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Behavioral Healthcare Education In-Person Courses

COVID-19 Precautions

Only vaccinated participants are invited to attend in-person classroom sessions. We will observe safety precautions including masks, sanitizer and social distancing.

 
In-person Regional and Reserve Courses are offered to behavioral health practitioners. Regional courses offer priority enrollment for those who are employed by programs receiving funding from the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services. Reserve courses have an open enrollment with no registration limits. Continuing education credits are available.

Cancellations and Refunds

For possible weather cancellations, please call toll free 877.243.3033 after 6:30 a.m. the day of the training to confirm either cancellation or presentation of the course. If you must cancel your attendance, please call. Keep in mind that attendance will be electronically tracked and if you register for a course that you do not attend and do not cancel prior to the offering, your future registration may be blocked.

If you need to cancel your attendance at a course, please notify us within 24 hours of the training by calling 877.243.3033 or emailing bheweb@drexel.edu. We will credit your account for a future trainings. Refunds will not be made for any trainings (virtual or in person). Accounts will be credited for future training interests.

Same-Day Registration

We will no longer allow walk-in/onsite registration.

Red star with text that says 'NEW'October 25, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 444: Psychiatric Rehabilitation Ethics: Principles, Issues and Making Decisions

Training fee: $45
Location: Friends Hospital, Scattergood Building
Instructor: Brenda J. Weaver, MA, CPRP

In accordance with the mission the psychiatric rehabilitation association and the principles of psychiatric recovery, this training fosters the growth of a competent and ethical psychiatric rehabilitation workforce and offers a guide for the everyday conduct of practitioners.

The principles of psychiatric rehabilitation form the framework in which to address situations that challenge thinking and impact perceptions of “what is right and just.” In this course, composite situations with ethical implications are used to stimulate discussions and engage in a decision-making process, including identifying all the principles within the PRA Code that have a bearing on the situation and applicable professional interventions and ethical judgments involved.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Review the rehabilitation ethical principles, the code and its spirit
  • Discuss the rehabilitation process, in what situations might the code of ethics be applicable and how to apply it
  • Identify and resolve practical dilemmas at the intersections of personal preferences and professional obligations
  • Formulate and describe ethical applications to share power in ways that support the relationship and facilitate recovery/rehabilitation efforts
  • Discuss the resolution process of violations, grievances and appeals

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

October 26, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 176: “It’s Just Weed!” Adolescents and Cannabis Use

Training fee: $45
Location: Sure Stay Plus Hotel by Best Western
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Cannabis use continues to increase in the United States as cannabis potency rises to levels never seen before. With the introduction of medical and recreational policies in states throughout the country, the perception that cannabis use is problematic is dropping to all-time lows. While there are possible medical benefits for the use of cannabis, there are also concerns and consequences related to its use, specifically among adolescents. This course will examine the reversal of stigmas once related to cannabis use and how those changes may be detrimental to our adolescents. We will review the extreme changes in cannabis potency, modern methods of consumption including the use of cannabis concentrates, and the related consequences, including cannabis hyperemesis syndrome, “greening out,” and associations with psychosis and other psychiatric disorders. We will also outline screening and assessment measures, diagnosis of cannabis-related disorders, and empirically supported treatments and prevention opportunities for adolescent cannabis use.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Describe cannabis prevalence rates and factors contributing to increasing rates of use among adolescents
  • List three main classes of cannabinoids and their effects on the mind and body
  • Differentiate varieties of cannabis concentrates and how rising potency contributes to negative outcomes
  • Summarize risk factors for adolescent cannabis use and consequences of use, including associations with accidents, acute medical issues, increased prevalence of psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders and negative psychosocial outcomes
  • Outline DSM-5 criteria for cannabis related disorders, identify screening and assessment tools, and describe empirically supported treatment and prevention strategies for adolescent cannabis use

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

October 27, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 445: Helping Skills: The Art of Psychiatric Rehabilitation

Training fee: $45
Location: Friends Hospital, Scattergood Building
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

This course helps practitioners to transition from simply identifying skills to practicing and promoting skills with recovering persons that support their ability to assume and maintain valued roles in their personal communities. The seminar helps practitioners create a framework for evaluating and promoting skills that can be most supportive in this endeavor. It incorporates experiential practice, evaluation of more and less useful communication techniques, and ways to individualize thinking to support the differing needs of persons using psychiatric rehabilitation services.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Examine ways to think about skills development in support of community roles
  • Identify effective and ineffective practitioner behaviors re: skill development
  • Discuss a means of collaborating with recovering persons to develop specific skill sets that promote enhanced role performance
  • Incorporate these ideas and techniques into one’s psychiatric rehabilitation program

