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Scholars

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2019 Dornsife Scholars

Aditi Bawa (Sophomore, Science Policy Major, Penoni Honors College), a Spring and Summer Term Coop Scholar, will be spending six months in Zambia. Her passion for science policy comes from a belief in evidence-based science affecting public policies that impact society for the better. By pursuing a highly interdisciplinary major that draws from classes in biotechnology, public policy, public health, ethics, and law, she is interested in understanding the ways that WASH can be integrated into policymaking at the local level. As a Dornsife Global Development Scholar, Aditi hopes to further this understanding and explore first-hand the connection between local WASH policies and implementation into everyday lives. She is excited to unravel what it truly means to be a "global citizen" by approaching her co-op with a multifaceted lens and using a bottum-up approach to bring clean water to everyone.

Allie Eastus (Junior, Public Health Major, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Spring Term Coop Scholar, will be spending three months in Eswatini. She is interested in the development of sustainable health systems and health policies that promote health as a universal human right. Allie is looking forward to integrating community-based practices in the field and working alongside World Vision staff to address designing programs for behavior change. In addition to her experience with qualitative research, Allie hopes to further her skills and knowledge of quantitative data. Importantly, she anticipates that she will be able to use these skills in support of the translation process to policy. Based on the courses she has taken thus far, Allie is aiming to understand the health outcomes in Eswatini using the Social Ecological Model (SEM). She aspires to use this model to address health outcomes from various levels of influence.

Briana Guillory (First-year Master's Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending three months in Lesotho. Briana's interest in global health stems from understanding that the world is interconnected through the environment. Our environment is not localized but globalized through natural processes. Improving the environment of one community is the pathway to improving communities around the globe. Briana is excited about being able to be on the ground, doing the heavy lifting and diving deeper into the specific health issues in Lesotho. Furthermore, Briana would like to gain a better understanding of the underlying causes of today's health crisis form a localized perspective; how to create and sustain healthy communities; and how to promote healthy behaviors. Briana intends to use her training in environmental science in conjunction with her passion for the differing narratives of others to empower communities and to assist communities in achieving healthier lifestyles and behaviors.

Christiana Obeng, (First-year Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending six weeks in Lesotho. Christiana’s interests in global health aligns with Tom Frieden’s, who once said “I loved clinical science, but in public health you can impact more than one person at a time. The whole society is your patient.” Christiana appreciates the methodical and in-depth training that she receives through her medical training. However, she believes that by coupling her medical knowledge with large-scale preventative and cost-effective measures, implemented through public health models, she can have a much wider and long-lasting impact as a future physician. Christiana is looking forward to being immersed in the rich culture of Lesotho and learning of the traditions and norms of the people of Lesotho. Globally, there is an alarming rate of maternal mortality, especially in low-income countries. Christiana hopes to further her understanding of the social determinants of maternal health disparities in such countries. She hopes to join efforts which target audiences such as traditional leaders of societies that endorse child marriages, to discuss how such marriages could further increase the risk of maternal mortality in young mothers.

Cierra Bryant (First-year Master's Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending three months in Lesotho. Cierra is passionate about global health and believes that everyone should have the same opportunities to achieve optimal health. Cierra is eager to work with various communities in Lesotho and to witness them reach this level of optimal health with clean water and improved sanitation practices. She hopes to strengthen her understanding of menstrual hygiene management and how that can be used to improve sanitation conditions. She is enthusiastic about being submerged in a new environment with new cultural norms and practices. Her open mind will guide her as she collaborates with World Vision Lesotho.

Francis Song (Junior, Health Sciences Major, College of Nursing and Health Professions), a Spring and Summer Term Co-op Scholar, will be spending six months in Zambia. He is interested in the betterment of human health and the enhancement of a sustainable lifestyle. Furthermore, he believes that the improvement of global health will significantly improve overall global development. He looks forward to providing a meaningful impact and experiencing the beautiful country of Zambia first-hand. He plans to further expand his knowledge of global health and working in international settings. Francis is a passionate learner and hopes to provide a memorable service in all of his work. 

Jerusalem Tamire (Sophomore, Economics Major, Lebow College of Business), a Spring Term Co-op Scholar, will be spending three months in Eswatini. Her interest in global health comes from her passion for healthcare policy in low-income countries. Having grown up in Ethiopia, she acknowledges the impact of underprivileged healthcare services. This motivates her aim to improve policy so that all can receive free and adequate care. In Eswatini, she looks forward to broadening her knowledge and perspective while working alongside some great African minds at World Vision. Her interests in behavioral economics and neuroscience will immerse her into the Design for Behavioral Change program.

Katherine Boyd (Medical Student, College of Medicine) a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending six weeks in Zambia. Kat is passionate about partnering with communities and making sustainable changes that will be carried on by the people who benefit from them. She is particularly excited by opportunities to improve and expand public health offerings within communities. Kat is looking forward to learning more about Zambia’s culture and better understanding how health programs are implemented and maintained within this cultural context. Her collaboration with World Vision will be guided by a strong desire to learn about development work within Zambia and build relationships that strengthen the partnerships between community and World Vision. In addition to serving the people of Zambia, she hopes to build a skill set that will further her own career goals of providing healthcare to underserved populations, and working with the systems that provide it in order to fundamentally better them.

