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Science & Technology

College of Engineering Dean Sharon Walker, PhD.

Q&A: Sharon Walker, Dean of the College of Engineering

Earlier this term, Drexel University welcomed College of Engineering Dean Sharon Walker, PhD, who opens a new chapter in leadership, advocacy, and education for faculty, staff and students.
Lithium-Sulfur cathode

A Stabilizing Influence Enables Lithium-Sulfur Battery Evolution

A new approach for making cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries, reported by researchers in the College of Engineering, could help to prevent a performance-sapping phenomenon that has been preventing their progress toward commercial use. Their method for infusing sulfur into the cathode cuts a time-consuming process down to just five seconds and does it without using toxic chemicals which are often a necessary part of production.

Meghan Barrett

PhD Candidate Finds Place for Entomological Research, Teaching Goals to Grow at Drexel

Meghan Barrett, a PhD candidate in Drexel University’s Department of Biology within the College of Arts and Sciences, is sharing her passion for… bugs … with undergraduates and the world. 

MXene spray antenna

Drexel's Spray-On Antennas Could Be the Tech Connector of the Future

A group of researchers from the College of Engineering recently reported a method for spraying invisibly thin antennas, made from a type of two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene, that perform as well as those being used in mobile devices, wireless routers and portable transducers. 


ferroelectric domain wall material

Once a Performance Barrier, This Material Quirk Could Strengthen Our Telecommunication Connections

Researchers who study and manipulate the behavior of materials at the atomic level have discovered a way to make a thin material that enhances the flow of microwave energy. The advance, which could improve telecommunications, sheds new light on structural traits, generally viewed as static and a hindrance, that, when made to be dynamic, are actually key to the material’s special ability.
Fraser Fleming, PhD, head of the chemistry department in the College of Arts and Sciences, teaching the course.

A Creative Approach to Teaching Creativity, Interdisciplinary Teamwork for Graduate Students

Two Drexel University faculty members from different disciplines have come together to provide a unique opportunity for graduate students: learn how to flex their creative muscles.

crystalsome

Drexel's Polymer Pill Proves it Can Deliver

Selecting the right packaging to get precious cargo from point A to point B can be a daunting task at the post office. For some time, scientists have wrestled with a similar set of questions when packaging medicine for delivery in the bloodstream: How much packing will keep it safe? Is it the right packing material? Is it too big? Is it too heavy? Researchers from Drexel University have developed a new type of container that seems to be the perfect fit for making the delivery.
screenshot of a heart diagram

Drexel Introduces Repository of Virtual Reality Content to Enhance Online Education

New digital enhancements will take online education to new and far more expansive heights at Drexel University. VRtifacts+, a first of its kind repository, will empower faculty and instructional designers to seamlessly incorporate 250,000 augmented, virtual and mixed reality learning objects across a wealth of disciplines into the University’s online coursework.

Fossil Fuels

Report: Fossil Fuel Industries - The Goliath of Climate-Related Lobbying Efforts, Spent Billions

A new study by Drexel environmental sociologist Robert J. Brulle, PhDshows that between 2000 and 2016, lobbyists spent more than two billion dollars on influencing relevant legislation in the US Congress. As the first peer-reviewed, comprehensive analysis ever conducted of climate lobbying data, Brulle’s research confirms the spending of environmental groups and the renewable energy sector was eclipsed by the spending of the electrical utilities, fossil fuel, and transportation sectors.

Drexel STEM Students Will Earn Teacher Certification Through New $1.2 Million Grant

More Drexel University undergraduate students will have the opportunity to earn teacher certification in science and mathematics thanks to the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Scholarship program, which recently awarded Drexel’s School of Education a 5-year, $1.2 million grant. The new grant will allow 24 Drexel students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in a major related to science, technology, engineering or mathematics to earn pre-service teacher certification in middle grades (4-8) science or mathematics through Drexel’s DragonsTeach Middle Years program.

An X-ray view of the heads of a worker and a soldier ant and the brains inside their head. The worker is much smaller with the brain filling more of its head.

You Have One Job: Compared to Multi-Tasking Workers, Soldier Ant Brains Small

A Drexel University study found that ant colonies evolved to spend less energy on developing the brains of soldier ants, who have relatively simple jobs, compared to multi-tasking workers.
An artist's rendering of a blazer shooting neutrinos down to sensors at the IceCube facility in Antarctica

Drexel Astrophysicist Proves the Origin of Neutrinos

With nine-and-a-half years of data and a South Pole observatory, a Drexel professor and her colleagues has shown the origin of at least some of the high-energy particles known as "neutrinos."
Mihir Shah '00 founded UE Lifesciences to develop the iBreastExam using research and support from Drexel professors and the Coulter-Drexel Translational Research Partnership Program.

Coulter-Drexel Translational Research Program Continues on Path to Succeed Through 2021

The University’s Coulter-Drexel Translational Research Partnership Program recently met the metrics to continue its innovative programming for another three years.