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Behavioral Healthcare Education In-Person Courses

COVID-19 Precautions

Only vaccinated participants are invited to attend in-person classroom sessions. We will observe safety precautions including masks, sanitizer and social distancing.

 
In-person Regional and Reserve Courses are offered to behavioral health practitioners. Regional courses offer priority enrollment for those who are employed by programs receiving funding from the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services. Reserve courses have an open enrollment with no registration limits. Continuing education credits are available.

Cancellations and Refunds

For possible weather cancellations, please call toll free 877.243.3033 after 6:30 a.m. the day of the training to confirm either cancellation or presentation of the course. If you must cancel your attendance, please call. Keep in mind that attendance will be electronically tracked and if you register for a course that you do not attend and do not cancel prior to the offering, your future registration may be blocked.

If you need to cancel your attendance at a course, please notify us within 24 hours of the training by calling 877.243.3033 or emailing bheweb@drexel.edu. We will credit your account for a future trainings. Refunds will not be made for any trainings (virtual or in person). Accounts will be credited for future training interests.

Same-Day Registration

We will no longer allow walk-in/onsite registration.

Red star with text that says 'NEW'February 16, 2023, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR 701: Meeting at the Middle: Bridging, Brokering, Becoming Adult — A Targeted Case Management Service Guide

Training fee: $45
Location: Courtyard Philadelphia City Avenue
Instructor: Brenda J. Weaver, MA, CPRP

Transitional aged youth (TAY), a demographic spanning ages 15–25, are experiencing a human developmental stage that encompasses the time between being a child and becoming an adult. It involves a formative transition characterized by changes, risk-taking and a heightened vulnerability for mental illness and other health conditions. This unique group of individuals who, according to a national youth mental health survey, “lack developmentally appropriate connections and experience limited to no meaningful preparation or guidance for adulthood” (WHO, 2020), are least likely to seek or acknowledge a need for help and more likely than any other age group to experience isolation, barriers to access and service gaps.

Current research highlights the dire need for relational capacity and a sneakers-on-the-ground approach to making case management a pivotal resource to effectively meet and greet transitional aged youth. This population requires services designed specifically to help navigate gaps, broker across systems and form successful alliances. Practitioners must engage in activities that identify needs and develop allies to support therapeutic efforts, providing incentives and being guideposts to growth along the way. This web-based training integrates case management technology with current youth-centered perspectives and evidenced practices into tips and tools that help practitioners and youth survive and thrive, leaving them able to plan, navigate and access meaningful transition-to-adult-life sensibilities, skills, services and supports.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the need for a youth-centered approach to case management service delivery
  • Describe principles, life contexts and the intersections of systems and services
  • Discuss evidenced youth-specific practices and key developmental skills to manage changes, develop understanding of adult methods and make meaningful choices
  • Review applicable state regulations and processes for determining necessity, expectations and role functions within youth life contexts and environments
  • Practice crafting an integrated healthy adult transition service

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

Red star with text that says 'NEW'February 17, 2023, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR 256: Therapeutic Dynamics: What Makes for an Effective Helper?

Training fee: $45
Location: Courtyard Philadelphia City Avenue
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

Research in our field is constantly evolving (and often contradictory) in terms of what practices are most effective. However, there are a variety of factors that have been consistently shown to contribute to positive clinical outcomes. This course will address the ingredients of interpersonal dynamics, indispensable attitudes and related skills that contribute to a recipe for successful helping relationships. In particular, this interactive training will delve into several essential therapeutic variables, including empathy, acceptance, hope, focus and evocation. Additionally, attendees will be encouraged to examine specific ways to improve their ability to be a difference-maker as a helper.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss at least five challenges of the therapeutic process, from both the client and helper perspective
  • Examine essential attitudes involved in developing healing alliances
  • Identify several useful skills that can enhance therapeutic outcomes
  • Explain various methods of improving one’s expertise as a behavioral healthcare provider

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

Red star with text that says 'NEW'February 22, 2023, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR 404: Advances In Understanding and Treating Addiction: Where We Are and Where We’re Going

