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Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy Graduate Students

1st Year

  • Kendra Case
  • Christina Curran-Alfaro
  • Adam Hall
  • Arron Hall
  • Andrew Lockhart
  • Joya Maser
  • Jenna McGrath
  • Brody Carpenter
  • Amber Hilbish
  • Abby Keith
  • Pryscilla Santos Acevedo
  • Mariah Wulf

2nd Year

  • Joseph Arena
  • Marissa Cusimano
  • Ashraful Islam
  • Ashley Opalka
  • Jennifer Pastorino
  • Shayna Singh
  • Xiaohaun Sun
  • Jeremy Weinbeger
  • Jason Wickman
  • Emily Zihal

3rd Year

  • Katie Bryant
  • Shrobona Guha
  • Taylor McCorkle
  • Breanne Pirino
  • Jonathan Richards
  • Candace Rizzi-Wise
  • Kyle Samson
  • Meredith Singer (Molecular Medicine program)
  • Trevor Smith
  • Nicholas Stachowski
  • John Walker
  • Sam Wechsler

4th Year

  • Sadie Bennison
  • Andrey Borisyuk
  • Phillip Clark
  • Nancy Mack
  • Dillon Malloy
  • Micaela O'Reilly
  • Shasha Yang

5th Year

  • Jadwiga Bilchak
  • Sara Blazejewski
  • Genevieve Curtis
  • Jaclyn DeFinis
  • Silvia Fernandes
  • Dana Lengel
  • Philip Yates

6th Year

  • Pamela Alonso
  • Emily Black
  • Hemalatha Muralidharan
  • Ankita Patil
  • Margo Randelman
  • Cameron Trueblood

Student Profiles

Ilse Pamela Alonso, MS

Ilse Pamela Alonso

PhD Student, España Lab
ipa23@drexel.edu

Education:
Pamela graduated with a bachelor’s degree in pharmaceutical science from La Salle University in Mexico City. In 2014, she completed her master’s degree in neuroscience from Universidad Austral de Chile in Valdivia, Chile. She entered Drexel University graduate program in fall 2015 and joined the laboratory of Dr. Rodrigo España to pursue a PhD in neuroscience.

Research:
Cocaine use disorder followed by abstinence engenders sleep disruptions that contribute to the progressive incubation of cocaine craving across the abstinence period. Pamela's project examines whether restoring sleep during abstinence prevents incubation of cocaine craving by modulating dopamine terminal function in the nucleus accumbens.

Joseph Arena, MS

Joseph Arena: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

MD/PhD Student, Detloff Lab
jma368@drexel.edu

Education:
Joseph graduated from Stony Brook University with a bachelor of science degree double majoring in psychology and biology with a specialization in neuroscience. He then received a master of science degree through the Drexel Pathway to Medical School post-baccalaureate program. After cementing his interest in research during his first year at Drexel University College of Medicine, he transferred from the MD program into the combined MD/PhD dual degree program.

Research:
Joseph is working in the lab of Dr. Megan Detloff. It is well established that inflammation and an increased immune response correlates with central pain development after a spinal cord injury. However, there is still much to be learned about the underlying neuroimmune mechanisms leading to central pain. Joseph's current research within the Detloff Lab involves studying the role of regulatory T-Cells in immune cell suppression within the context of spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain development.

Research interests:
Neurotrauma, neuroimmunology, spinal cord injury, adaptive immunity.

Jadwiga Bilchak, BS

Jani Bilchak, BS

PhD student, Cote Lab
jnb94@drexel.edu

Education:
Jadwiga earned her bachelor’s degree in neuroscience from King’s College London, where she investigated the firing properties of human immortalized stem cells used for stroke therapy. After graduating with first class honours in July 2016, she entered the Drexel University graduate program and joined the lab of Dr. Marie-Pascale Côté. 

Research:
Jadwiga’s research focuses on the effects of restoring chloride homeostasis on locomotor recovery and spastic symptoms after spinal cord injury (SCI). After SCI, there is a decrease in expression and function of KCC2, a critical regulator of chloride homeostasis in the central nervous system. By pharmacologically enhancing KCC2, Jadwiga’s project aims to improve locomotor function and attenuate spastic symptoms via a restoration of endogenous inhibition.

