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The Legacy Center Blog

Construction of new building on Drexel Queen Lane campus, 2009 - basement excavation. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

The Big Dig

On December 4, 2009, the Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center Archives moved from Drexel University’s Hagerty Library to a new space at the Drexel University College of Medicine Queen Lane Campus. This blog post is a quick update about the construction of the new archives space, specifically the construction of the buildings concrete foundation.

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Women medical students working in the lab. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

Every Day is Ladies' Day with Me

Women’s History Month is celebrated in the United States during the month of March, and largely corresponds with International Women’s Day on March 8. This blog post is a short early March reflection on Women’s History Day and the renewed interest in women’s history, and makes the point that at the Legacy Center archives, every month is Women’s History Month because so much of the archival material is centered around the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania and the theme of women in medicine.

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Portrait of Anna M. Longshore Potts, MD. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Potts, Kettle, Quack?

Dr. Anna Longshore-Potts was a 19th century physician and a member of the first graduating class of Female Medical College of Pennsylvania (later Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania) in 1852. Dr. Longshore-Potts was a very prolific preventative health lecturer and public speaker who spoke all over the world. This blog post looks at Dr. Longshore-Potts' legacy and specifically about the challenges she encountered as an early woman in the medical field. While she was wildly popular she also faced huge backlash from many prominent male physicians, both in America and abroad, who strongly disregarded her as intellectually inferior because she was a woman.

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Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections logo

You Can't Always Get What You Want

On December 4, 2009, the Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center Archives moved from Drexel University’s Hagerty Library to a new space at the Drexel University College of Medicine Queen Lane Campus. This blog post is an update on a layout change that involved putting an electrical room within the space designated for the archive stacks. The post updates readers, goes over some of the challenges with the proposed update, and ends on a positive note looking forward to the new space.

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Correspondenzblatt der Homoeopathischen Aerzte, October 22, 1835. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Correspondenzblatt der Homoeopathischen Aerzte

The Correspondenzblatt der Homoeopathischen Aerzte was a shortlived publication put out in 1835 and 1836 by the North American Academy of the Homeopathic Healing Art (better known as the Allentown Academy). The Correspondenzblatt was the first homeopathic medical journal published in the United States, and was edited by one of the founding homeopathic physicians in America, Dr. Constantine Herring. This blog post discusses what the journal is, where it came from, and what it wrote about.

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Rebecca Cole's thesis, the Eye and Its Appendages. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the collections: Dr. Rebecca Cole

Dr. Rebecca Cole was a 1867 graduate of Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, and the second African American woman in the United States to recieve a medical degree. This blog post draws together disparate details on Dr. Cole and attempts to create a narrative of her 50 years of medical work that she undertook after her 1867 graduation and before her death in 1922.

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Amy Kaukonen, MD, in Fairport, Ohio. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Dr. Amy Kaukonen

Dr. Amy Kaukonen was a 1915 graduate of Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania who went on to become the mayor of Fairpoint Harbor, Ohio, and consequently one of the first woman mayors in the United States. This blog post is an a brief dive in Dr. Kaukonen's life, prompted by a research requeston her material from the Legacy Center Archives. It discusses her time as a student at Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, and, with the aid of the New York Times archive and the researcher, her exciting time as mayor of Fairpoint Harbor. Overall, this blog post seeks to highlight an unusual and interesting story of a graduate of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania.

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Portrait of Eliza Grier, MD. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Dr. Eliza Grier

Dr. Eliza Grier was an African American physician who graduated from Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1898. Being born a slave, Dr. Grier came from a very low socioeconomic status and faced huge difficulty in gaining an education and financially putting herself through medical school. This blog post is a brief biography and overview of Dr. Grier's life through the materials available on her at the Legacy Center Archives. It takes readers from her scantly detailed early life to her undergraduate career at Fink University to her brief time practicing medicine in Atlanta, Georgia until her untimely death in 1902. Overall, the post celebrated Dr. Grier's achievements and hopes to preserve her story.

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Portrait of Constantine Hering holding a book. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

Plots and Plans

On December 4, 2009, the Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center Archives moved from Drexel University’s Hagerty Library to a new space at the Drexel University College of Medicine Queen Lane Campus. This blog post is a small update on the slow process of working out moving plans, as well as an update on a few digitization projects.

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