    Hannah Lee
    Chung Heng Liu
    Jasmine Lu
    Luke McCutcheon
    Brendon Ngo
    Vanelle Nouboussi
    Kaustav Patra
    Alexandra Scanameo
    Marie Tan
    Shane Tripp

Processional/Hooding/Recessional Instructions

PROCESSIONAL INSTRUCTIONS

From the Perelman Theater, all graduates will process to Verizon Hall (main auditorium) in one line led by Faculty and Student Marshals. Graduates will be seated for the line-up in alphabetical order. It is extremely important that you stay in line and in order during the procession into Verizon Hall. PLEASE FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS OF THE STUDENT MARSHALS.

Once all graduates are in place, the Macebearer will process towards the stage. When the macebearer has reached the location on stage, the processional will begin. Faculty and Student Marshals will lead the graduates across the stage, in two lines, and descend the stairs into the graduate seating area in Verizon Hall where Student Marshals will seat graduates. Graduates will process with their academic hood draped over their left arm. We will demonstrate prior to the ceremony how the hood should be folded and carried. Please make sure your hood is unbuttoned.

CONFERRING OF DEGREE AND HOODING INSTRUCTIONS

Faculty Marshals will guide you from your row to the stage for the conferring of degrees. Each candidate will ascend the steps to receive their diploma, carrying their hood over their left arm as demonstrated. The graduate will accept the diploma with their left hand, leaving their right hand free to shake hands with the Deans and President. The graduate will then proceed to the hooding platform and stop directly in front of the farthest available medical school Faculty Hooder. The hooder will take the hood from the graduate’s left arm, then the graduate will turn facing the audience, and remove their cap with the right hand. The hooder slips the hood over the candidate's head. (If you are tall, please help and bend at the knees a bit.) The graduate then replaces the cap, turns to shake hands with the hooder, moves to the exit set of stairs and then returns to their seat row.

** So that the conferring of degrees runs smoothly, please do not stop to shake hands/hug all the hooders. Please go to the farthest available hooder, do not wait for a particular faculty member to hood you.

PLEASE WATCH YOUR GOWN AS YOU DESCEND THE STEPS.

RECESSIONAL INSTRUCTIONS

The graduates will process out of Verizon Hall in two lines. Student Marshals will direct the recessional.

About Our Speaker – Sarah S. Long, MD

Sarah S. Long, MD

After receiving her medical degree from the Sidney Kimmel Medical College (then Jefferson Medical College), Sarah S. Long, MD, completed pediatric residency and fellowship training in infectious diseases at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and one year in research as a National Institutes of Health trainee at Temple University. She took her first job in 1975, as chief of infectious diseases at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, where she has spent her career.

She is the founding and current chief editor of the textbook Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Disease (in its 6th edition) and an associate editor of The Journal of Pediatrics. She also was an associate editor for five editions of the Red Book Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases (the pediatrician’s vaccine “bible”) of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She has chaired the program committee for annual scientific meetings of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

Dr. Long has been honored repeatedly with medical student Golden Apples, house staff teaching awards, the all-university Great Teacher’s Award at Temple University, the Distinguished Service Award as well as the Distinguished Physician Award of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, an award for Lifetime Contribution to Infectious Diseases Education by the Section on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Clinical Teaching Award from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (an internist-dominated subspecialist society). In 2015, she received the Drexel University all-university Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching and in 2019 was awarded the Drexel University College of Medicine Dean’s Heritage Medal.

In 2021, Dr. Long was invited to deliver The Great Teacher’s Lecture at the National Institutes of Health and was named the alumnus of the year of the Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. She has been named more than 25 times as Top Doctor in Philadelphia magazine and multiple times as among the top 5% of America’s most honored professionals. To date, Dr. Long has mentored 16 fellows in pediatric infectious diseases, as well as more than 1,000 residents and students in pediatrics. The Philadelphia Mural Arts Program included Dr. Long’s portrait, among storied St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children dignitaries Drs. W.E. Nelson and A. M. DiGeorge, on an edifice near the hospital in recognition of her service to north Philadelphia’s children and her contribution to the broad field of Pediatrics.

Dr. Long's principal areas of investigation are vaccine-preventable diseases and management of common infectious diseases in children. She has played key roles in molding vaccine policy nationally over decades, advising on vaccine licensure as a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. Currently she is a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, making national policy for use of vaccines. She has made more than 400 contributions to the medical literature, has given an average of more than 30 lectures nationally and internationally annually for more than three decades, and has performed more than 85 honorary lectureships and visiting professorships.

Despite national leadership and teaching roles, Dr. Long has prioritized an intensive schedule of clinical consultative care, to bring the best possible medical decisions to underprivileged children in North Philadelphia. She maintains that her most cherished moments are at the bedside of a child — with a parent, medical student, resident and fellow — all learning together.