Matthew Wabwire (Freshman, Public Health Major, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2019 Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending three months in Malawi. His interests in global health stem from his experience with hygiene improvement schemes for adolescent girls in Kenya, and his research in socioeconomic disparities, antenatal healthcare and delivery services in Uganda. Within the field of public health, his has formed a keen interest in the study of social epidemiology. During his time in Malawi, Matthew looks forward to applying his current knowledge and cultural intelligence to the various community projects he will engage with. He is hopeful that through his previous experiences, more opportunities for cross-cultural communication and knowledge of the stakeholders within these projects, he will be able to make an invaluable contribution to the Designing for Behavioral Change framework for World Vision in Malawi.

Maxine Davis (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending three months in Zambia. Her interest in global health steams from her passion for empowering underrepresented communities while being immersed in new cultures. Maxine is looking forward to strengthening her understanding of the relationship between behavior change and current practices for water and sanitation hygiene to ultimately improve health outcomes for the community.

Sebastien Trott (First Year, Drexel University College of Medicine) a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending six weeks in Malawi. He is passionate about Global Health, particularly in preventative medicine and improving access to care in communities where health systems are underdeveloped. While access to healthcare has significant room for improvement both domestically and abroad, Sebastien’s interests in navigating cultural and language barriers in delivering this care have driven him to a more globally-focused career path. He is excited to expand his medical training by gaining hands-on experience in the field and a more globally nuanced understanding of social determinants of health. Sebastien’s technical knowledge and mindset will help him and his team take a systematic approach of identifying and creating solutions to the challenges they will encounter.

2018 Dornsife Scholars

 Timi

Timilehin Adedokun (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months working with World Vision Lesotho in Teyateyaneng, Berea Area Development Program, which is located in northern region of Lesotho.

Timi designed and conducted interviews with community members (including men) in focus group discussions at schools. With a primary focus on assessing knowledge, attitude, and beliefs, Timi was able to better understand perspectives of menstrual hygiene management (MHM) and educating for school-age girls. Interestingly, Timi found that the schools did provide sanitary pads for girls, yet a more sustainable encouragement was needed to keep girls in school. In this study, Timi encouraged men to be the focus of sustainable MHM community-led projects.

Amid this work, her most memorable moment was the impact this had on the interest that fathers had in their daughter’s health. Timi recalls a focus group discussion with two groups—fathers and non-father—and realized bringing the overall impact to men was huge in scaling this project throughout the community.

Ewurama
Ewurama Amoonua Adenu-Mensah (BS/MS, College of Engineering), a Spring-Summer Term Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months working with World Vision Ghana in Tamale, Northern Region at the GI-WASH Operation Base.

Ewurama assessed the progress of Sustainable Development Goal 6.1 (equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water) in the Gbumgbum community in the Savelugu District. Ewurama also designed and executed household surveys as well as performed water quality sampling (E. coli presence testing) to determine how far the community had come in reaching the goals, and presented some recommendations to World Vision Ghana on how to proceed in achieving the goal by 2030.

One of the most impactful moments of this experience was when she realized, firsthand, how her research directly impacted lives of individuals and families, and how grateful she was to partake in World Vision's amiable mission.

Jordan

Jordan Beck, (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a Co-op Scholar, spent six months working with World Vision Mozambique in Nampula within the Nacaroa and Mucate ADPs in the northern region of Mozambique.

Jordan spent his time examining and evaluating the implementation and long-term sustainability of World Vision's behavior change model in the southern Africa region. In addition, Jordan also worked on an initiative that focused on ways to make World Vision's programs more inclusive for women and individuals with limited abilities.

One of the most impactful moments of this experience for Jordan was receiving feedback from field technicians that recommendations he made for disability-inclusive latrines were being implemented and would have a positive impact for the entire community.

Gabrielle

Gabrielle Brizzi (Undergraduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months working with World Vision eSwatini in the Gege Area Program within the Shiselweni region in the southern portion of the country.

Gabrielle concentrated primarily on nutrition and early childhood development in her project as she evaluated World Vision eSwatini’s Timed and Targeted Counseling (ttC) program. The ttC program focuses on reducing maternal and child morbidity and mortality in rural communities using a storybook method that teaches lessons on healthy behaviors. Gabrielle conducted interviews with ttC beneficiaries, facilitators, and clinicians in order to assess its impact and to identify potential gaps. Gabrielle provided recommendations on ways to improve the ttC program in areas like male involvement, early childhood development, family planning, and water, sanitation, and hygiene. In addition to her work with the ttC program, Gabrielle also participated in child sponsorship recruitment events and spent time working in primary schools on HIV prevention and education.

Being able to engage with community members and learn about how impactful the ttC program has been on their health and overall quality of living was the most impactful aspect of her experience.

Imani

Imani Calloway-Ennis (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a Co-op Scholar, spent sic months working with World Vision Zambia in Choma within the Moyo/Hamaundu ADP in the Southern Province of the country.

Imani conducted interviews with women to gather information regarding their participation in community water point committees and their feelings about their roles in these committees as well as within their communities as a whole. In addition, Imani also observed and evaluated the effectiveness of different aspects of World Vision’s donor visits and marketing strategies.

One of the most impactful moments of this experience was hearing the impact stories of the children at Kanchomba school about how the WASHUP! program helped them be able to live healthy, happy lives by making sure they have access to clean water.

Margot

Margot Debrabandere (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent six weeks working with World Vision Swaziland (WVS) in Nhlangano within the Maseyesini ADP in the Shiselweni Region of the country.

Margot evaluated the impact of WVS’s HIV Prevention Program on young women’s knowledge, beliefs, behavior, and attitude toward sexual health, HIV/AIDS, and people living with HIV/AIDS. Focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews were conducted with key players within the program, such as the enrolled girls and women, Youth Facilitators, and WVS health outreach partners, including Médecins Sans Frontières and the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation.