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

October 27, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 598: Vicarious Trauma: When Helping Hurts*

Training fee: $45
Location: Sure Stay Plus Hotel by Best Western
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Working with trauma survivors can be challenging for behavioral healthcare practitioners. Difficult countertransference reactions, symptoms of burnout, compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma are specific occupational hazards. Vicarious trauma can be particularly deleterious, as it may result in pervasive and permanent transformations in the helper’s belief system, relationships and worldview. Learning to protect ourselves from this cost of caring decreases the risks to self, clients and loved ones.

In this course, we introduce tools to proactively identify, prevent and address the symptoms of vicarious trauma.  We enhance our knowledge by understanding our vulnerability, identifying risk and protective factors, and increasing our awareness of signs and symptoms. We learn to enhance our well-being through self-care practices, action planning, and taking steps toward personal transformation. To meet the long-term challenges associated with our work, concepts like vicarious resilience and vicarious post-traumatic growth will be introduced.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Identify factors contributing to distress among practitioners providing trauma-informed care
  • Explain common causes of vicarious trauma among those who work with survivors of trauma
  • Analyze risk and protective factors related to vicarious trauma
  • Discuss the importance of developing a vicarious action plan for trauma practitioners
  • Define approaches that empower and promote the well-being of those working with trauma survivors

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

Red star with text that says 'NEW'November 9, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 537: Stigma and Mental Illness: Uncovering an Identity Spoiler

Training fee: $45
Location: Friends Hospital, Scattergood Building
Instructor: Brenda J. Weaver, MA, CPRP

Recovery is a complex process of adjusting personal attitudes, shifting beliefs in self, and restoring or developing a positive and meaningful identity apart from one’s condition. People living with mental illnesses identify stigma as a major factor that impacts self-esteem, self-efficacy and sense of meaning. This loss of ego, confidence and self-control derived from stigma leads to a sense of “spoiled identity” (Goffman, 1963) and impedes seeking and participating in timely managements. According to the American Psychiatric Association, despite the active anti-stigma campaigns for mental illness, it is still rampant today. This training examines the impact of stigma on self-concept, social relationships, community involvement and recovery processes for psychiatric health and well-being of individuals with mental illness.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Examine the prevalence and power of stigma among individuals living with serious mental illnesses
  • Discuss how stigma develops, is internalized and sustained, and interacts with other psychological and behavioral processes
  • Explain how the cycle of shame, stigma and discrimination impedes timely help-seeking, beliefs, access and engagement in treatments and supports
  • Identify interventions/practices evidenced to reduce internalized stigma, address other indices of psychosocial functioning and improve personal, service and social outcomes
  • Design an empowering “righteous indignation” approach to address injustices and break the bonds of stigma

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

November 10, 2022, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
TR 397: Ethics and Addiction: The Impact of Stigma and Discrimination

Training fee: $27
Location: Friends Hospital, Scattergood Building
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

The United States is in the midst of a public health crisis arising from untreated substance use disorders. A major obstacle to engaging individuals in treatment is the overwhelming stigma against those abusing substances. Stigma and discrimination stymie progress across efforts of prevention, treatment and recovery. Health care professionals often unintentionally contribute to and perpetuate stigma, many times judging and failing to adequately care for the very people they aim to help.

The elusive etiology of addiction and poor treatment outcomes continue to frustrate and confuse practitioners. The lack of effective treatments leaves many helpers discouraged and cynical about the potential for recovery. Some argue that addiction is a medical disorder characterized by profound alterations in brain circuitry due to repeated substance exposure. Others contend addiction is better conceptualized as resulting from moral, psychological, sociological, or in-born circumstances. Most recently, some assert addiction is a disorder of choice. Attitudes toward those with substance use issues often correspond to the etiological beliefs a person holds about addiction itself, which parallels the level of stigma and discrimination present.

