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Behavioral Healthcare Education Live Webinars

Behavioral Healthcare Education offers a number of webinars that are informative, convenient and can be accessed from your office or home. These courses include several important topics that are usually booked to capacity in our live training series. All BHE courses, live and online, offer continuing education credits.

2023 Webinars

February 7, 2023, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
WOL 057: Borderline Personality Disorder: Issues and Interventions

Training fee: $45
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, and Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious mental illness generally characterized by instability in affect, relationships, self-image and behavior. This course will provide a general overview of BPD including information on: DSM-IV TR criteria, etiology, suicidality and parasuicidality, therapeutic approaches and theoretical orientations. Treatment challenges are discussed; of primary importance is the need to maintain empathy and rapport.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this web-based training, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize basic diagnostic criteria for BPD, including recognizing common CODs
  • Describe the role of trauma and abuse in the development of BPD
  • Discuss the role of self-injury and suicide in BPD
  • Review basic therapeutic approaches, as well as specific theoretical orientations, notably DBT
  • Recognize the importance of counter-transference issues in treating a person with BPD

CE Credits:
APA-5; CPRP-5; LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5; NBCC-5; PA Act48-5; PCB-5; PSNA-5; IACET-.5

Register for the webinar

Red star with text that says 'NEW'February 15, 2023, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
WOL 397: Ethics and Addiction: The Impact of Stigma and Discrimination

Training fee: $27
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

The United States is in the midst of a public health crisis arising from untreated substance use disorders. A major obstacle to engaging individuals in treatment is the overwhelming stigma against those abusing substances. Stigma and discrimination stymies progress across efforts of prevention, treatment and recovery. Health care professionals often unintentionally contribute to and perpetuate stigma, many times judging and failing to adequately care for the very people they aim to help.

Alleviating stigma related to substance use disorders is challenging. However, efforts are needed to decrease the perception of blame and increase treatment engagement. In this course we will consider the ways in which morals, attitudes, and culture contribute to stigmatization and discrimination against those abusing substances. We will contemplate the language we may use to better preserve the dignity and respect of each individual. Finally, we will examine the importance of shifting public perception and practitioner attitudes away from blame and shame, and toward respect and compassion.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this web-based training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss current attitudes and perceptions toward those with substance use disorders
  • Examine how stigma and discrimination impact treatment engagement and recovery
  • Explore the ethical responsibility of practitioners to interact in a respectful and dignified manner with those abusing substances

CE Credits:
APA-3; CPRP-3; LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3; NBCC-3; PA Act48-3; PCB-3; PSNA-3; IACET-.3

Register for the webinar

Red star with text that says 'NEW'February 15, 2023, 1 – 4 p.m.
WOL 252: : Ethics, Suicide & Coercive Practices: Are We Doing More Harm Than Good?

Training fee: $27
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Working with clients experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviors is one of the greatest challenges faced by behavioral health practitioners. Increasing suicide rates, misguided prevention efforts and the lack of accessible assessment tools and treatments creates a sense of turmoil among many helpers. We are charged with balancing the desire to support those suffering with incredible psychic pain while navigating the expectations and constraints of the law and professional ethics.

In this course, we will consider the concept of suicidality in the context of its historical origins and evolution through modern times in terms of cultural and societal values, morals, ethics, law and approaches to suicide intervention by behavioral health professionals. We will examine whether death by suicide and physician assisted suicide is a human right among those with and those without mental illness. Finally, we will contemplate the use of involuntary and coercive practices to determine their utility in managing those experiencing suicidal thoughts and the desire to end their lives within the bounds of legal and ethical obligations.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this web-based training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance and impact of personal ethical, moral and value beliefs regarding suicide in clinical practice
  • Analyze the risks and benefits associated with coercive practices in the management of clients presenting with suicidal thoughts and behaviors
  • Identify the practitioner’s legal and ethical responsibilities when working with those at risk for suicide

CE Credits:
APA-3; CPRP-3; LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3; NBCC-3; PA Act48-3; PCB-3; PSNA-3; IACET-.3

Register for the webinar

February 28, 2023, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
WOL 426: Marijuana: The Past, Present and Future

Training fee: $45
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

Marijuana has an extensive (and often controversial) history in the United States, and worldviews concerning its’ use have been dramatically shifting in recent years. Even with evolving societal attitudes and changing governmental legislation, marijuana use can still present clinical issues for some users. This training will address DSM-5 diagnostic presentations as well as the impact of marijuana on the brain. Issues surrounding medicalization in Pennsylvania will also be explored. Lastly, general approaches to treatment will be discussed.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this web-based training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the history and background of marijuana and its use in the United States.
  • Examine DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for marijuana intoxication, withdrawal, and use disorder.
  • Summarize the effects of marijuana on the brain.
  • Describe issues relating to the medicalization of marijuana in Pennsylvania.
  • Explore general treatment strategies for helping people struggling with marijuana use.

CE Credits:
APA-5; CPRP-5; LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5; NBCC-5; PA Act48-5; PCB-5; PSNA-5; IACET-.5

Register for the webinar

Red star with text that says 'NEW'March 2, 2023, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
WOL 564: Engagement: The Biggest Predictor of Success

Training fee: $27
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

Research clearly demonstrates that the single biggest predictor of therapeutic success is the strength of the clinical relationship. The helper’s ongoing focus on engagement is central to this alliance. Awareness of the importance of engagement, however, does not mitigate the myriad obstacles that interfere with developing and maintaining rapport. This course will define the concept of engagement and highlight its significance in clinical settings. Additionally, barriers will be discussed from the practitioner’s perspective. Strategies will also be provided to assist helpers in improving engagement with those they serve.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this web-based training, participants will be able to:

  • Describe engagement as a primary factor of importance in clinical outcomes
  • Identify at least three barriers to engagement
  • List several strategies to enhance engagement

CE Credits:
APA-3; CPRP-3; LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3; NBCC-3; PA Act48-3; PCB-3; PSNA-3; IACET-.3

Register for the webinar

March 7, 2023, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
WOL 167: An Introduction to DBT

Training fee: $45
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP, and Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Working effectively with people who are diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) presents serious challenges for behavioral health practitioners. Marsha Linehan has developed a research-based treatment approach called dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) which has been used in a variety of settings in working with people who have serious impulse control and emotional dysregulation disorders such as BPD. This course introduces participants to this model and identifies core skills applicable in practice settings.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this web-based training, participants will be able to:

  • Cite DSM-5 criteria for BPD
  • Present an overview of the DBT treatment model
  • Identify stages of recovery in the DBT model to use in individual treatment planning
  • Distinguish those DBT skills that are effective in dealing with emotional dysregulation
  • Describe how to apply DBT psychosocial skills training in a group program designed for teaching symptom management

CE Credits:
APA-5; CPRP-5; LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5; NBCC-5; PA Act48-5; PCB-5; PSNA-5; IACET-.5

Register for the webinar

*These courses are part of the ten-course Trauma Series

If you cannot attend a webinar, we offer a number of other on-demand trainings. Learn more.

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