Articles

Unidentified male playing guitar while his brain activity is recorded. Where in the Brain Does Creativity Come from? Evidence from Jazz Musicians

A new brain-imaging study out of Drexel University's Creativity Research Lab sheds light on the controversy on which side of the brain is responsible for creativity by studying the brain of jazz guitarists during improvisation. 

New Research Reveals Insights into How Fruit Flies Find Food What Can Fruit Flies Teach Us About How Creatures Find Food?
Until now, researchers haven't yet understood how individual directional cues and search movements are used together to help fruit flies find food. Thanks to a recently published study of fruit flies in PLOS Computational Biology from researchers at Drexel University's School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, researchers now have a way to parse out how different mechanisms are used individually and in conjunction with each other.
autoimmune ‘But You Don’t Look Sick?’ How Broad Categories like Autoimmune Impact Patient Experience  
When your disease is hard to name and doesn’t have visible symptoms, it can be hard for others to understand that you are sick. And, when people don’t know much about your disease, it can be hard to explain it to family and friends.
water Heavy Spring Rainfall is Followed by Spikes in Gastrointestinal Illness in Philadelphia
Heavy spring rainfall in Philadelphia may lead to twice the rate of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI), such as diarrhea or vomiting, throughout the city, reports a three-year study recently published in PLOS One from researchers at Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health.
Nine out of Ten Transgender Adults Do Not Have Their Self-Identified Name and Gender on All Their Identification Documents  Transgender Adults Holding Gender-Affirming IDs Have Better Mental Health
Having gender-affirming documents, such as a passport, driver’s license, or birth certificate, may improve mental health among transgender adults, according to findings published today in The Lancet Public Health from researchers at Drexel University.
dry MXene Water-Free Way to Make MXenes Could Mean New Uses for the Promising Nanomaterials
Drexel University researchers have discovered a different way to make the atom-thin material that presents a number of new opportunities for using it. The new discovery removes water from the MXene-making process, which means the materials can be used in applications in which water is a contaminant or hampers performance, such as battery electrodes and next-generation solar cells.
bulk MXene Making More MXene — Researchers Unveil a Scalable Production System for the Promising, 2D Nanomaterials

For more than a decade, two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene, have been touted as the key to making better microchips, batteries, antennas and many other devices. But a significant challenge of using these atom-thin building materials for the technology of the future is ensuring that they can be produced in bulk quantities without losing their quality. For one of the most promising new types of 2D nanomaterials, MXenes, that’s no longer a problem. Researchers at Drexel University and the Materials Research Center in Ukraine have designed a system that can be used to make large quantities of the material while preserving its unique properties.

The Drexel delegation hiked to the Bioko program's research site on a beach monitoring marine turtles’ nesting grounds. Photo credit: Scott Cooper. In Equatorial Guinea, Drexel Leaders Deepen Longstanding Research Partnership
A delegation led by President John Fry traveled to the African nation to further the University’s commitment to its Bioko Biodiversity Protection Program.