Alleviating stigma related to substance use disorders is challenging. However, efforts are needed to decrease the perception of blame and increase treatment engagement. In this course we will consider the ways in which morals, attitudes and culture contribute to stigmatization and discrimination against those abusing substances. We will contemplate the language we may use to better preserve the dignity and respect of each individual. Finally, we will examine the importance of shifting public perception and practitioner attitudes away from blame and shame, and toward respect and compassion.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss current attitudes and perceptions toward those with substance use disorders
  • Examine how stigma and discrimination impact treatment engagement and recovery
  • Explore the ethical responsibility of practitioners to interact with those abusing substances in a respectful and dignified manner

CE Credits:
APA-3, CPRP-3, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3, NBCC-3, PA Act48-3, PCB-3, PSNA-3, IACET-.3

Register for the course
 

November 10, 2022, 1 – 4 p.m.
TR 252: Ethics, Suicide & Coercive Practices: Are We Doing More Harm Than Good?

Training fee: $27
Location: Friends Hospital, Scattergood Building
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

Working with clients experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviors is one of the greatest challenges faced by behavioral health practitioners. Increasing suicide rates, misguided prevention efforts and the lack of accessible assessment tools and treatments creates a sense of turmoil among many helpers. We are charged with balancing the desire to support those suffering with incredible psychic pain while navigating the expectations and constraints of the law and professional ethics.

The legal and ethical duty to protect individuals at risk for suicide often leads to overestimation of risk due to fears related to loss of life, liability and malpractice claims. The competing expectations of protecting a person’s civil liberties while also following federal and state statutes and adhering to professional ethics often result in the use of coercive and involuntary practices. Many argue that the duty to protect life overrides the obligation to honor an individual’s Constitutional rights. Others believe suicidality and the desire to die is an indication of mental illness and question an individual’s capacity to make informed decisions about their life and death.

In this course, we will consider the concept of suicidality in the context of its historical origins and evolution through modern times in terms of cultural and societal values, morals, ethics, laws and approaches to suicide intervention by behavioral health professionals. We will examine whether death by suicide and physician-assisted suicide is a human right among those with and those without mental illness. Finally, we will contemplate the use of involuntary and coercive practices to determine their utility in managing those experiencing suicidal thoughts and the desire to end their lives within the bounds of legal and ethical obligations.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance and impact of personal ethical, moral and value beliefs regarding suicide in clinical practice
  • Analyze the risks and benefits associated with coercive practices in the management of clients presenting with suicidal thoughts and behaviors
  • Identify the practitioner’s legal and ethical responsibilities when working with those at risk for suicide

CE Credits:
APA-3, CPRP-3, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-3, NBCC-3, PA Act48-3, PCB-3, PSNA-3, IACET-.3

Register for the course
 

November 16, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 176: “It’s Just Weed!” Adolescents and Cannabis Use

Training fee: $45
Location: Radisson Lackawanna Station, Scranton, PA
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

Cannabis use continues to increase in the United States as cannabis potency rises to levels never seen before. With the introduction of medical and recreational policies in states throughout the country, the perception that cannabis use is problematic is dropping to all-time lows. While there are possible medical benefits for the use of cannabis, there are also concerns and consequences related to its use, specifically among adolescents. This course will examine the reversal of stigmas once related to cannabis use and how those changes may be detrimental to our adolescents. We will review the extreme changes in cannabis potency, modern methods of consumption including the use of cannabis concentrates, and the related consequences, including cannabis hyperemesis syndrome, “greening out,” and associations with psychosis and other psychiatric disorders. We will also outline screening and assessment measures, diagnosis of cannabis-related disorders, and empirically supported treatments and prevention opportunities for adolescent cannabis use.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Describe cannabis prevalence rates and factors contributing to increasing rates of use among adolescents
  • List three main classes of cannabinoids and their effects on the mind and body
  • Differentiate varieties of cannabis concentrates and how rising potency contributes to negative outcomes
  • Summarize risk factors for adolescent cannabis use and consequences of use, including associations with accidents, acute medical issues, increased prevalence of psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders and negative psychosocial outcomes
  • Outline DSM-5 criteria for cannabis related disorders, identify screening and assessment tools, and describe empirically supported treatment and prevention strategies for adolescent cannabis use

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

November 17, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 057: Borderline Personality Disorder – Issues and Intervention*