The most impactful moments of the experience included attending various community health awareness events, and seeing how these gatherings not only increased awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS, among other health topics, but also strengthened community bonds and maintained cultural traditions.

Sharon

Sharon Dei-Tumi (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 10 weeks working with World Vision Lesotho in Ha Majane within the Rotthe ADP in the south region of the country.

Due to abject poverty in some parts of Lesotho, many girls are unable to afford disposable sanitary pads during their time of the month, and as such resort to the use of supplementary materials such as sheepskin, old socks, newspapers, tissues, plastic or stay at home to avoid any embarrassment. When faced with similar issues, other African countries such as Uganda, Kenya, Malawi and South Africa resorted to the use of reusable cloth pads made from readily available materials such as t-shirts to help reduce the state of helplessness experienced by girls during the time of their month. Sharon focused on teaching girls how to make these pads from readily available materials such as cotton t-shirts, and how to properly wash these pads to ensure menstrual hygiene management (MHM).

One of the most impactful moments of this experience was seeing the positive reception for the reusable cloth pads. This positive attitude is very promising as the use of reusable pads can supplement present efforts by World Vision Lesotho and Her Majesty Queen ‘Masenate Mohato Seeiso.

Liam

Liam Giberson (Undergraduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months with World Vision Rwanda.

Liam worked collaboratively with two other Scholars in both Kigali and in the Northern Province of Rwanda on water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) behavior change initiatives.

One of the most impactful moments was being able to translate theory into practice, ultimately playing a major role in the growth and development of marginalized populations.

 

Mike

Mike Hauer (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months working with World Vision Rwanda.

Mike had spent an split time in Kigali but also in an Area program in Gakenke, located in the Northern Province of the country. During the beginning of his experience, assisted with an Annual Monitoring of Child Well-Being Indicators data collect process and conducing a water tap functionality and community understanding of water tap maintenance study.

One of the most impactful moments of Mikes experience was attending a community celebration of a new water supply system constructed by World Vision Rwanda. The water supply system provided water to 13,000 people who had never had running water or access to clean water before.

Afrah

Afrah Howlader (Undergraduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months working with World Vision Swaziland in the Shiselweni Region within the Maseyisini and Gege APs in the southwest region of the country.

Afrah conducted an evaluation of World Vision’s HIV Prevention Education efforts in adolescent girls and young women aged 10-24, specifically the Reach Three Project and HIV Risk Assessment Program. Through this, Afrah conducted several focus group discussions and interviews with participating girls, youth facilitators, and nurses in order to assess knowledge acquisition and perceptions among the club members and provide recommendations for the next phase of the project. In addition, Afrah assisted World Vision staff at community health promotion events held at clinics in rural communities.

One of the most impactful moments of this experience was when, at the end of her first club meeting observation, every girl ran up, hugged her, and thanked her for visiting them.

Alexis

Alexis Johnson (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months working with World Vision Lesotho in Berea within Sefikeng in the Southern Region of Lesotho.

Alexis worked on understanding the adverse health brought by El Niño-induced drought. In addition, Alexis also focused on the unrevealing and the demonstration of the new latrine system in participating public schools from a hygiene initiative related project.

Of the most impactful moments of this experience was being able to lead a focus group for village health workers about the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the drought.

J'Anna
J’Anna-Mare Lue 
(Undergraduate, College of Engineering), an iSTAR Scholar, spent two months working with World Vision Lesotho in Sekameng ADP within the Mafateng District in the Southern Region of the country.

J’Anna’s research focused on the effects of the El- Nino-induced drought of 2015-2016 on the community of Sekameng especially the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) infrastructure, as well as community attitudes and knowledge regarding WASH. In addition, Janna researched trends in diarrheal diseases from 2015 to present to determine impacts of drought on health.

One of the most impactful moments of this experience was interacting with the communities where she learned a great deal about Basotho culture.

Gabriella
Gabriella Macera (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), an iSTAR Scholar, spent nine weeks working with World Vision Malawi in Lilongwe within the Central Region of the country.

Gabriella carried out an independent research study focused on the impact of clean water on women and children’s mental and physical health. Her research consisted of household surveys in communities with and without access to clean water.

One particularly poignant experience was the joy women who had benefited from the boreholes installed by World Vision shared with me.

Rhea

Rhea Mathew (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent six weeks working with World Vision Swaziland in Nhalangano within the Shisulweni Area Development Program of Eswatini.

Rhea evaluated the perceived impact of World Vision's ESwatini’s Timed and Targeted Counseling (TTC) Program through interviews with pregnant and lactating women enrolled in the program, as well as with rural health motivators. Her discussions with participants explored TTC’s ability to increase their knowledge of healthy child rearing practices, change behaviors regarding breast feeding and home births, and improve male involvement in child care.

One of the most impactful moments of Rhea's time in ESwatini was when she was able to attend a community health meeting, in which children and teens acted out skits, recited poetry, and gave speeches about the importance of sexual and reproductive health.

Lindsay

Lindsay Morrissey (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a Co-op Scholar, spent three months working with World Vision Senegal in the area near the capital city, Dakar.

While there, Lindsay worked alongside World Vision to develop and administer a survey that evaluated the accessibility of quality WASH services within the community. With these findings, Lindsay helped craft and translate a report to improve the way World Vision implements related projects.

One of the most impactful moments came through the realization of just how import language is in community-level work. It was challenging to work in a country where English was not the primary language, however she focused on strengthening her French to better engage with World Vision and the community members in Senegal.

Steeve

Steeve Ndjila Ndohnwou (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health) a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months with World Vision Rwanda.

