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The Legacy Center Blog

Class of 1898, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania.(The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

Could Catharine Macfarlane’s work have lengthened Ada Lovelace’s life?

Catherine MacFarlane graduated from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1898, and worked as a practitioner and lecturer on obstetrics and gynecology. MacFarlane is best known for founding the Cancer Control Research Project in 1938, where women could be screened for uterine cancer. The findings of the Cancer Control Research Project determined that through the use of regular cancer screenings on healthy women, various forms of cancer could be detected early on and prevented. This blog post, made in honor of Ada Lovelace Day, recognizes Catherine MacFarlane’s accomplishments and poses the question that if Ada Lovelace lived in MacFarlane’s time, could her deadly cancer have been prevented?

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A memento of the Dean's reception, held Oct 10, 1885. Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Constant Diversity?

The Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania stood out in the number of foreign students who attended the college. Students such as Dr. Kei Okami, Dr. Sabat Islambooly, and Dr. Anandibai Joshee, all from the class of 1886, were often photographed in their native attire and written about in local newspapers. This blog post highlights the complex legacy of this diversity, focusing specifically on the experiences of several Japanese students who enrolled in Woman’s Medical College during the Second World War. Students such as Dr. Toshiko Toyota and Dr. Ruby Inouye enrolled while their families were in Japanese Internment Camps and faced many setbacks from administration. Overall, the blog post highlights the many sides of Woman’s Medical College diversity.

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Rufus Weaver and the nerve dissection titled "Harriet."(The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Harriet

Harriet is a complete dissection of the cerebrospinal nervous system, dissected and mounted in 1888 by anatomist Dr. Rufus Weaver of Hahnemann Medical College. This blog post highlights Harriet’s history, from her use as a teaching aid by Dr. Weaver in 1888 to her current use as a display at the Drexel University College of Medicine’s Queen Lane campus.

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Archives staff in the stacks. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

And...We're In!

On December 4, 2009, the Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center Archives moved from Drexel University’s Hagerty Library to a new space at the Drexel University College of Medicine Queen Lane Campus. This blog post is a quick update from the archives staff after being in the space for a month, and highlights the unexpected challenges and excitements from being in a new space.

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Empty stacks shelving aisles. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

Imminent Move

On December 4, 2009, the Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center Archives moved from Drexel University’s Hagerty Library to a new space at the Drexel University College of Medicine Queen Lane Campus. This blog post is an announcement of the official moving date, and expresses excitement for a new space.

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American Women's Hospital Service workers in front of ambulance. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Women Physicians at War

The American Women’s Hospitals (AWH) was established in 1917 as an volunteer organization for women physicians to help refugees and civilians caught in the midst of the First World War. Originally named the War Service Committee, AWH was founded by Dr. Rosalie Slaughter Morton as an extension of the newly established Medical Women’s National Association. AWH opened volunteer run hospitals across Europe and the Middle East. After the Sparkman Act of 1943 allowed women physicians to serve in the U.S. Army and Navy, many women physicians such as Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania Dean Dr. Margaret Craighill joined the military during World War II as physicians. This blog post details the history of woman physicians Volunteering in World War I and II, focusing specifically on Dr. Craighill and the AWH.

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Construction of new building on Drexel Queen Lane campus, 2009 - interior storage space. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

Latest Construction Photos: Nearly There!

On December 4, 2009, the Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center Archives moved from Drexel University’s Hagerty Library to a new space at the Drexel University College of Medicine Queen Lane Campus. This blog post is a September 2009 update of the construction on the new Legacy Center building at the Queen Lane Campus.

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Clipping title Why Not Marry a Suffragette, by J. Ilted. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Women’s Suffrage

Passed on August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment created universal suffrage in the United States and after years of fighting, allowed women to vote. This blog post, written to honor the 89th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, looks at opinions on the suffrage at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. It highlights unexpected critics of the 19th Amendment through student editorials, and highlights suffragist faculty members of the college such as Dr. Ellen Potter and Dr. Anna Howard Shaw.

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Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections logo

Louisville Floods & Racing History

In early August 2009 a huge storm hit the American midwest and caused major flash flooding in the Louisville, Kentucky area. One building damaged in the flood was The Kentucky Derby Museum at Churchill Downs, which sustained heavy flooding to its basement, where the museum’s archival collections were stored. This blog post focuses on the converging interests of its author, Legacy Center archivist Lisa Grimm: horse racing and archives. The post describes the immense danger of water damage in archival collections, and explains why the majority of archives are located in basements. It also briefly covers the widespread and sometimes unorganized nature of archival material on horse racing, and suggests better ways to preserve horse racing archival material.

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