Graduate Student Oath

I will represent my profession honorably by conducting myself and my professional endeavors in a manner that is above reproach. I pledge never to allow financial gain or ambition to cloud my judgment. I will pursue truth and create knowledge for the greater good, but never to the detriment of others. I will maintain scientific integrity in all my work. I will acknowledge and honor the contributions of those who have preceded me and will commit myself to lifelong learning. I will show compassion, embrace diversity and uphold excellence so that I become a worthy role model deserving of respect by all.

Physician's Pledge – World Medical Association Declaration of Geneva

The Physician's Pledge:

AS A MEMBER OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION

I SOLEMNLY PLEDGE to dedicate my life to the service of humanity;

THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF MY PATIENT will be my first consideration;

I WILL RESPECT the autonomy and dignity of my patient;

I WILL MAINTAIN the utmost respect for human life;

I WILL NOT PERMIT considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;

I WILL RESPECT the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;

I WILL PRACTICE my profession with conscience and dignity and in accordance with good medical practice;

I WILL FOSTER the honor and noble traditions of the medical profession;

I WILL GIVE to my teachers, colleagues and students the respect and gratitude that is their due;

I WILL SHARE my medical knowledge for the benefit of the patient and the advancement of healthcare;

I WILL ATTEND TO my own health, well-being and abilities in order to provide care of the highest standard;

I WILL NOT USE my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;

I MAKE THESE PROMISES solemnly, freely and upon my honor.

©2017 World Medical Association

The Commencement Tradition

A tradition that reaches back nearly a thousand years, commencement symbolizes not so much the culmination of the years of effort on the part of both students and teachers, but rather the beginning—the commencement—of a productive social and professional life, and a life of continued learning.

The first university, the University of Bologna, was founded in Italy in 1162 and offered specialized education in the major professional fields of the medieval world: law, medicine, government and theology—areas that would dominate European and American higher education until the 20th century.

From Bologna, the concept of university education spread throughout Europe and later to the New World. The pageantry and symbolism of commencement are typified by the cap and gown, which in their original forms were simply the everyday attire of the medieval scholar. The additions of the centuries have made them what they are today.

The academic costume has three basic parts: the cap, the gown and the hood. Three factors must be taken into consideration—the degree (bachelor, master, doctor); the branch of knowledge (nursing, medicine, etc.); and the university by which the degree is granted. The bachelor's gown is black, has long sleeves and is worn closed. The master's gown is black but has short sleeves and a crescent cut at the sleeve end. Some are open at the wrist; others have a slit in the upper part of the sleeve. The doctor's gown is often black, preferably silk, with full, round sleeves that are barred in either black velvet or velvet of the color used in the hood to designate the branch of learning.

Many American universities, as well as British ones, now have gowns of characteristic color for doctoral graduates. For instance, a graduate of Harvard University may wear a crimson gown, a New York University graduate a violet gown, and a University of Pennsylvania graduate a gown of red and blue. The shape and size of the American hood mark the degree of the wearer. The lining of the hood is indicative of the institution granting the degree and is usually the official color or colors of the school. If two colors are used, one is generally arranged as a chevron upon the other. The bachelor's hood is three feet long, the master's three-and-a-half feet long, and the doctor's four feet long. Bachelor of Science and Master of Science candidates wear sun-gold hoods; Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts candidates white hoods. Doctor of Philosophy candidates wear blue hoods. Doctor of Medicine candidates wear green hoods. Candidates with annotated degrees may wear hoods of other colors, such as apricot (Bachelor and Master of Science in Nursing), teal (Master of Physical Therapy), and blue with white trim (Master of Arts, Creative Arts in Therapy), to name a few.

Caps are traditionally black with a long tassel fastened to the mid-point. A doctor's cap may have a tassel of gold thread. The tassel is worn on the right side until a degree has been conferred; it is then worn on the left. Commencement begins and ends with the academic procession, led by the chief marshal carrying the mace. The mace traces its origins to the Roman fasces, a bundle of rods bound together around an ax with the blade projecting, which was carried before magistrates as an emblem of authority. The ceremony officially begins with the placing of the mace before the graduates and ends when the chief marshal retrieves it and leads the recession. The color guard follows the marshal, with the candidates for degrees marching behind in reverse order of seniority—certificate, associate, and bachelor's first, master's next and doctoral third. The faculty follows, also proceeding in reverse order from assistant to full professor. The final division of the procession is the platform party, composed of academic deans, administrative officers, trustees, honorary degree recipients and the president.

