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DARE Symposium 2017

BRAVE Symposium 2017 05.01.17

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 

On May 1 and 2, Drexel University hosted the Symposium on 2D Transition Metal Compounds for Energy Applications to bring together researchers from universities, national laboratories, and industry to learn about the growing importance of two-dimensional (2D) materials and build opportunities for regional collaborations focused on this area. Over 85 registered participants from 13 different institutions attended the program, which consisted of invited talks from top researchers and a student poster presentation. The talks included 6 presentations from Drexel faculty in Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Physics, as well as faculty presentations from regional universities including Columbia, Yale, Maryland, Penn, and Johns Hopkins. The poster session was held in the Drexel Main Building concurrent with a reception for Professor Yury Gogotsi, who was installed as the Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Professor on May 1.

Gogotsi said, “The meeting really highlighted the tremendous potential for two-dimensional materials in a variety of energy technologies. Presentations by investigators at Drexel and other institutions clearly demonstrated the rapidly growing momentum around MXene materials for use in batteries, supercapacitors, and catalysis.”

The symposium was sponsored by the recently launched Drexel Areas of Research Excellence (DARE) program, which is supporting the initiative on Biologically-Inspired and Resource-Conserving Advanced Materials (BRAVE). The BRAVE initiative, involving faculty from numerous Drexel colleges and schools, is designed to stake out a national leadership role in the synthesis and processing of new materials. The development of novel 2D materials, such as the MXene family of transition metal carbides and nitrides, for applications in supercapacitors, batteries and catalysis is one of the central efforts within the BRAVE initiative. Professor Michele Marcolongo, the PI of the BRAVE initiative, said, “The symposium was successful in bringing together students, postdoctoral researchers, and faculty, providing an opportunity for research groups to build new collaborations and learn more about the cutting edge materials research at Drexel.”

Prof. Steven May organized the meeting. He described the importance of these materials, “Two-dimensional materials are really exciting because they can have properties that differ dramatically from their three-dimensional counterparts. For example, at the symposium researchers showed how the atomically thin nature of 2D materials makes them great candidates for applications that require lots of surface area, such as catalysis or electrodes for supercapacitors.”

The symposium was attended by Drexel undergraduate and graduate students from five different departments, as well as students from Temple, Penn, and Maryland. The meeting provided students with a chance to learn from and network with top researchers in the field. “Two-dimensional materials research has expanded greatly even in my time as a student at Drexel and I always look for opportunities to see alternative perspectives about the field. This symposium offered just that: a happy medium between a small group meeting and a large conference; it was a chance to explore things you didn't know before, yet also an opportunity to network with presenters,” said Kathleen Maleski, a PhD candidate in Materials Science and Engineering.

“The meeting really highlighted the tremendous potential for two-dimensional materials in a variety of energy technologies. Presentations by investigators at Drexel and other institutions clearly demonstrated the rapidly growing momentum around MXenes for use in batteries, supercapacitors, and catalysis.”