Research interests:
Spinal cord injury, motoneurons, chloride homeostasis, exercise-based rehabilitation.

Emily Black, BS

Emily Black, BS

PhD student, España Lab
emb395@drexel.edu

Education:
Emily holds a BS in Neuroscience and a BA in music. She is a second-year student on the PhD track and a member of Dr. España's lab.

Research:
Using techniques such as freely moving fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, laser capture micro-dissection, and microdialysis, Emily's research examines the neurobiology underlying susceptibility and resilience to stress in a post-traumatic stress disorder rat model, with a specific focus on hypocretin and dopamine within the mesolimbic circuitry.

Sara Blazejewski, BS

Sara Blazejewski, BS

PhD student, Toyo-oka Lab
smb538@drexel.edu

Education:
Sara earned her BS in neuroscience from the University of Scranton. She is a PhD student in Dr. Kazu Toyo-oka’s lab.

Research:
The lab researches neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex.

Andrey Borisyuk, BS, BA

Andrey Borisyuk, BS, BA

MS student, Giszter Lab
apb323@drexel.edu

Education:
Andrey graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of science and bachelor of arts from Belmont University in 2013 with majors in neuroscience and German. He entered into the Drexel University graduate program in fall 2017 pursing an MS in neuroscience.

Current research:
Investigating neurorobotic rehabilitation strategies to promote motor function recovery and to access spinal cord reorganization after spinal cord injury with Dr. Simon Giszter and his lab team.

Research interests:
Spinal cord injury, neuroengineering, neuroprosthetics, neurorobotics, brain machine interface, neuromechanics, neurorehabilitation.

Silvia Fernandes, BS

Silvia Fernandes, BS

PhD student, Hou Lab
sdf72@drexel.edu

Education:
Silvia Fernandes is a current PhD student in the Neuroscience program.

Research:
Her project primarily focuses on in vivo cellular reprogramming following spinal cord injury. She will continue to do her PhD studying cardiac dysfunction following spinal cord injury in the Hou Lab.

Shrobona Guha, MS

Shrobona Guha: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD Candidate, Baas Lab
sg3536@drexel.edu

Education:
Shrobona is currently a PhD candidate in the Neuroscience program working in Dr. Peter Baas’s Lab at Drexel University. She earned an MS in biotechnology from St. Xavier’s College, Kolkata. in India and she worked on the neuronal circuit development of zebrafish for a year at IISER Pune.

Research:
In the Baas Lab, Shrobona's primary research focus is on understanding establishment and preservation of neuronal microtubule array all throughout development. Her project will focus on the role of mitotic motor proteins in the regulation of the dynamic behaviors of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Microtubule dynamics are involved in neuronal processes like growth cone turning, axon guidance, neuronal migration and maturation.

Research interests:
Microtubule, motor proteins, neurodevelopment, neurogenesis.

Adam Hall, BS

Adam Hall: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD student
aah347@drexel.edu

Education:
Adam holds a BS in neuroscience and psychology. He is a first-year student on a PhD track.

Research:
Adam is interested in the factors that contribute to regeneration and functional recovery in the spinal cord after injury.

Dana Lengel, MS

Dana Lengel: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD student, Raghupathi Lab
dl822@drexel.edu

Education:
I am currently a fifth-year PhD student in the Raghupathi Lab. I am originally from long island, New York. I received my bachelor’s degree in psychology from Queens College and then completed a master’s degree in neuroscience from Stony Brook University.

Research:
My overall research interests include brain injury, stress, early life adversity and sex differences. My dissertation project is focused on investigating the role of glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction within the hippocampus on vulnerability to stress and cognitive deficits following pediatric traumatic brain injury.

Dillon C. Malloy

Dillon Malloy

PhD student, Côté Lab
dcm332@drexel.edu

Education:
Dillon graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor of science in health and exercise science from Pfeiffer University in spring 2017. He entered the Drexel University Neuroscience graduate program in fall 2017 and joined the lab of Dr. Marie-Pascale Côté.