Throughout their long and proud history, universities have retained and cherished strong ties to their ceremonial roots. The faculties and graduates have gloried in the rich imagery and colorful panoply associated with commencement, one of the oldest continuing rituals in the Western world.

History and Traditions of the University Mace

The mace was a medieval weapon intended to prevail over an armored adversary. As long-range weapons evolved, the mace became a ceremonial symbol denoting authority and was carried before a nobleman for protection, if necessary, from personal attack.

In academic processions, it has traditionally been carried by an academic officer of high standing. The selection of the officer to carry the mace may be governed by institutional tradition and may vary from ceremony to ceremony. The Drexel University mace is carried in the commencement procession to the stage, where it joins the maces of the College of Medicine's predecessor institutions. The Hahnemann mace was designed and carved by James Victor. The mace of the Medical College of Pennsylvania was designed by former dean Alton I. Sutnick, in conjunction with artist Richard Feldstein.

 
Drexel University College of Medicine Mace
 
Drexel University College of Medicine Mace 2017
 

 

 

Commencement - Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

 

MD Graduates – Perelman Theater

When should I arrive?
Report time 8:00 am– Sharp! Perelman Theater – The entrance to Perelman Theater is off the Main Lobby inside the Kimmel Center Drexel Staff and Student Volunteers in Drexel Commencement Badges will be available throughout the Kimmel Center to assist you and your guests upon arrival.

Do I need a ticket to enter?
No, graduates do not need a ticket to attend Commencement.

Where do I go when I get to the Kimmel Center?
You must check in at the Registration Table outside of Perelman upon your arrival. All graduates will receive a card with their name and seat assignment. IF YOU DO NOT REGISTER AND PICK UP YOUR CARD, YOU WILL BE CONSIDERED ABSENT AND YOUR NAME WILL NOT BE CALLED. Please do not bring any valuables into Perelman Theater—please leave them with family members or guests prior to arriving at Perelman Theater. For members of AOA and GHHS don’t forget your honor cords.

I have personal items with me (purse, jacket etc.). Can I bring it into Perelman with me?
NO– graduates may not leave any personal belongings in Perelman. We will not be returning to that space. Please leave any personal items with your family/friends before entering Perelman.

I never picked up my regalia/ I lost part of my regalia. What do I do?
If you have not picked it up yet, your regalia will be at registration. If you are missing any part of your regalia (tam, hood, tassel), a volunteer can help you. All graduates should check in/register before going into Perelman.

I don’t know how to put on my hood. What do I do?
Graduates should not be wearing their hoods at this time. You will be hooded on stage as part of the ceremony. Volunteers will be going around in Perelman showing graduates how to place their hoods on their arm.

I’m not registered, but I want to participate in Commencement. What do I do?
At the present time you must pre-register for this event.

I want to carry my child across stage when I’m hooded. What do I do?
Students are not permitted to carry their child on stage.

Where is the bathroom?
Volunteers and Kimmel Center staff can direct you to the nearest bathroom.

PhD and MS Graduates – SEI Innovation Studio

Download Full Instructions

Do I need a ticket to enter?
No, graduates do not need a ticket to attend Commencement.

Where do I go when I get to the Kimmel Center?
Graduates should go immediately to the check in table outside of SEI Innovation Studio, which is located on Level B of the Kimmel Center. If you do not check in, your name will not be called at Commencement.

I have personal items with me (purse, jacket etc.). Can I bring it into SEI Innovation Studio with me?
NO – graduates may not leave any personal belongings in SEI Innovation Studio. We will not be returning to that space. Please leave any personal items with your family/friends before entering SEI Innovation Studio.

I never picked up my regalia/ I lost part of my regalia. What do I do?
If you haven’t picked it up yet, your regalia will be at the check-in table, outside of SEI Innovation Studio. If you are missing any part of your regalia (cap, hood, tassel), please go to registration, and a volunteer can help you. All graduates should check in/register before going into SEI Innovation Studio.

I don’t know how to put on my hood. What do I do?
Graduates should not be wearing their hoods at this time. You will be hooded on stage as part of the ceremony. Volunteers will be going around in SEI Innovation Studio showing graduates how to place their hoods on their arm.

Can I keep my regalia?
Yes.

I’m not registered, but I want to participate in Commencement. What do I do?
At the present time you must pre-register for this event.

I want to carry my child across stage when I’m hooded. What do I do?
Students are not permitted to carry their child on stage.

Where is the bathroom? Volunteers and Kimmel Center staff can direct you to the nearest bathroom.

Faculty/Stage Participants/Faculty Awardees/Mentor Hooders – Rendell Room, 1st Tier

When should I arrive?
Please report to the robing location by 8:00 am sharp! As a reminder, the Center City area can get very busy this time of year. Please allow yourself extra time for travel so you arrive on time at the Kimmel Center. Staff will be on hand to assist you with robing and lining up for the academic procession. All members participating in the academic procession will be seated on stage. 

