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Equity and Diversity

Correspondence between Pauline Dinkins and Martha Tracy, 1919. (Legacy Center Archives & Special Collections)

The True Path to Diversity

Feb 25, 2021

The murder of George Floyd turned the United States and the world into a state of chaos. He wasn’t the first person to lose his life to police brutality and unfortunately, probably won’t be the last. His death sparked many conversations about the racist violence and just plain racism that Black People endure while living in the nation. In the world of archives, conversations began about how to document the lives of Black People during this time and how to bring the hidden stories already acquired to the main dialogue of the archives' story. 

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Dr. Tallant, professor of obstetrics at WMCP outside the college’s maternity clinic c. 1923 (From the Clara Dickinson scrapbook Acc1993.01)

"Guardian of the Health of Negro Women": The Work and Legacy of Dr. Virginia Alexander

Jun 11, 2020

Dr. Virginia Alexander graduated from the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1925. In the 1930s, she established a clinic from her home in Philadelphia to provide health services to the African-American community, mainly pregnant women. The blog describes how her work has impacted the African-American community and how her legacy lives on in Asasiya Muhammad, who runs Inner Circle Midwifery, and others who share her vision and values. (The Legacy Center Blog)

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Women Physicians Deny They Are 'Disappointed' - Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania clippings scrapbook: Volume 5, page 490-491

"There is No Such Thing as Bad Publicity" - Controversies at the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania

Dec 05, 2019

The first 8 volumes (1867-1920) of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania clipping scrapbooks were digitized as part of a Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) for the In Her Own Right: A Century of Women's Activism, 1820-1920 project. These scrapbooks uniquely capture the conflicting opinions on women in the medical profession. This blog post explores two events that are documented in the clippings involving WMCP students, specifically the Jeering Episode and Dr. Richard Clarke Cabot's commencement speech.

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Florence Haseltine at a young age. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

"I answer to myself": Dr. Florence Haseltine and her path to women's health advocacy

Nov 14, 2019

The Florence Haseltine papers are available at the Drexel University College of Medicine Legacy Center and are filled with the life of Dr. Florence Haseltine through documents and other mediums. This blog features a short account of Dr. Haseltine's life and her many contributions to the medical profession.

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The complete nervous system dissection known as “Harriet” (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

Dissecting Harriet Cole: Uncovering Women's History in the Archives

Nov 20, 2018

Harriet is a complete dissection of the cerebrospinal nervous system, dissected and mounted in 1888 by anatomist Dr. Rufus Weaver of Hahnemann Medical College. In the blog post the author attempts to use the Legacy Center collections and outside sources to uncover and document any concrete information about the living Harriet.

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Doris Bartuska, MD circa 1987 (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

The Story of Dr. Doris Bartuska: Sexism in Medicine during the 1950s to 1980s

Aug 08, 2017

The Doris Bartuska papers contain the work of Dr. Doris Bartuska, a 1954 graduate of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, in the field of medicine and beyond. This blog post explores Dr. Bartuska's time as a physician from the 1950s to the 1980s, her experience with sexism, and the barriers she broke in a male dominated sphere.

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Dr. Esther Pohl Lovejoy, 1918 (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

Working with the Sources: The American Women’s Hospitals in the Near East

Oct 03, 2014

Full article following initial blog post written by Virginia Metaxas, Ph.D., Professor of History and Women’s Studies, Southern Connecticut State University and Legacy Center 2010 M. Louise Carpenter Gloeckner Fellow, about the American Women's Hospitals efforts in helping war torn Greece rebuild their country. 

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A memento of the Dean's reception, held Oct 10, 1885. Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Constant Diversity?

Feb 26, 2010

The Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania stood out in the number of foreign students who attended the college. Students such as Dr. Kei Okami, Dr. Sabat Islambooly, and Dr. Anandibai Joshee, all from the class of 1886, were often photographed in their native attire and written about in local newspapers. This blog post highlights the complex legacy of this diversity, focusing specifically on the experiences of several Japanese students who enrolled in Woman’s Medical College during the Second World War. Students such as Dr. Toshiko Toyota and Dr. Ruby Inouye enrolled while their families were in Japanese Internment Camps and faced many setbacks from administration. Overall, the blog post highlights the many sides of Woman’s Medical College diversity.

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Rufus Weaver and the nerve dissection titled "Harriet."(The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Harriet

Feb 17, 2010

Harriet is a complete dissection of the cerebrospinal nervous system, dissected and mounted in 1888 by anatomist Dr. Rufus Weaver of Hahnemann Medical College. This blog post highlights Harriet’s history, from her use as a teaching aid by Dr. Weaver in 1888 to her current use as a display at the Drexel University College of Medicine’s Queen Lane campus.

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Clipping title Why Not Marry a Suffragette, by J. Ilted. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Women’s Suffrage

Aug 26, 2009

Passed on August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment created universal suffrage in the United States and after years of fighting, allowed women to vote. This blog post, written to honor the 89th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, looks at opinions on the suffrage at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. It highlights unexpected critics of the 19th Amendment through student editorials, and highlights suffragist faculty members of the college such as Dr. Ellen Potter and Dr. Anna Howard Shaw.

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Rebecca Cole's thesis, the Eye and Its Appendages. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the collections: Dr. Rebecca Cole

Feb 06, 2009

Dr. Rebecca Cole was a 1867 graduate of Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, and the second African American woman in the United States to recieve a medical degree. This blog post draws together disparate details on Dr. Cole and attempts to create a narrative of her 50 years of medical work that she undertook after her 1867 graduation and before her death in 1922.

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Portrait of Eliza Grier, MD. (The Legacy Center Archives and Special Collections)

From the Collections: Dr. Eliza Grier

Jan 21, 2009

Dr. Eliza Grier was an African American physician who graduated from Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1898. Being born a slave, Dr. Grier came from a very low socioeconomic status and faced huge difficulty in gaining an education and financially putting herself through medical school. This blog post is a brief biography and overview of Dr. Grier's life through the materials available on her at the Legacy Center Archives. It takes readers from her scantly detailed early life to her undergraduate career at Fink University to her brief time practicing medicine in Atlanta, Georgia until her untimely death in 1902. Overall, the post celebrated Dr. Grier's achievements and hopes to preserve her story.

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