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Science & Technology

dry MXene

Water-Free Way to Make MXenes Could Mean New Uses for the Promising Nanomaterials

Drexel University researchers have discovered a different way to make the atom-thin material that presents a number of new opportunities for using it. The new discovery removes water from the MXene-making process, which means the materials can be used in applications in which water is a contaminant or hampers performance, such as battery electrodes and next-generation solar cells.
Unidentified male playing guitar while his brain activity is recorded.

Where in the Brain Does Creativity Come from? Evidence from Jazz Musicians

A new brain-imaging study out of Drexel University's Creativity Research Lab sheds light on the controversy on which side of the brain is responsible for creativity by studying the brain of jazz guitarists during improvisation. 

bulk MXene

Making More MXene — Researchers Unveil a Scalable Production System for the Promising, 2D Nanomaterials

For more than a decade, two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene, have been touted as the key to making better microchips, batteries, antennas and many other devices. But a significant challenge of using these atom-thin building materials for the technology of the future is ensuring that they can be produced in bulk quantities without losing their quality. For one of the most promising new types of 2D nanomaterials, MXenes, that’s no longer a problem. Researchers at Drexel University and the Materials Research Center in Ukraine have designed a system that can be used to make large quantities of the material while preserving its unique properties.

The Drexel delegation hiked to the Bioko program's research site on a beach monitoring marine turtles’ nesting grounds. Photo credit: Scott Cooper.

In Equatorial Guinea, Drexel Leaders Deepen Longstanding Research Partnership

A delegation led by President John Fry traveled to the African nation to further the University’s commitment to its Bioko Biodiversity Protection Program.
Left to right: Claudia Albertini, Julia Farnan, Anthony DiNatale and Ottavia Tartagni at the DUniBo presentation Farnan and DiNatale held at Drexel this winter. Photo courtesy Olimpia Meucci.

New Italian Exchange Program Encourages Scientific Collaboration and Understanding

In the last few months, Drexel University College of Medicine and the University of Bologna in Italy have hosted students from each other’s institution to further future opportunities for research partnerships.
gliding arc plasma

Blasting 'Forever' Chemicals Out of the Water with a Blast of Cold Plasma

Researchers from Drexel University have found a way to destroy stubbornly resilient toxic compounds, ominously dubbed “forever chemicals,” that have contaminated the drinking water of millions across the United States.

Bob Quaglia (BS electrical and computer engineering ‘86) is a big believer in fate, and he’s been helping to shape the fate of Drexel co-op students, like he once was, as a manager at Woodward McCoach Inc. since 1994.

Questions With a 20-Year Co-op Manager: Bob Quaglia

Bob Quaglia (BS electrical and computer engineering ‘86) is a big believer in fate, and he’s been helping to shape the fate of Drexel co-op students, like he once was, as a manager at Woodward McCoach Inc. since 1994.
Steve Sclafani, a Drexel doctoral student in physics, headed to the IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory as a member of the Drexel IceCube Research group, and subsequently the larger IceCube Collaboration. The collaboration includes more than 300 people from 52 institutions (including Drexel) across 12 countries who helped to build, test and continue to maintain the detector.

A Drexel PhD Student’s 'Summer' at the South Pole

Steve Sclafani, a Drexel doctoral student in physics, spent over a month at the South Pole supporting research in the IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory, and following in the footsteps of his mentor.
Drexel University-based startup VyB Technologies LLC, was selected to present at CES’s Eureka Park alongside 1200-plus innovative startups from 43 countries around the world.

How to Present at an Industry Conference

Adit Gupta, who graduated from Drexel in 2019 and is currently a computer science PhD student in the College of Computing & Informatics, provides a play-by-play on how his team from VyB Technologies LLC prepared to present at the Consumer Technology Association’s annual conference earlier this month, and what they took away from the experience.

Bill Waldron Jr. helps current Drexel students approach career opportunities and the workplace with the same open-mindedness and fervor that he has approached his own career with.

Questions With a 20-Year Co-op Manager: Bill Waldron Jr.

Bill Waldron has been managing Drexel engineering co-op students for 25 of the 30 years he’s been with AT&T Mobility. He told DrexelNow about the keys to success for a stable career like his, for a rewarding co-op and for ways Drexel students can make an impact on the job.
smog

Suffocating Ozone — Policies That Stem Emission of Precursor Chemicals Save Lives and Crops

An international team of environmental and atmospheric scientists have pinpointed the chemical emissions that contribute the most to the harmful air quality conditions that are choking more and more cities and causing health problems and reducing agricultural production across the United States. The findings suggest that targeted policies could be more effective in limiting the formation of ground-level ozone, like smog, which contributes to tens of thousands of respiratory related deaths and nearly a billion dollars of crop loss each year.
atomic bonds

Taking an X-Ray of an Atomic Bond

A group of researchers led by Drexel University has demonstrated a method that allows scientists to experimentally measure how the chemical bonds of materials are altered when two different materials are linked together. This method provides an atomic layer-by-layer look at the materials’ electron configuration, which is the source of traits like conductivity and magnetism.

microbes

Teams of Microbes Are at Work in Our Bodies. Drexel Researchers Have Figured Out What They’re up to.

An algorithm akin to the annoyingly helpful one that attempts to auto-complete text messages and emails is now being harnessed for a better cause. A group of Drexel University researchers are using its pattern-recognition ability to identify microbial communities in the body by sifting through volumes of genetic code. Their method could speed the development of medical treatments for microbiota-linked ailments like Crohn’s disease.