Research:
Dillon’s research focuses on the neuromodulation of spinal networks with noninvasive transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) after spinal cord injury (SCI). The mechanisms and neuroplastic changes underlying the positive effects of tSCS on functional recovery remains to be determined. Therefore, Dillon’s project aims to decrease spasticity after SCI and investigate potential mechanisms involved with this recovery by using tSCS as an activity-based rehabilitation therapy to restore reflex inhibition.

Research interests:
Rehabilitation, activity-based therapy, exercise, electrical stimulation, neuromodulation, neuroplasticity, neurotrauma, reflexes, locomotion, spinal cord injury, chloride homeostasis.

Joya Maser, BA

Joya Maser: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD student
jm4755@drexel.edu

Education:
In 2020, Joya received a BA in neuroscience with a minor in psychology from Franklin & Marshall College. She is currently a first-year neuroscience PhD student in the Drexel University graduate program.

Research interests:
Systems and behavioral neurobiology.

Taylor McCorkle, MS

Taylor McCorkle

PhD student, Raghupathi Lab
tam369@drexel.edu

Education:
Taylor attended to University of Pennsylvania for undergraduate education, where she received her BA in biology with a minor in psychology. She then came into the Drexel Neuroscience program as a master's student and received this degree in May of 2020. She has now transferred into the PhD program.

Research:
In her first two years in the Raghupathi Lab, Taylor has researched sex differences in behavioral outcomes following repetitive mild traumatic brain injury in adolescent rats. As she begins her third year she will focus on novel mechanisms through which hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment and depression are expressed post-injury in male and female rats. She is particularly interested in the role of corticotrophin releasing factor as a neuromodulator of acetylcholine synthesis and release within the medial septum and nucleus accumbens.

Jenna McGrath, BS

Jenna McGrath: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD student
jrm472@drexel.edu

Education:
I have a bachelor of science in behavioral neuroscience with a minor in psychology from Lehigh University. I am a first-year PhD student.

Research interests:
I am most interested in neurodegenerative diseases but have interests in addiction and the reward pathway as well.

Hemalatha Muralidharan, MS

Hemalatha Muralidharan, BS, MS

PhD student, Baas Lab
hm429@drexel.edu

Education:
Hema is a currently a doctoral student in the Neuroscience program working in Dr.Peter Baas’s Lab at Drexel University. She earned a BS in advanced biotechnology from Madras University, India. She also finished her MS in human genetics in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, before joining Drexel’s program in 2015.

Research:
In the Baas Lab, Hema's primary research focus is on understanding establishment and preservation of neuronal microtubule array all throughout development. She particularly focuses on understanding the repurposed role of mitotic motor proteins in the regulation of the dynamic behaviors of the microtubule cytoskeleton that result in establishment of the neuronal microtubule array. Understanding the role of mitotic motor regulation on the neuronal microtubule array can help in developing strategies for neurodegeneration and neurodevelopmental diseases.

Research interests:
Microtubule, motor proteins, neurodevelopment, neurogenesis.

Ashley Opalka, BS

Ashley Opalka

PhD student, Wang Lab
ano43@drexel.edu

Education:
Ashley graduated with a BS and honors from the University of Scranton in 2017 with a double major in neuroscience and biology and a minor in biochemistry. She joined the department in fall 2017 as a research assistant in the Wang Lab and began the graduate program in fall 2019, remaining in the Wang Lab to pursue a PhD in neuroscience.

Research:
Ashley is interested in how brain oscillations and unique patterns of neural ensemble activity can initiate and influence the process of memory consolidation in mice, which occurs during sleep. She utilizes extracellular electrophysiology and optogenetics in freely behaving mice to determine the neural mechanisms that store our long-lasting memories. She hopes to expand our understanding of how the brain integrates experiences to properly respond to our environment, which can have a wide impact on amnestic, psychiatric, pathological and addiction disorders.

Research interests:
Learning, memory, memory consolidation, sleep neurobiology, systems neurobiology, information processing.