Where do I go when I get to the Kimmel Center?
MD faculty should report to the Rendell Room, located on the First Tier, one level up from the main entrance of the Kimmel Center. You may enter by the Broad Street entrance and use the elevator or the stairs on the left. Graduate School faculty should report to the SEI Innovation Center, located on the ground floor of the Kimmel Center, one level below Verizon Hall and the main lobby.

Do I need a ticket to enter?
You do not need a ticket to enter the Kimmel Center. Once inside, College of Medicine volunteers with Drexel Commencement Badges can direct you to the Rendell Room and SEI Innovation Center.

Do guests of Faculty Awardees need a ticket to enter?
Yes, please see staff in the Rendell Room. They will have tickets for the guests of faculty awardees.

Where do I pick up regalia?
Your regalia will be on your chair in the Rendell Room. If you are missing any part of your regalia (cap, hood, tassel), please let a volunteer know. Please note, all regalia must be returned immediately following the ceremony.

I have regalia, but it’s not on my chair. What do I do?
Some trustee and deans’ regalia is being brought to the Kimmel Center. All ordered regalia will be placed on the chairs in Rendell. Please ask one of the volunteers for help if you cannot find your regalia.

I’m not registered, but I want to participate in Commencement. What do I do?
At the present time you must pre-register for this event.

Where is the bathroom?
Volunteers and Kimmel Center staff can direct you to the nearest bathroom.

Guests – Verizon Hall

Download Full Instructions

Where do I sit, and what time can I enter Verizon Hall?
Tickets are assigned by tier, which is printed on your ticket. Ushers are present on each tier and will help you find a seat. Guests may enter Verizon Hall starting at 8:30am.

I have a child with me—do they need a ticket?
Any child over the age of 5 needs a ticket. If your child cannot comfortably sit on your lap without blocking the views of those behind you, they need their own seat.

I have a handicapped guest with me. When can we enter the theater?
Any handicapped guests will be seated prior to all other guests beginning at 8:15am. They should go to the level printed on their ticket. There is handicapped seating on all levels. Please direct guests to the Kimmel Center ushers for further instructions. Handicapped guests will be seated with one companion only.

I have tickets available under my name. Where do I pick them up?
If you were informed that you have tickets available for pick up, they will be in an envelope with your name on it at the Will Call Table in the lobby.

Where can I leave tickets for a friend?
You may leave any tickets for a friend at the Will Call Table in the lobby.

Where is the bathroom?
Volunteers and Kimmel Center staff can direct you to the nearest bathroom.

Event Parking

Parking is available for purchase (including handicap parking) underneath the Kimmel Center. There are several parking garages located near the Kimmel Center on Broad Street including the Symphony House Garage (440. S. Broad St.) and the Juniper and Locust Garage (1327 Locust St.) You may also use SpotHero to make a parking reservation in advance.

More FAQs will be added as we continue to finalize details for the Commencement ceremony.

 

 

 

Share Your Celebration on Social Media

 
We encourage graduates and their loved ones, as well as faculty and staff members, to use social media (#drexelmed2022) to share how they are celebrating commencement.

 
  DUCOM Facebook   DUCOM Instagram   DUCOM Twitter   DUCOM LinkedIn   DUCOM YouTube

 

 

 

Citation of College of Medicine Fifty-Year Graduates, 1972-2022

Hahnemann Medical College Class of 1972

George J. Amrom, MD
George R. Andrews, MD
Gregory M. Asnis, MD
Phyllis B. Baer, MD
Stephen D. Baer, MD
Thomas E. Baker, MD*
Clayton Barclay, Jr., MD
Roy E. Berkowitz, MD*
Poni S. Bishop, MD
Richard L. Bishop, MD
Roger A. Bitar, MD
Michael A. Bolognese, MD
William F. Boucher, Jr., MD
Robert M. Bronstein, MD
Robert J. Carpenter, III, MD
Joseph R. Carver, MD
Herbert O. Cherry, MD
Carl S. Citron, MD
Lawrence P. Clinton, MD
Leonard H. Cohen, MD
Joseph P. Coladonato, MD
Richard G. Coleman, MD
Henry G. Conroe, MD
Willard H. Cook, MD
Joseph M. Corvasce, MD
Edward H. Cottler, MD
Kenneth M. Delafrange, MD*
Bruce Demchick, MD
Marvin I. Dodek, MD
Alan I. Domsky, MD*
Peter D. Eisenberg, MD
Kenneth David Emkey, MD