Being originally from Cameroon, Central Africa, the issue of access to clean water and proper sanitation facilities in rural parts of Africa has always laid a great burden to his heart. Working in both Kigali and the Northern Province, Steeve learned from and served communities similar to the one he grew up in, while promoting healthy WASH practices and infrastructure.

Alberta

Alberta Nkrumah (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending three months with World Vision Ghana.

She became a Dornsife Global Development Scholar because this opportunity will integrate the knowledge and skills gained in the lecture room into valuable practical experiences through community placements and partnerships. Nkrumah hopes to gain more skills and knowledge from the projects she works on and positively impact the communities that she will be working in.

Leila

Leila Nzekele (Undergraduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, will be spending three months with World Vision Lesotho.

She has a passion for educating people on health awareness; developing health initiatives and changing social health consciousness. From this experience, Nzekele wishes to acquire a deeper understanding of global health from having a firsthand account, apply what she has learned in the classroom to real-world situation, and to learn from the country as a whole: communities, language, and culture.

Kyra

Kyra Sacksith (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a Summer Experience Scholar will be spending three months with World Vision Senegal.

Sacksith enjoys helping people and looks forward to helping people through the water crisis. She looks forward to using a community-based approach to create and implement WASH interventions. Sacksith hopes this experience will prepare her for her career in public health.

Krishna
Krishna Venigalla 
(Undergraduate, Pennoni Honors College), an iSTAR Scholar, will be spending 10 weeks working with World Vision Zambia on a follow-up project from previous Scholars to further the advancement of the commercialization of water systems.

Krishna is looking forward to building on her classroom knowledge to connecting the dots between policy, business planning, and community-level organizing to support World Vision’s approach to sustainable development. She hopes to use the interdisciplinary theory taught in her classes to continue working on global issues that affect marginalized populations.

Betty
Betel Yemane 
(Undergraduate, LeBow College of Business), an iSTAR Scholar, spent two months working with World Vision Malawi in Lilongwe district in the central region of the country.

Betel worked on how to use sanitation as a business. Sanitation as a business is a new concept/approach which involves business entrepreneur and household thereby solving current unhygienic sanitation problem faced by the population. It creates an ongoing relationship between household and entrepreneur providing sanitation services to solve current sanitation problems. She presented a proposal to World Vision on how it can improve its current sanitation approach by comparing with other similar models that were implemented in Malawi.

Along with her research, Betel also organized and raised funds for the former president of Malawi, Joyce Banda’s foundation (JBF). She attended as a guest of honor for a political campaign/donation ceremony where she presented the children with school bags. Through this occasion, she was able to meet her excellency Joyce Banda in person as well. Another important experience for Betel was learning to embrace a different and new culture.

2017 Dornsife Scholars

Theo

Theophilus Abah (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 6 weeks working with World Vision Lesotho in the Butha Buthe region, within the Makhunoane Area Development Program, in the Northern Province of Lesotho.

Theo conducted interviews within households to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and practices and the impact of community led total sanitation campaigns (i.e., recent UNICEF/WASH interventions). 

17 Garcelle

Garcelle Alequine (Graduate Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia within an Area Development program in Mumbwa, located in the Central Province of the country.

Garcelle conducted an impact evaluation within World Vision sponsored communities, to assess the effect of the health and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) projects on the nutritional status of children younger than 5. Interviews were conducted within households to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices and the impact of WASH and health interventions in achieving improved health status of children under 5. 

17 Alia

Alia Barnes (Graduate Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Senegal in Fatick, Senegal within the Fatick Area Development Program.

Alia conducted household surveys and focus groups to evaluate knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards sanitation and the use of Women's Village and Loans Savings Groups to acquire household latrines.
 

Sabrina

Sabrina Charles (Graduate Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Senegal in Kolda, Senegal within the Kolda and Kedougou Nutrition Integration Project, which is in the Southern Region of the country.

Sabrina conducted interviews at the local health centers and within households to assess disease prevalence, nutrition status, and knowledge of mothers within households. Sabrina also focused on sanitation and hygiene behaviors, quality and access to a latrine, and quality and access to drinking water which helped to evaluate the effectiveness of the introduction of WASH methods and interventions and its impact on nutrition to reduce mortality and malnutrition in children.

Austin

Austin Chilembo (Graduate Student, Mzuzu University in Mzuzu, Malawi), an Inbound Research Scholar from World Vision Malawi and also completing his Master of Science in Transformative Community Development at Mzuzu University in Malawi.

Austin visited during the winter 2017 term advancing his research on factors affecting attainment and sustainability of open defecation free (ODF) villages. Additionally, Austin serves as a Monitoring and Evaluation Manager in Northern Malawi with the Malawi integrated Water Sanitation and Hygiene (MiWASH) Technical Program. In this role, Austin has led a variety of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) projects to include: Malawi Literacy for Empowerment Through Action Research and Networking (M- LEARN), Chikwina Mpamba Gravity Water System Project, and the Malawi Maternal New Born and Child Health (M-MNeCH) Technical Program. 

17 Ari

Ariana Downs (Undergraduate Student, College of Arts and Sciences), a summer term Co-op Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Swaziland in the Shiselweni region within the Matsanjeni and Somtongo Area Development Programs.

Ariana conducted interviews and surveys within households and schools to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of menstrual hygiene and girl’s education. She also interviewed community members to understand how the recent WASH interventions positively impacted the lives of school-age youth and their families. 

17 Claudia

Claudia Duguay (Undergraduate Student, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems), a spring-term Co-op Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia in Monzé within the Monzé Area Development Program, which is in the Southern Province of the country.