Training fee: $45
Location: Holiday Inn, Grantville, PA
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Addictive disorders are some of the most prevalent and stigmatized illnesses in our society. With a long history of moralized beliefs and attitudes towards those displaying addictive behaviors, many view addiction as a lack of willpower or weakness of character. Yet a significant body of research and recent neuroscientific advancements in the field assert addiction is a brain disease. Conversely, a body of scholars disagree with the disease model of addiction and propose addictive behavior is better described as a non-pathological mechanism of choice and motivation. Continued lack of agreement on the fundamental aspects of the phenomenon may explain limited treatment outcomes and inadequate recovery rates.

In this course, we will discuss the many concerns and frustrations related to working with addictive disorders. We will consider various explanations for the disorder and reflect on cultural and social determinants and their impact on the prevalence and proliferation of addiction in our society. We will review current treatment approaches including efforts to improve current practices, such as advances in biomarkers and brain research. Finally, we will examine the role of the practitioner and how we can best provide competent treatment while bringing awareness to the underlying stigmas present in helping relationships.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the disease model of addiction and how it impacts our understanding of the disorder
  • Discuss the choice model of addiction that removes pathology and replaces it with autonomy
  • Describe how social determinants, including racial and ethnic disparities, play a significant role in the risk for addiction
  • Examine the various domains implicated in the etiology of addictive disorders
  • Identify current approaches to the treatment of addictive disorders and how current advances may shape treatment in the future

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

February 23, 2023, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR 546: The Dark Triad: Narcissistic, Antisocial, and Psychopathic Personality Structures

Training fee: $45
Location: Holiday Inn, Grantville, PA
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

The dark triad of personality is a constellation of three socially aversive personality traits: narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism. These personality patterns share commonalities, including grandiosity, self-promotion, entitlement, impulsivity, emotional coldness, and aggression. However, there are vast differences in the etiology, manifestation, and adaptivity of individuals with clinical and sub-clinical presentations. This course explores the malevolent side of human nature and provides strategies to improve assessment, treatment, and work more effectively with those presenting these personality structures.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Define the clinical and sub-clinical personality structures associated with the dark triad.
  • Describe the etiology of narcissistic, psychopathic, and antisocial personalities.
  • Identify tools used to assess narcissism, antisocial, and psychopathic personalities.
  • Evaluate treatment approaches for narcissistic and antisocial personality disorders.
  • Discuss challenges and best practices in working with clients with dark personality structures.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

Red star with text that says 'NEW'March 15-16, 2023, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
TR 612: Psychiatric Rehabilitation TIPS [Tools to Improve Practices]

Training fee: $108
Location: Courtyard Philadelphia City Avenue
Instructor: Brenda Weaver, MA, CPRP

*Trainees must attend both days to receive credits.*

Psychiatric rehabilitation (PsyR) recovery-oriented work intends to effect change in a person's self-mastery and functional abilities within the roles and environments of their choice. The services combine learning and developmental strategies to abate symptom interferences and personal distress; skills training and supportive services to improve housing, education, work and employment, and social life role and goal successes; and satisfying natural support networks.

This 12-hour training articulates the PsyR essentials to facilitate recovery work: skilled practitioners, education and skills development. The course translates strength-based efforts and person-centered thinking into motivational strategies and evidenced educational and skill building methodologies.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Recall the philosophies, personal characteristics and professional expectations for psychiatric rehabilitation practitioner thinking and behaviors
  • Summarize the role, relationships, fundamental skills and capabilities of a psych rehab practitioner
  • Describe ways and means to connect and collaborate with diverse recovering individuals
  • Apply concepts and practice through reflections, illustrations and scenarios (relational, motivational, educational, cognitive healing and behavioral approaches

CE Credits:
APA-12, CPRP-12, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-12, NBCC-12, PA Act48-12, PCB-12, PSNA-12, IACET-1.2

Register for the course
 

Red star with text that says 'NEW'March 29, 2023, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR 404: Advances in Understanding and Treating Addiction: Where We Are and Where We’re Going