Micaela O'Reilly, BS

Micaela O'Reilly: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD Candidate, Tom Lab
mlo44@drexel.edu

Education:
Micaela graduated with a bachelor of Science from the University of Vermont in Spring 2016 with a major in neuroscience. She entered the Drexel University graduate program in neuroscience during the fall of 2017 and joined the lab of Dr. Veronica Tom pursuing a PhD in neuroscience.

Research:
Micaela’s research involves therapeutically targeting specific factors within the neuroimmune system to modulate plasticity following spinal cord injury. She is interested in exploring how such neuroimmune activity and plasticity contributes to changes in the spinal sympathetic reflex (SSR) circuit and the development of sympathetic hyperreflexia (indicated by autonomic dysreflexia) and resultant dysimmunity.

Research interests:
Spinal cord injury, neurotrauma, neuroinflammation/neuroimmune response, neuroplasticity.

Ankita Patil, MS

Ankita Patil: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD Candidate, Baas Lab
ap3326@drexel.edu

Education:
Ankita graduated with her BSc in life sciences from the University of Mumbai, India, in 2014. She received her master’s in neuroscience from Drexel University in 2017 and is currently pursuing her PhD in neuroscience, also at Drexel University, in the laboratory of Dr. Peter W. Baas.

Current research:
Ankita’s dissertation project focuses on microtubule organization in the neuronal axon. Axons have a particularly uniform organization of their microtubules, but how the neuron is able to orchestrate and maintain this is an open question. She is investigating two molecular interactions – motor proteins and cross-linking proteins – and how these interactions influence microtubule orientation and sliding. The overarching goal of the project is to contribute toward a model of the regulation of microtubule organization in the axon. A better understanding of this mechanism could further research in disease states where axonal microtubules are perturbed.

Research interests:
Cytoskeleton, microtubules, neuronal cell biology, microscopy.

Breanne Pirino, MS

Breanne Pirino: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD student, Barson Lab
bep46@drexel.edu

Education:
Breanne earned her BS in neuroscience and Spanish from Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 2013 and her MS in neuroscience from Drexel University in 2020, before transitioning to the PhD program.

Research:
Breanne’s research focuses on the role of the kappa-opioid receptor system in voluntary alcohol drinking and its subregional differences within the nucleus accumbens of rats. Classically, this receptor system and its ligand, dynorphin, have been understood to have dysphoric effects and enhance alcohol drinking; however, this project explores how, in the rostral subregion, activation of these receptors can suppress alcohol drinking. Future projects will explore how this effect may change with the development of dependence.

Research interests:
Ethanol use, nucleus accumbens subregions, kappa-opioid receptors, microinjections .

Margo Randelman, BS

Margo Randelman, BS

PhD student, Lane Lab
mlr357@drexel.edu

Education:
Margo graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor of science from Ursinus College in spring 2015 with a double major in neuroscience and biology. She entered into the Drexel University graduate program in fall 2015 and joined the lab of Dr. Michael Lane pursuing a PhD in neuroscience.

Current research:
Enhancing intrinsic neuroplasticity through respiratory rehabilitation to improve breathing following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). After cervical spinal cord injury there is damage to the phrenic circuit, which impairs diaphragm function and therefore respiration. Daily acute hypercapnia training (dAIHc) is the respiratory rehabilitation technique used to drive intrinsic plasticity and strengthen the phrenic circuit for improved respiratory function following injury.

Research interests:
Neurotrauma, spinal cord injury, rehabilitation, biomaterial engineering, neuroplasticity and respiration.

Kyle Samson, BS

Kyle Samson: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

MD/PhD Student, España Lab
ks3625@drexel.edu

Education:
Kyle completed his BS in biology from Canisius College in 2017. He began at Drexel in 2018 in the MD program and transferred into the MD/PhD program in the summer of 2019 to join Dr. Rodrigo España’s lab.

Current research:
Kyle is currently using an oxycodone (a prescription opioid) self-administration paradigm to model drug craving following abstinence periods. He uses fast scan cyclic voltammetry to determine dopaminergic changes associated with exaggerated oxycodone craving. He plans to manipulate the hypocretin system to attenuating oxycodone craving and to modulate dopamine transmission.