Claudia conducted interviews with school children to evaluate the effectiveness of the WASH Up! Program. WASH Up! is a program designed through a partnership between Sesame Workshop and World Vision that supports WASH education for primary school children in grade 1 through 4. 

Sachin

Sachin Gandhi (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Research Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Lesotho in Morija, Lesotho within the Matelile and Sekameng Area Development Programs, which are in the Mafeteng District of the country.

Sachin conducted cross-sectional community interviews with individual households and village chief's as well as visited clinics to understand the regional disease burden. The goal of his efforts was to explore the impact of the 2015-2016 drought on WASH practices and the resulting disease burden in the Lesotho lowlands in order to support drought policy, planning, and implementation of mitigation strategies. 

Samy

Samyuktha Guttha (BS/MD Student, College of Arts and Sciences and College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 2 months working with World Vision Lesotho in Berea, Lesotho within the Sefikaneng, Mopoteng, and Koening Area Development Programs (ADP) which are in a Central District of the country.

Samyuktha conducted interviews with healthcare providers within ADP clinics and district level hospitals and World Vision ADP staff to evaluate current attitudes and practices towards opportunistic infections secondary to HIV and investigate how this correlated to community WASH efforts (to better provide World Vision Lesotho with current information to better program). 

17 Greg

Gregory Kunkel (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Research Scholar, spent 2 months working with World Vision Malawi and Mzuzu University in Mzuzu, Northern Region, Malawi.

Greg conducted research on the capacity for adequate and accurate drinking water quality monitoring at all levels of the Malawi Government. In addition, Greg conducted drinking water quality analysis of boreholes and gravity-fed piped water schemes built by World Vision in the Kayezi and Chikwina-Mpamba Area Development Programs (ADP). 

Wes

Wesley Goodman-Levy (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 6 weeks working with World Vision Lesotho in Mohale's Hoek, Lesotho with the Mpharane Area Development Program, which is the southern portion of the country.

Wesley conducted interviews with sangomas (traditional healers) and local villagers to evaluate attitudes and practices regarding HIV disease and the impact the clinics World Vision supports have had on the community.

Shakye

Shakye Jones (Graduate Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Malawi in Mzuzu in the northern region and, within the central region in Lilongwe.

Shakye conducted interviews within health care facilities to evaluate knowledge about policies and procedures surrounding WASH management.

Eunice

Eunice Kamami (Undergraduate Student, College of Arts and Sciences), a spring and summer term Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months working with World Vision Kenya in Nairobi, Kenya at the National Office, which is located in the capitol city of the country.

Eunice conducted interviews within households, community water committees, and schools to evaluate World Vision WASH performance throughout 14 area programs, aided in disaster preparedness for the contentious Kenyan election, and compiled data analysis for the Voices of Children project which aims to air what Kenyan children are most proud of, what makes them sad, and how leaders in the community can aid in creating a higher standard of living for children in the country including improving WASH, enforcing children's rights and ensuring education for all. 

Mariah

Mariah Menanno (Undergraduate Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent three months with World Vision Lesotho working in Cluster 3 –about 45 minutes south of the capital of Maseru.

Mariah co-lead a project relating to the El Niño-induced drought that occurred in the 2015-2016 rainy season in order to determine resulting disease burden and hygiene practices to help inform future policy within World Vision. To inform her project, Mariah conducted interviews in communities and schools and visited clinics to collect quantitative data to analyze. 

Jerry

Jerry Nutor (Graduate Student, College of Nursing and Health Professions), a Research Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia.

As a returning Dornsife Global Development Scholar, Jerry collaborated with World Vision Zambia in Lusaka and Sinazongwe Districts which are in the Lusaka and Southern Provinces respectively to follow up on his previous work in the region. In fulfillment of his dissertation research, Jerry conducted interviews among HIV positive pregnant and breastfeeding women on the impact of water hygiene and sanitation on antiretroviral treatment (ART) medication adherence intention. 

 

17 Elenda

Elenda Nwandu (Undergraduate Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a summer-term Co-op Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Uganda in Kole, Uganda within the Aboke Area Development Program, which is in the Northern Region of the country.

Elenda conducted interviews within households and schools to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and practices and the impact of community led total sanitation campaign in achieving Open Defecation Free (ODF) communities. Elenda also formed a student health club in a primary school to teach kids about topics which impact their health.

Marissa

Marissa Olson (Undergraduate Student, College of Arts and Sciences), a summer term Co-op Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Swaziland in the areas of Matsanjeni, Somntongo, and Siphofaneni, which are in the Shiselweni region of the country.

Marissa co-created a video expressing the ways WASH affects girls' education and menstrual hygiene, interviewed students, teachers, and community members, and created surveys to assess the knowledge girl students have on menstruation and to see what their schools offer pertaining to menstrual hygiene. Additionally, Marissa proposed recommendations regarding best practices for menstrual hygiene for school-age girls.

Tessa

Tessa Pelger (Graduate Student, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Lesotho in Teyateyaneng within the Bera Area Development Program, which is located in Northwestern Lesotho.

Tessa completed surveys within primary schools and high schools to evaluate schools that had renovated latrines versus those that did not, and how the quality of facilities affected children's absenteeism and menstrual health management. 

Noella

Noella Sama (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vison Ghana at the Ghana Integrated-WASH (GI-WASH) Regional Office in Savelugu located in the Northern District.

Noella conducted household surveys in Open Defecation Free (ODF) communities within Bawku West District to assess the impact of Open Defecation Free (ODF) status on the health and well-being of children. The data collected helped to inform program design and implementation of the WASH team.

Velton

Velton Showell (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Ghana in Tamale, Northern, Ghana at the GI-WASH office.