John G. Enders, MD
Neil D. Fagen, MD
Anne Cusack Fallahnejad, MD
Carl R. Fischer, MD
Howard F. Floch, MD
James B. Gabroy, MD
Allen Gaisin, MD*
Esther Mascaro Gallagher, MD
John A. Gastaldo, MD*
Thomas D. Gindhart, MD*
Judith A. Gouldin, MD
Barry Paul Green, MD
Virginia Ettinger Hall, MD
Harry J. Hirsch, MD
Gary Edward Hirshberg, MD
Joseph F. Humenik, MD
Warren Israel, MD
Robert J. Joynes, MD
Louis C. Kandl, MD
Theodore T. Katz, MD
Helen H. Keith, MD
David P. Kelsen, MD
Howard O. Kerpen, MD
David W. Kistler, Jr., MD
Neil E. Klein, MD
Robert F. Lally, Jr., MD
Carl M. Levitsky, MD
Stephen Jay Losben, MD*
Ronald A. Lutz, MD
Michael J. Mandarino, MD
Holly Elizabeth Mayerson, MD
Michael J. McGirr, MD

Edward McLaughlin, MD*
John D. Melbourne, MD
Melvin P. Melnick, MD
John V. Mendola, MD
Gerald B. Miley, MD
Franklin C. Milgrim, MD
Karen K. Miura, MD
James W. Morgan, Jr., MD
Anthony F. Moscato, MD
Richard J. Murphy, MD
Frederick B. Myers, MD
Edward A. Nardell, MD
Thomas I. Nary, MD
Matthew E. Naythons, MD
Dennis H. Novack, MD
Robert F. Pendrak, MD
Alan J. Pusnick, MD Alan
Alan M. Radoff, MD
Leslie Mark Reiner, MD
Carl A. Restivo, Jr., MD
Richard A. Reutter, MD
Robert E. Rinaldi, MD
Michael C. Robinson, MD
Karl E. Robinson, MD
John R. Rosenberg, MD
Stanley A. Rubin, MD
Michael R. Rudnick, MD
Joel B. Sands, MD*
Barry J. Saul, MD
Jay Schamberg, II, MD
David J. Schraer, MD
C. Richard Scipione, MD

Hahnemann Medical College

Eleanor M. Seiler, MD
Harry O. Senekjian, MD
Robert S. Seto, MD
Eugene Rodman Shippen, III, MD
William Irving Sivitz, MD
James P. Slovak, MD*
Daniel J. Smuro, MD
Robert K. Spiegel, MD
Martin A. Steinfeld, MD
F. Bruce Tapper, MD*
Robert J. Teears, MD
Christopher W. Thomas, MD
David G. Tinkelman, MD
Gary Veith, MD
Robert E. Wagner, MD
Clifford J. Ward, MD
Frank J. Weirman, MD
Rhoda Sue Weisburg, MD
Eugene A. Zenone, MD
Francis J. Zonay, MD
William M. Zurhellen, MD

* deceased

Woman's Medical College Class of 1972

Trina Menden Anglin, MD
Anita Kaplan Bahn, MD*
Eva M. Balash-Deutsch, MD
Frances Ruth Batzer Baylson, MD
Meredith Ann Bennet, MD
Lee Anne Finkelstein Berry, MD*
Sheryl L. Buckley, MD
Olivia Capers, MD*
K. Niki Graham Cole, MD*
Carol A. Currier, MD
Nancy Stiles Curry, MD
Lynn Eleanor Moskowitz De Lisi, MD
Cheryl Beth Diamond, MD
Grace Baldwin Doherty, MD*
Paula Maguire Duncan, MD*
Carol Hughes Durfee, MD
Joan E. Enoch, MD
Frances L. Stewart Esposito, MD
Lois Lynn Estok, MD*
Cherie Suzanne Evans, MD*

Martha Barraclough Finn, MD
Judith Lynne Folkema, MD*
Donna Della Freedman, MD
Virginia Sahr Fuller, MD
Ann Gerace, MD
Judith M. Gilmore, MD
Lani F. B. Graham, MD
Linda Birkner Griska, MD
Bobbi Ann Chastain Hamilton, MD*
Judith K. Hart, MD
Vicki B. Hook, MD
Helen Meeks Horstmann, MD
Anne Mauks Koepke, MD
Wilma Krause-Brucker, MD
Jolanta Kulpa-Gubernat, MD
Barbara Ann Salago Lambert, MD
Joan Fluri Hackett Lundeen, MD*
Susan J. Maturlo, MD
Donna Lee Pruitt McCleary, MD
Catherine F. McCoy, MD*