Training fee: $45
Location: Sure Stay Plus Hotel Best Western, Bethlehem
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Addiction was identified as a disease in the early 19th century, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the United States alone, there are more than 50 million illicit drug users, 27 million daily smokers, and 16 million heavy alcohol drinkers. Yet, there is still no consensus about the conceptualization of addictive disorders in terms of the etiology, course of the illness or how to best treat them. Addictive disorders are some of the most prevalent and stigmatized illnesses in our society. With a long history of moralized beliefs and attitudes towards those displaying addictive behaviors, many view addiction as a lack of willpower or weakness of character. These views, compounded by the destructive behavioral manifestations of addiction, financial burden, and chronic and relapsing nature of the disease, lead to a society with little patience and empathy.

A significant body of research and recent neuroscientific advancements in the field assert addiction is a brain disease. Conversely, a body of scholars disagree with the disease model of addiction and propose addictive behavior is better described as a non-pathological mechanism of choice and motivation. Continued lack of agreement on the fundamental aspects of the phenomenon may explain limited treatment outcomes and inadequate recovery rates; 60% of those receiving addiction treatment in the United States will relapse within one year.

In this course, we will discuss the many concerns and frustrations related to working with addictive disorders without a reliable historical or science-based conceptualization. We will consider various explanations for the disorder and reflect on cultural and social determinants, and their impact on the prevalence and proliferation of addiction in our society. We will review current treatment approaches, including efforts to improve current practices, such as advances in biomarkers and brain research. Finally, we will examine the role of the practitioner and how we can best provide competent treatment while bringing awareness to the underlying stigmas present in helping relationships.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the disease model of addiction and how it impacts our understanding of the disorder
  • Discuss the choice model of addiction that removes pathology and replaces it with autonomy
  • Describe how social determinants, including racial and ethnic disparities, play a significant role in the risk for addiction
  • Examine the various domains implicated in the etiology of addictive disorders
  • Identify current approaches to the treatment of addictive disorders and how current advances may shape treatment in the future

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

March 30, 2023, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR 560: Teens and Trauma: Navigating Challenges*

Training fee: $45
Location: Sure Stay Plus Hotel Best Western, Bethlehem
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Being a teenager is challenging enough, but what happens when trauma enters the picture?  Rapid developmental changes combined with trauma-related psychological and behavioral issues become an added difficulty for adolescents and their support networks. The struggle to make sense of it all may trigger substance use, self-injury, and sensation-seeking behaviors as efforts to cope. These factors also strain relationships, lead to inaccurate diagnoses and misguide interventions.

This training will discuss trauma related symptoms and developmental influences, as well as current evidence-based approaches to treatment and strategies for partnering with caregivers. The power of resiliency and hope are highlighted as practical reminders that growth and change is always possible!

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Identify trauma-related symptoms and behaviors in adolescent youth
  • Explain cultural and individual variables that affect adolescents who have experienced trauma 
  • Discuss core issues related to developmental trauma disorder, including the impact on intrapersonal, interpersonal, regulatory and neurocognitive competencies 
  • Describe appropriate, evidence-based interventions for this population 
  • Examine ways to partner with caregivers to assist in better managing trauma-induced symptoms

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

March 31, 2023, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
TR 286: Trauma and Children*

Training fee: $45
Location: Courtyard Philadelphia City Avenue
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

Children often present complex arrays of symptoms and behaviors that are challenging both for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment. This course examines the potential biopsychosocial impact of trauma on children, including attachment disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It also examines empirically supported treatments and interventions designed to address the impact of abuse and trauma at different developmental stages within childhood.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the effects of family, age, gender and sociocultural factors on the traumatic experience
  • Review symptoms and assessment criteria for disorders related to childhood trauma, including the DSM-5 developmental subtype of PTSD called “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder for Children 6 Years and Younger”
  • Describe alternate ways of viewing and labeling “difficult” behaviors, using the domains of attachment, emotional dysregulation and sense of self
  • Discuss empirically supported treatment options currently considered to be most effective

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

*These courses are part of the 10-course Trauma Series.

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