Velton primarily worked in 5 communities within the Saboba Area Development Program, which is also located in the Northern Region of the country. Velton assessed water purification options for households within rural communities located in disaster prone areas. He designed and conducted household surveys to specifically evaluate household knowledge of the Procter & Gamble water purification program.

Another key aspect of his project was carrying out microbial analysis on samples of purified water taken from the households to measure water quality and effectiveness of the implemented program by testing for the presence of E. coli. Velton then analyzed his results and detailed his findings in research report which he presented to the GI-WASH office prior to his departure.

Akshata

Akshata Yalvigi (Undergraduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a spring and summer term Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months working with World Vision Uganda in Northern Uganda within the Aboke Area Development Program.

Akshata worked on integrating World Vision’s sanitation, nutrition, and maternal health programs by conducting house to house interviews concerning issues including sanitation and hygiene, child feeding habits, and adherence to antenatal care. 

2016 Dornsife Scholars

Headshot of Ruby Abaka-Yankson

Ruby Abaka-Yankson (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia in Chipata, Zambia within the Makungwa Area Development Program, which is in the Eastern Province of the country. Ruby conducted interviews within households and schools to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and practices and the impact of community led total sanitation campaign in achieving Open Defecation Free (ODF) communities. Ruby interviewed village members, village headmen, school children and the chief of the chiefdom.

Headshot of Courtney Boyd

Courtney Boyd, (Undergraduate, Pennoni Honors College), a Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months working with World Vision Malawi in Mzuzu, Malawi within the Chikwina-Mpamba Area Development Program, which is in the Northern Zone. Courtney facilitated surveys and other qualitative research within households, community focus groups, and world vision focus groups to measure the willingness to pay for improved water infrastructure and the implications of water management. She focused on the economic viability of sustaining the gravity fed water scheme currently in place in the area program.

Headshot of Giovanna Byrd

Giovanna Byrd, (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a Co-op Scholar, is working with World Vision in Uganda for her Spring/Summer term. Giovanna is a global health advocate who is committed to serving mankind. She has previous experience working on water development projects in low-resource settings with a service organization called People to People.

Headshot of Morgan Flash

Morgan Flash, (Undergraduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Co-op Scholar, is spending his Spring/Summer term in Zambia with World Vision. Inspired by meeting Dana and David Dornsife during the 2014 Jonathan Mann Lecture, Morgan has previously spent time helping to establish water infrastructure in rural Jamaica, in areas surrounding his family compound.

Headshot of Felix Garcia-Weffer

Felix Garcia-Weffer, (Undergraduate, Lebow College of Business), a Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months in Nampula with World Vision Mozambique. There, Felix worked on a borehole assessment project in the Northern Region, which developed into his final project where he assessed current impacts and possible improvements for World Vision Areas of Development Programs (ADPs) in the District of Nampula.

Headshot of Sachin Ghandi

Sachin Ghandi, (BS/MD, College of Medicine), ​a 2016 Summer Experience Scholar, spent 2 months with​ World Vision Zambia in the Sinazongwe Area Development Program in ​the Southern Province of Zambia. Sachin investigated the Exit Strategy of World Vision Zambia in Sinazongwe. He examined initiatives in the Health Sector that would eventually allow for a sustainable departure upon leaving the region. In order to do so, he participated in district summits across Zambia in which transitioning plans were laid down with the help of the community, partners, government, and other stakeholders. Upon compiling this data, Sachin studied the various methods and compared them against indicators of health to identify successful exit tactics.

Headshot of Benjamin Hertford

Benjamin Hertford, (Undergraduate, College of Engineering), a Fall/Winter Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months in Nampula with World Vision Mozambique. There, he evaluated the effectiveness of community-led total sanitation efforts in the Northern Region of the country.

Headshot of Sana Imam

Sana Imam, (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zimbabwe in Murambinda, Zimbabwe within the Buhera Area Development Program, which is the Northeast Zone. Sana conducted surveys within the community to assess the impact of rural sanitation facility construction. She gathered data on the community's financial status and involvement in various World Vision community-based programs to evaluate the impact of a newly implemented WASH program to end open defecation.

Headshot of Kaitlynn Jones

Kaitlynn Jones, (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2016 Dornsife Global Development Scholar, spent 3 months working in conjunction with World Vision Zimbabwe, specifically paired with Limpopo Area Development Program, which is in the southern-most part of the country. Kaitlynn conducted research on the social effects of water point installation in ward 5 of Beitbridge district, specifically focusing on access/usage, gender equality, and health. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods she conducted separate community meetings with women, children, and the health clinic in the ward.  Once the research was completed Kaitlynn compiled a report and presented her findings to representatives from both World Vision Zimbabwe and World Vision USA. In addition to her research, Kaitlynn also monitored latrine construction in rural primary schools, and participated in community stakeholder meetings about gender-based violence and HIV prevention.

Headshot of Katrina Lewis

Katrina Lewis, (Undergraduate, College of Nursing and Health Professions), a Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months working with World Vision Zambia in Chongwe, Zambia within the Kapululwe Area Development Program (ADP). Katrina had the privilege to work on various projects throughout her time in Zambia. The two main programs Katrina focused on was the Sesame WASH UP! Program, which was funded by World Vision Zambia and Sesame Street, and the Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) Program. The Sesame WASH UP! Program focused on using muppets such as Elmo and Rahi to deliver WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) messages to children in rural schools and communities. On a weekly basis, Katrina evaluated the program in all 14 primary schools where WASH UP! was implemented. For MHM, Katrina facilitated a training meeting where school faculty, community members, and even church members were sensitized to the concept of menstruation. The main highlight of the training was the teaching of how to make reusable pads from materials they had at home. In addition to this, Katrina got to be a part of the planning of an Open Defecation Free (ODF) Day for a village.