Rose M. Miketta, MD
Rose Marie Mohr, MD
Kathleen Musser, MD
Paula Frank Nadell, MD
Joann Yaskin Nevyas, MD*
Linda A. Pape, MD
Anne Louise Splete Peters, MD
Judith Lynn Johnson Ramsdell, MD*
Jay W. Ripka, MD*
Linda Palone Roberts, MD
Victoria Jane Romeo, MD*
Louis F. Rose, DDS, MD
Judith Golomb Rose, MD
Barbara E. Hancock Rumberger, MD
Alice M. Savage, MD
Martin Schimmel, MD
Mary Ann Robertson Skidmore, MD
Hardy L. Sorkin, MD
Barbara Bradford Specter, MD
Marjorie Seltzer Stanek, MD

Woman's Medical College Class of Pennsylvania

Virginia M. Stellmacher, MD*
Jane Reynolds Thayer, MD
Jo Ann Ugenti, MD
Patricia A. Wesley, MD
Genevieve C. Winiarski, MD*
Meriel Lee Wu, MD
Mary L. Miller Yutzy, MD
Phillipa L. Zylanoff, MD

* deceased

 

 

 

Academic Awards

2021 Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies Awards

THE AMEDEO BONDI, PHD ENDOWED GRADUATE AWARD
To a PhD graduating student for excellence in research performance during the training experience
Dana Lengel, PhD ’21
Michelle Swift, PhD ’21

2021 Doctor of Medicine Awards

THE 2021 UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE AWARD
For demonstrated excellence in Public Health:
Shraddha R. Damaraju

THE DR. ELIAS ABRUTYN AWARD
For excellence in Infectious Diseases:
Troy Joseph Anlage

THE PAULA BERNOCCHI MEMORIAL AWARD
For excellence in the field of Emergency Medicine:
Allison Grace Donahue
For excellence in the field of Psychiatry:
Saranya S. Khurana

THE IAIN F.S. BLACK AWARD
For excellence in Pediatrics, presented by the Department of Pediatrics and the Medical Staff of St. Christopher's Hospital for Children:
Denysia Monique Allen

THE LUTHER W. BRADY, MD AWARD
For excellence in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Oncology:
Sravya Koduri

THE RONALD P. CAPUTO AWARD
For outstanding clinical skills and humanitarianism in the care of medical patients:
Shraddha R. Damaraju

THE ELSIE REID CARRINGTON AWARD
For a graduating senior who has demonstrated a high level of accomplishment and who has demonstrated outstanding leadership and service to the student body:
Sara Jane Settle

THE HARRIS R. CLEARFIELD AWARD
For excellence in Gastroenterology:
Lisa Chang

THE MAURICE C. CLIFFORD, MD LEADERSHIP AWARD
For a graduating senior who has excelled academically and whose accomplishments exhibit outstanding leadership, integrity, excellence and volunteer service in activities devoted to human welfare:
Shraddha R. Damaraju

THE SELMA AND OSCAR CORN, MD MEMORIAL IN ORTHOPAEDICS HU ’43 AWARD
For excellence in Orthopaedic Surgery, proven scholarship and demonstrated leadership amongst peers:
William Lawrence Justice

THE DREXEL UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AWARD
For dedication and contribution to the community and University:
Kyle Corsini Trabocco

THE DREXEL UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE SGA AWARD
For outstanding dedication and loyalty to the school and the student body:
Waneeza Mughees

THE ALAN EDELSOHN MEMORIAL PRIZE
For outstanding leadersip and service to the student body and the College of Medicine:
Christina Elizabeth Fleckenstein

THE DIANA J. EGAN AWARD
For excellence in clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology:
Leah Rachel Fendrick

THE SOCIETY FOR ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE AWARD
For excellence in Emergency Medicine:
Nigel James Bowe

THE DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY, COMMUNITY AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AWARD
For excellence in Family Medicine:
Leila Elise Hilal
For excellence in Community and Preventive Medicine:
Joel Esteban Castillo

THE EVA FERNANDEZ FOX AWARD
For the graduating senior who best demonstrates personal integrity, stability, responsibility and loyalty to the College of Medicine:
Caya Mariet McFalls

THE WILLIAM GREGG AWARD
Graduation prize for Humanitarianism in Care of Pediatric Patients:
Sara Jane Settle

THE LESTER J. GROVERMAN, MD MEMORIAL AWARD
For outstanding clinical and academic performance in Hematology and Oncology:
Patrick Thomas Campbell

THE DR. MARY ELLEN HARTMAN AWARD
For a student underrepresented in medicine who has demonstrated outstanding social consciousness and leadership with peers and the community:
William Lawrence Justice

THE BEATRICE STERLING HOLLANDER, MD, WMC '41 MEMORIAL AWARD
To the student in the graduating class who shows promise of leadership, high character, and dedication to service:
Waneeza Mughees