Research interests:
Substance use disorder, opioid use disorder, dopamine transmission, mechanism of action of opioids.

Pryscilla Santos Acevedo, BA

Pryscilla Santos Acevedo: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

MS student
ps956@drexel.edu

Education:
I am originally from Florida. I received a BA in psychology and am now a first-year student at Drexel pursuing an MS in neuroscience.

Research interests:
Traumatic brain injury, the dopamine pathway, addiction and neurodegenerative diseases.

Meredith Singer, BS

Meredith Singer: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

MS student, Detloff Lab
ms3767@drexel.edu

Education:
Meredith earned her bachelor’s degree in health sciences from Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions. She is a third-year master's student in the Molecular Medicine program at Drexel University College of Medicine and a member of the Detloff Lab.

Current research:
Meredith is currently working on developing a software program that automates extracting axon features from fluorescent images.

Research interests:
Spinal cord injury, neuropathic pain, neuroplasticity, mitochondria, bioenergetics, nociceptors, exercise, automated image processing.

Shayna Singh, BS

Shayna Singh: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD student, Dougherty Lab
sps84@drexel.edu

Education:
I graduated from Drexel University in 2019 and did undergraduate research in the lab of Dr. Michael Akins. I studied how proteins related to fragile X syndrome were positioned in the spinal cord to influence motor and sensory deficits seen in fragile X syndrome and autism. I majored in biology but earned a minor in STEM education that allowed me to teach science in Philadelphia classrooms.

Current research:
How interneurons that contribute to rhythmogenesis behave during locomotion and across development. My goal is to use genetic and electrophysiological tools to better understand the mechanism of rhythmogenesis within the neonatal and adult spinal cord. Understanding the role that specific rhythm-generating interneurons play in the spinal cord may better inform therapeutic targets following injury and would contribute to our understanding of locomotion at cellular and network levels.

Research interests:
Spinal cord, interneurons, patch clamp electrophysiology, locomotion.

Trevor Smith, BS

Trevor Smith

PhD Student, Giszter Lab
tss72@drexel.edu

Education:
Trevor received his BS in biology from Northwest Nazarene University in 2015. Before coming to Drexel to pursue his PhD, he worked for two years as an intramural research trainee fellow at the NIH. He is a graduate student in the laboratory of Dr. Simon Giszter.

Current research:
Trevor's research focuses on the spinal cord's intrinsic capacity to structure and pattern movement. Owing to their unique physiology, frogs can chronically survive spinalization while retaining a repertoire of reflexes. Motor control within this model appears to be simplified to the activation of a handful of independent elements, motor modules, which recruit the appropriate muscle synergies. The mechanisms of module recruitment and the neurobiological basis for modules remains largely unknown. Understanding these mechanisms will clarify the role of supraspinal centers in motor control and may guide rehabilitation for motor deficits after disease or injury.

Research interests:
Spinal cord injury, neuroengineering, sensorineural integration, comparative motor control.

Nicholas Stachowski, MS

Nicholas Stachowski: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD student, Detloff Lab
njs83@drexel.edu

Education:
I earned a BS in neuroscience and a BA history from the University of Delaware. I started in the MS program in Neuroscience at Drexel in 2016 with Dr. Dougherty and graduated in 2018. After a year as a technician with Dr. Dougherty, I entered the PhD program with advanced standing as a third-year candidate. I will complete my thesis project under Dr. Dougherty's mentorship.

Current research:
Accessing spinal central pattern generator circuitry to restore hindlimb motor function after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) in mouse. I am implementing epidural stimulation with viral therapy to promote post-SCI recovery and investigating the role of an identified population of inhibitory interneurons in the recovery process.

Research interests:
Electrophysiology, spinal reflexes and motor control.

Cameron Trueblood, BS

Cameron Trueblood: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD candidate, Hou Lab
ctt35@drexel.edu

Education:
Cameron Trueblood graduated cum laude from Hampton University in 2011 with a bachelor of arts degree in psychology. She enrolled at Drexel University in 2014 to pursue her PhD in neuroscience.