Headshot of Evan Newcomer

Evan Newcomer, (Undergraduate, College of Engineering), a 2016 Co-op Scholar, spent 6 months working with World Vision Malawi in Mzuzu, Malawi within the Chikwina-Mpamba Area Program, which is in the northern zone.  Evan worked with local project partners to design and conduct a study assessing the potential for domestic greywater reuse in rural, low-income communities, to reduce the burden of collecting potable water.  The study consisted of administering household surveys throughout the Chikwina-Mpamba area and collecting and testing greywater samples for the presence of Total Coliform and E. coli.  In addition to the greywater study, which was his main focus, Evan also tested community water points for bacterial contamination and created a map showing areas with high health risks, for World Vision and community stake holders to use.

Headshot of Jerry John Nutor

Jerry John Nutor, (Nursing, College of Nursing and Health Professions), a 2016 Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia in Sinanongwe, within the Sinazongwe Area Development Program, which is in the Southern Province of Zambia. Jerry conducted several health education program for pregnant women, breastfeeding mothers and community health volunteers on prevention of malaria, prevention of STIs and HIV, family planning, breastfeeding, personal hygiene and importance of maintaining good sanitation. He focused on improving breastfeeding practices among mothers at the community level where he designed a tool for educating mothers to improve attachment during breastfeeding. In addition to this, Jerry also developed interest in examining factors influencing adherence and retention in care of pregnant women tested positive for HIV.

Headshot of Kehinde Ogebule

Kehinde Ogebule, (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working within World Vision Mozambique in Gaza, Mozambique within the Chibuto and Chivongoene Area Development Program in the Southern Zone. Kehinde assessed the aftereffects of installing boreholes in several communities. By conducting surveys in households, high schools and community clinics, Kehinde assessed the impact of WASH initiatives in relation to the new infrastructure. Kehinde also investigated how community members utilize the benefit of having potable water by assessing what daily activities that are productive to improve their quality of life--for instance child education, agriculture and construction. In addition, Kehinde also supported the Malaria project to evaluate healthcare providers, teachers and health committee's efforts in community education on Malaria prevention methods.

Headshot of Paulina Ramirez

Paulina Ramirez, (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Mozambique in both the Xai-Xai and Chibuto Districts in the Southern Region of Mozambique. Paulina conducted surveys within households, at middle schools, and at health centers to understand behavior change and impact MozWASH initiatives have had in the region. She focused on learning the factors of implementation of water boreholes, and the importance of a community dynamics as it relates to improved water infrastructure. Paulina assessed community perspectives on the importance of sustainable water resources and its relationship to health and sanitation. In addition to this, Paulina worked on a major malaria prevention project where volunteers and school-age youth from the community are taught ways to prevent malaria, and then empowered to teach other community members those lessons.

Headshot of Sarah Robitaille

Sarah Robitaille, (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia in Monze, Zambia within the Choongo Area Development Program, which is in the Southern Province. Sarah conducted surveys within schools to measure the impact of WASH on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) and female student absenteeism. She compiled reports on existing resources in the community and how WASH can formally integrate MHM into its program.

Headshot of Anamika Saha

Anamika Saha, (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia in Monze, Zambia with the Choongo Area Development Program, which is in the Southern Province. Anamika conducted interviews with mothers with children under age five to examine the impact of water, hygiene and sanitation(WASH) initiatives as they relate to a recent cholera outbreak that affected Monze. In addition, Anamika facilitated one of the regional summits which encompassed community representatives that spanned all age groups from 4 villages. The summit was held to learn of community specific limitations within the villages, as well as to develop a plan for World Vision to better address these issues.

Headshot of Shedane Shaw

Shedane Shaw, (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Zambia in Chipata, at the Makungwa ADP is in the Eastern Province. Shedane conducted field research to evaluate the impact of a community-led total sanitation open defecation free campaign that was initiated in 2012. Her work involved the creation and administration of a qualitative survey that assessed the change in knowledge of and attitudes toward open defecation in community residents, school children, headmen, and the chief in the Madzimawe chiefdom. Shedane's findings and field date were translated into a qualitative research submitted on behalf of World Vision Zambia.

Headshot of Svenja Schneider

Svenja Schneider, (Medical Student, College of Medicine), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Senegal in Kolda, Senegal within the Mampatim Area Development Program, which is in the Southern Region. Svenja conducted home visits and administered questionnaires to evaluate the efficacy of Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS). Through comparison of defecation practices, hygiene and contamination understanding, and hand-washing practices, she was able to show the success of CLTS in eliciting lasting behavior change and also identify barriers to change and elements of the program that need improvement.

Headshot of Alexandra Skula

Alexandra Skula, (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a Summer Experience Scholar, spent 3 months working with World Vision Ghana at the Ghana Integrated - WASH (GI-WASH) Regional Office in Savelugu in Ghana's Northern District. Alex conducted focus groups to compare communities that had been certified as Open Defecation Free and communities that practiced open defecation to determine how they differ in knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. Comparisons across communities that were and were not triggered with Community Led Total Sanitation efforts were made as well. Additionally, Alex supported the Monitoring and Evaluation department of the GI-WASH office in report writing and documentation, as well as compiling materials for Ghana's Sesame Street WASH Up! program.