THE RITA G. JACOBS AWARD
For excellence and compassion in Anesthesiology and Pain Management:
Valeryia Pratasava

THE ROBERT F. JOHNSTON MEMORIAL AWARD
For excellence in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine:
Kyle Perry Santerian

THE JOSEPH A. LANGBORD MEMORIAL PRIZE
For a graduating senior who best exemplifies the qualities of humanitarianim in the practice of medicine:
Oluwakemi M. Adesina

THE WILLIAM LIKOFF, MD MEMORIAL AWARD IN CARDIOLOGY
For the graduating senior with the most promise in the field of Cardiology:
Gurmukh Singh Kainth

THE DANIEL MASON, MD HU '44 AWARD
For Cardiovascular clinical work:
Emily Suzanne Perkinson

DR. NATHALIE MAY PHYLLIS MARCIANO JR. AWARD
For outstanding leadership and service to the student body and College of Medicine:
Oluwakemi M. Adesina

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AWARD
For excellence in Renal and Electrolyte studies:
Morgane Nina Bulpin

THE DEYLAN C. MOORE AWARD
For leadership, humanism, and service to the student body and the community:
Ann Marie Carnevale

THE ALMA D. MORANI, MD WMC '31 AWARD IN GROSS ANATOMY
For excellence in Anatomy during the senior year:
Widly Coulanges
Milap Hetal Desai
Leila Elise Hilal
Olivia Elise Hilal

THE DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AWARD
For excellence in Neurology:
Carrie-Anne Barry
Lesya Alexandra Cravens

THE DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY AWARD
For overall academic excellence in the Obstetrics and Gynecology:
Saira Milind Kothari
For academic excellence in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Clerkship:
Margot Debrabandere
For leadership in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology:
Kathryn Marie Lindstrom

THE OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS AWARD
For service to the medical school and to the student body:
Denysia Monique Allen
Anthony John Iacoviello

THE AXEL K. OLSEN, MD NEUROSURGERY AWARD
For excellence in Neurosurgery:
Abhijith Reddy Bathini
Joshua Thor Morton Lucas
Alfredo Eduardo Munoz

THE ALEXANDER PEARCE, MD AWARD
For excellence in Surgery:
Abhijith Reddy Bathini

THE RONALD S. PENNOCK, MD AWARD
For excellence in Internal Medicine and Cardiology:
Caya Mariet McFalls

THE PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY OF FAMILY PHYSICIANS, PHILADELPHIA BRANCH AWARD
For performance and leadership in Family Medicine:
Olivia Elise Hilal

THE DR. LEE WINSTON SILVER AWARD
For excellence in Pediatrics:
Elizabeth Kish Walton

THE VIVEK SUBRAMANI MEMORIAL AWARD
For leadership, compassion, service and a commitment to fostering community within the College of Medicine:
Milap Hetal Desai

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE SURGERY CLERKSHIP
Abington-Jefferson Health:
Elizabeth Kish Walton
Allegheny Health Network:
Hemanth Manju Venkatesh
Crozer-Chester Medical Center:
Abhijith Reddy Bathini
Kaiser Permanente Bay Area:
Samantha Lynne Kruger
Philadelphia Area:
Benjamin Steeves Cote
Reading Hospital/Tower Health:
Aishwarya Suresh
UPMC Pinnacle:
Devin Justine Barnaby
WellSpan York Hospital:
Vincent Michael Hayes

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY AWARD
For excellence in the Surgery Pathway:
Margaret Helen O’Connor

THE CHARLES SWARTZ AWARD
For academic and clinical excellence in Medicine:
Ella Careen Ishaaya

THE DANIEL M. TABAS AWARD
For outstanding scholarly achievement by a student pursuing a career in Primary Care:
Neev Shah

THE THOMAS J. VISCHER AWARD
For clinical excellence in Medicine:
Alex Rose Berman
John Abbanob Ebeid
Meera Jain

THE ARTHUR AND BERTHA WEISMAN AWARD
For excellence in Child Psychiatry:
Emily Ann Smith

THE RANDALL WEISS AWARD
For excellence in Psychiatry:
Linda Ann Chamberlin

THE WOMAN ONE SCHOLAR AWARD
Elizabeth Elena Centurion

THE WOMEN'S HEALTH EDUCATION AWARD
In recognition of outstanding leadership and community commitment in the field of Women's Health:
Academic Achievement:
Nikita Dahake
Leadership:
Leila Elise Hilal
Community Commitment:
Charmie V. Mehta

THE WU FAMILY PRIZE
For excellence in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation:
Adrian Bright Oppong