Current research:
Cameron's research involves mitigating cardiovascular dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI) by grafting serotonergic progenitors into the lesion site. After high-level SCI, patients lose supraspinal control of their cardiovascular system, resulting in resting hemodynamic disorders and the development of autonomic dysreflexia. Serotonin originating from the caudal raphe nucleus in the brainstem is a major regulatory component of cardiovascular function. Therefore, transplanting cells with an enriched population of serotonergic progenitors may be a viable strategy for restoring hemodynamic regulation after SCI.

Research interests:
Neurotrauma, spinal cord injury, serotonin, cardiovascular function, transplantation.

John Walker, MS

John Walker: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

PhD candidate, Detloff Lab
jw3646@drexel.edu

Education:
John graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of science from The Catholic University of America in spring 2018 with a major in biomedical engineering and a minor in neuroscience. He entered in the Drexel University Neuroscience graduate program in fall 2018 and joined the lab of Dr. Megan Detloff, where he completed his MS in neuroscience in 2020, before transitioning into the PhD program.

Current research:
Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) suffer a loss of motor and sensory function. The current standard of care to recover fine motor control is rehabilitation focused on a combination of range of motion, aerobic, and strength training (ST). However, limited research has been conducted to determine the role of nociceptive afferent inputs from muscle on spinal plasticity and/or recovery of function. Using a rodent model of SCI with ST rehabilitation, the Detloff Lab determined that motor training not only improves forelimb strength and fine motor function but also can modulate the development of neuropathic pain. John is investigating whether these improvements in reaching and grasping may be due, in part, to the plasticity of nociceptive afferents.

Research interests:
Neurotrauma, spinal cord injury, rehabilitation, neuroplasticity and motor control.

Mariah Wulf, BS

Mariah Wulf: Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy

MS student
mjw458@drexel.edu

Education:
I graduated with from the University of Nebraska at Omaha with a BS in psychology and a concentration in behavioral neuroscience along with a BS in Neuroscience. I am currently a first-year student on the MS tract at Drexel University.

Research interests:
I am interested in examining the regenerative capabilities in the motor centers of the brain and the spinal cord in order to produce motor behavior after injury..

Shasha Yang, MS

Shasha Yang, MS

PhD student, Gao Lab
sy458@drexel.edu

Education:
Shasha Yang graduated with a master’s degree in science from Capital Normal University, China in 2017, with a major in fundamental psychology. She entered into the Drexel University graduate program in fall 2017 and joined the lab of Dr. Wen-Jun Gao to pursue a PhD in neuroscience.

Current research:
The mediodorsal thalamus (MD) plays a critical role in cognition through its extensive glutamatergic innervation on both excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). By combining optogenetic technique with transgenic Cre mouse lines and whole cell path-clamp recording, we aim to characterize the function of the potential projection from the MD to PV+, VIP+ and SOM+ interneurons in the mouse PFC.

Research interests:
Prefrontal cortex, interneurons, mediodorsal thalamus, optogenetic, whole cell patch-clamp.

Philip Yates, BA

Philip Yates, BA

MD/PhD student, Baas Lab
ply23@drexel.edu

Education:
Phil graduated with a bachelor of arts from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, in spring 2011 with a major in biology and a minor in neuroscience. Phil entered into the MD/PhD program at Drexel University College of Medicine in the summer of 2015, and joined the lab of Dr. Peter Baas in the summer of 2017 to pursue a PhD in neuroscience.

Current research:
Phil is differentiating human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into neurons to study Gulf War Illness (GWI), a chronic multisystem disorder suffered by 250,000 veterans of the 1990-1991 Gulf War. Phil is investigating how pathology of the microtubule-associated protein tau might serve as a mechanism underlying microtubule-based deficits in neurons exposed to Gulf War neurotoxicants, as well as tau- and microtubule-based therapies for GWI. Phil is also generating hiPSC-derived cerebral organoids to model the disease in 3D culture.

Research interests:
Neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, Gulf War illness, stem cells, microtubules, tau, and microtubule-based therapies for cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders.

 
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Enlarged neuronet, glassy texture.