Training fee: $45
Location: Radisson Lackawanna Station, Scranton, PA
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious mental illness generally characterized by instability in affect, relationships, self-image and behavior. This course will provide a general overview of BPD including information on: DSM-5 criteria, etiology, suicidality and para-suicidality, therapeutic approaches and theoretical orientations. Treatment challenges are discussed; of primary importance is the need to maintain empathy and rapport.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize basic diagnostic criteria for BPD, including recognizing common CODs
  • Describe the role of trauma and abuse in the development of BPD
  • Discuss the role of self-injury and suicide in BPD
  • Review basic therapeutic approaches, as well as specific theoretical orientations, notably DBT
  • Recognize the importance of counter-transference issues in treating a person with BPD

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

December 8, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 590: What’s Up: Engaging Transitional Aged Youth

Training fee: $45
Location: Friends Hospital, Scattergood Building
Instructor: Brenda J. Weaver, MA, CPRP

Engagement involves an organized method of services, supports and activities that are welcoming; facilitate connections between programs, services and supports; and build relationships between staff and youth, family and other informal and formal key players.

This training focuses on engagement of TAY as a critical first step in providing services and supports that facilitate a young person’s competencies toward achieving greater self-sufficiency, confidence and growth.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss factors across relevant domains that facilitate greater self-sufficiency on the road to adulthood
  • Identify methods for relationship-development and youth-centered planning that focus on young people’s futures
  • Examine characteristics of services and supports that are accessible, coordinated, appealing, non-stigmatizing and developmentally appropriate
  • Review methods to ensure a safety net of support that involves a young person’s parents, family members, and other informal and formal key players.

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

Red star with text that says 'NEW'December 14, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 256: BHE Therapeutic Dynamics: Becoming a More Effective Helper

Training fee: $45
Location: Holiday Inn, Grantville, PA
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

Research in our field is constantly evolving (and often contradictory) in terms of what practices are most effective. However, there are a variety of factors that have been consistently shown to contribute to positive clinical outcomes. This course will address the ingredients of interpersonal dynamics, indispensable attitudes and related skills that contribute to a recipe for successful helping relationships. In particular, this interactive training will delve into several essential therapeutic variables, including empathy, acceptance, hope, focus and evocation. Additionally, attendees will be encouraged to examine specific ways to improve their ability to be a difference-maker as a helper.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss at least five challenges of the therapeutic process, from both the client and helper perspective
  • Examine essential attitudes involved in developing healing alliances
  • Identify several useful skills that can enhance therapeutic outcomes
  • Explain various methods of improving one’s expertise as a behavioral healthcare provider

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

December 15, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 567: BHE Toolkit 3: Specific Practices for the Art of Helping People with Histories of Trauma*

Training fee: $45
Location: Holiday Inn, Grantville, PA
Instructor: Christopher M. Owens, MA, LPC, CCTP

This course focuses on specific interventions of use to the professional helper when providing therapeutic services in behavioral healthcare. The aim of this workshop is to add to the helper’s “bag of tricks” or “toolkit” pertaining to assisting people with histories of trauma. Participants engage in didactic and experiential learning related to several specific interventions geared towards managing and moving beyond trauma. Participants also dialogue in small groups to share creative and effective interventions they have used in their various practice settings.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the general purposes of interventions
  • Discuss having a sound rationale for using various techniques
  • Describe the benefits associated with each strategy
  • Outline the drawbacks and barriers to using selected interventions
  • Implement each intervention as relevant to one’s own professional practice

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

December 21, 2022, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
TR 546: The Dark Triad: An Overview of Sub-Clinical Narcissistic, Antisocial & Psychopathic Personality Structures

Training fee: $45
Location: Friends Hospital, Scattergood Building
Instructor: Lindsay Martin, PhD, LPC, NCC

The dark triad of personality is a constellation of three socially aversive personality traits: narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism. These personality patterns share commonalities, including grandiosity, self-promotion, entitlement, impulsivity, emotional coldness, and aggression. However, there are vast differences in the etiology, manifestation and adaptivity of individuals with clinical and sub-clinical presentations. This course explores the malevolent side of human nature and provides strategies to improve assessment and treatment, and work more effectively with those presenting these personality structures.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Define the clinical and sub-clinical personality structures associated with the dark triad
  • Describe the etiology of narcissistic, psychopathic, and antisocial personalities
  • Identify tools used to assess narcissism, antisocial, and psychopathic personalities
  • Evaluate treatment approaches for narcissistic and antisocial personality disorders
  • Discuss challenges and best practices in working with clients with dark personality structures

CE Credits:
APA-5, CPRP-5, LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT-5, NBCC-5, PA Act48-5, PCB-5, PSNA-5, IACET-.5

Register for the course
 

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