THE DR. MARY YANKOSKY AWARD
For excellence in Endocrinology:
Jeffrey Thomas Student
For excellence in Radiologic Sciences:
Savannah Rose Gorisek

 

 

 

Faculty Awards for Distinguished Clinical Teaching

Dean's Special Awards for Excellence in Clinical Teaching

Allegheny Health Network
Andrew J. Klobuka, MD
Department of Radiology

Coatesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center
David Kaicher, MD
Department of Psychiatry

Crozer-Chester Medical Center
Ashley N. Henderson, MD, MBA
Department of Pediatrics

Friends Hospital
Pamela London, DO
Department of Psychiatry

Holy Redeemer Hospital
Lauren R. Maher, MD, FACOG
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

 
 

Kaiser Permanente - Bay Area
Jeffrey Andal, MD
Department of Medicine

Mercy Health System
Mohammad Alauddin, MRCP(UK), MD, FACP
Department of Medicine

Reading Hospital – Tower Health
Susmita Paladugu, MD
Department of Medicine

St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children
Erica Poletto, MD
Department of Radiology

St. Francis Medical Center
Adam C. Kaplan, MD, FACP
Department of Medicine

 
 

UPMC Harrisburg
Saketram Komanduri, MD
Department of Medicine

Virtua Health – Mount Holly Hospital
Michelle L. Salvatore, MD, FACOG
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

WellSpan York Hospital
Lorraine Cummings, MD
Department Obstetrics and Gynecology

Dean's Special Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching at a Family Practice Site

UPMC Harrisburg: Fisher Road Family Practice

 

 

 

Drexel University Board of Trustees

  • Alfred F. Altomari ’82
  • Chris McKendry Andrade '90
  • Michael Barry ’81
  • Jeffrey A. Beachell ’93
  • James Bean ’91
  • Sally J. Bellet, Esq.
  • Gregory S. Bentley
  • Thomas E. “Rick” Berk ’86
  • Ted Bryce ’93
  • Karen Dougherty Buchholz
  • Randall S. Burkert ’82
  • Thomas A. Caramanico
  • R. John Chapel Jr. ’67
  • Hon. Ida K. Chen
  • Kathleen P. Chimicles, ASA ’83
  • Della Clark
  • Abbie Dean ’08
  • Nicholas DeBenedictis ’68, ’69, HD ’87
  • Gerianne Tringali DiPiano
  • Domenic M. DiPiero III
  • Angela Dowd-Burton ’74, ’79
  • Thomas O. Fitzpatrick, Esq.
  • Brian R. Ford
  • Michael C. Forman
  • John A. Fry
    President
  • Kenneth Fulmer, ’92, ’00
  • Sean J. Gallagher ’93
  • David R. Geltzer ’77
  • Richard A. Greenawalt ’66
    Chairman
  • David Griffith
  • Mauricio Gutierrez
  • Richard A. Hayne
    Vice Chairman
  • Nina Henderson
    Vice Chairman
  • Richard C. Ill ’73
  • Patricia H. Imbesi ’69
  • Joseph H. Jacovini, Esq., HD ’04
  • Thomas R. Kline, Esq.
  • Corina Lam ’10
  • J. Michael Lawrie ’77
  • Raphael C. Lee, MD ’75
  • Thomas Leonard, Esq., ’68
  • Jeffrey J. Lyash ’84
  • Jerry J. Martin ’77
  • Mark McAdoo ‘87
  • Patrick S. McGonigal '86
  • Matthew S. Naylor ’12
  • Denis P. O’Brien ’87
  • Kevin J. O’Hara '83
  • Richelle P. Parham ’91
  • Charles P. Pizzi
  • Thomas M. Rampulla '94
  • Kathleen Reardon ‘96
  • Maria C. Renz ’90
  • Malik J. Rose ’96, HD '09
  • Virginia S. Rose
  • Stan Silverman ’69, ’74
    Vice Chairman
  • Joseph P. Ujobai ’84
  • Charles K. Valutas ’73
  • Michael J. Williams ’80, ’83

Emeritus Trustees

  • Paul “Mel” Baiada ’82, ‘85
  • Sylvia "Sibby" Merkel Brasler ’60
  • Robert R. Buckley ’58, HD ’12
  • John G. "Jack" Johnson Jr. ’70, ’72
  • George F. Krall Jr. ’58, HD ’14
  • James E. Marks ’47, ’49, HD ’15
  • C.R. "Chuck" Pennoni ’63, ’66, HD ’92
  • D. Howard Pierce ’71
  • John J. Roberts ’67, ’71, HD ’05
  • William T. Schleyer ’73, HD ’06
  • Stephen A. Sheller, Esq. HD ’17
  • Ray Westphal ’59, HD ’02