Headshot of Mom Tatah Mentan

Mom “Nini” Tatah Mentan, (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2016 Research Scholar, spent three weeks in Rwanda with World Vision advancing some of her previous work she led as a 2015 Scholar. Nini returned to Rwanda to complete her master’s thesis work assessing the health impact of WASH on orphans and vulnerable children in Mugombwa Refugee Camp.

2015 Dornsife Scholars

StephannieAchaMorfawScholarBioPic

Meinkeng Stephannie Acha-Morfaw (Graduate, College of Medicine), a 2015 Scholar, worked in Karongi, Rwanda within the Byiringiro Area Development Program, which is in the Western Zone. Stephannie conducted surveys within households, at schools, health centers and community hygiene clubs to measure the impact of WASH on children's health, children's education, and the economic impact to the children's families. She focused on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) where she compiled reports on existing resources for the community and how WASH can formally integrate MHM into its program.

 

OyinAdereleScholarBioPic

Oyinkansola Aderele (Undergraduate, College of Engineering), a 2015 Scholar, spent her spring/summer co-op working with the Mazabuka community in Zambia. Oyin worked with the Mazabuka Area Development Program improving boreholes. She also offered on suggestions for more efficient drilling practices, while educating the communities on rehabilitation and maintenance.


Ruth Boansi

Ruth Boansi(Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2015 Scholar, worked within the Southern Africa Region in Zambia. She assisted the Sinazongwe Area Development Program with several of their WASH education initiatives. Most notably, Ruth evaluated the health and social markers of communities with successful Mechanized Water Systems.

 

Christina Bowles

Christina Bowles (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2015 Scholar, worked in Chipinge, Zimbabwe helping the Chipinge Area Development Program, evaluating ways to increase the sustainability of the functionality of water points with an emphasis on improving the functionality of water point committees.

 

Heidi Elnathan 

Heidi Elnathan (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2015 Scholar, worked in Lugazi, Uganda helping the World Vision Mukono/Buikwe Cluster office assess hand hygiene among health workers and the provision of hygiene and sanitation training to new mothers in Health facilities that provide MNCH (Maternal, New Born and Child Health) services.

 

Andy Fox

Andy Fox (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2015 Scholar, worked out of the World Vision office in Savelugu, in Northern Ghana. Andy worked on a project called “Software" where a team of World Vision personnel went into local communities to talk with people about hygiene behavior and the use of latrines, water stations, and other WASH programs. Demonstrations were done using a water treatment product that was developed by Proctor and Gamble.

Itoro Inoyo

Itoro Inoyo (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2015 Scholar, worked in Balaka, Malawi where she supported the World Vision Malawi office, working with both the Ntcheu and Balaka Area Development Programs. Itoro facilitated and assisted in the monitoring and evaluation of ongoing MNCH projects under World Vision's Malawi's WASH office, which focuses on improving health outcomes related to diarrhea, HIV/AIDs, acute respiratory diseases and malaria.

Gregory Kunkel

Gregory Kunkel (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a 2015 Scholar, worked in Tamale, Ghana with the World Vision team in one of the most advanced water treatment labs in the entire continent. At the Regional Water Quality Lab, Greg helped advance a variety of initiatives that the World Vision Tamale Area Development Program currently has underway.

 

Beatrice Mwonga

Beatrice Mwonga (BS/MS, College of Engineering), a 2015 Scholar, returned to her home country of Kenya, to assist the World Vision WASH team in Nairobi on infrastructure enhancements. Her work directly benefited communities that she has grown up in witnessing firsthand the importance of proper WASH infrastructure.

Leah Popek

Leah Popek (Undergraduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2015 Scholar, worked within the Southern Africa Region in Zambia. She assisted the Sinazongwe Area Development Program with several of their WASH education initiatives. Most notably, Leah evaluated the health and social markers of communities with successful Mechanized Water Systems.


Mom Tatah Mentan


Mom “Nini” Tatah Mentan
(Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2015 Scholar, was located in the Karongi District, in the Western Province of Rwanda and worked within the Byiringiro Area Development Program. Nini used survey questionnaires to assess, the health, economic, educational impact of WASH on orphans and vulnerable children. She also used survey questionnaires to evaluate management of water and sanitation infrastructures, community based environmental health programs and WASH in schools.

Tara Tobin 

Tara Tobin (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a 2015 Scholar, completed a successful spring/summer co-op placement in Zambia. Tara worked with the World Vision Choongo Area Development Program leading several projects including improving WASH in schools and WASH education in local communities.

2014 Dornsife Scholars

Valerissa Baker 

Valerissa Baker (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a 2014 Scholar, was the first recipient of the Dornsife Global Development Scholars program. She spent her spring/summer 2014 co-op in Zambia working with World Vision on intervention programs improving hand washing, personal hygiene, and menstrual hygiene practices.

 

Reeti Sharma

Reeti Sharma (Graduate, Dornsife School of Public Health), a 2014 Scholar, was the first international experience recipient of the Dornsife Global Development Scholars program. She spent her summer 2014 term in Malawi working with World Vision and the Mzuzu University collecting data examining water quality in northern Malawi. 

 


Kyra Sacksith (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a Summer Experience Scholar will be spending 3 months with World Vision Senegal. Sacksith enjoys helping people and looks forward to helping people through the water crisis. She looks forward to using a community-based approach to create and implement WASH interventions. Sacksith hopes this experience will prepare her for her career in public health.
Kyra Sacksith (Undergraduate, College of Arts and Sciences), a Summer Experience Scholar will be spending 3 months with World Vision Senegal. Sacksith enjoys helping people and looks forward to helping people through the water crisis. She looks forward to using a community-based approach to create and implement WASH interventions. Sacksith hopes this experience will prepare her for her career in public health.