For a better experience, click the Compatibility Mode icon above to turn off Compatibility Mode, which is only for viewing older websites.

Recognized Leaders In Health Administration

Make your mark with a degree that will grow in demand as the healthcare field grows and expands. At Drexel, health care knowledge meets real-world health challenges in the classroom and beyond.

Health Administration Department

The Health Administration Department offers programs for you to seek employment in administrative or managerial positions in the ever-expanding health care sector. Graduates from our programs go on to work in hospitals, clinics, managed-care companies, health-insurance companies, law and health-marketing firms.

Our dedicated and highly-qualified faculty have extensive training and professional experience in their specialty areas.

Our students can choose to complete their Health Administration education with in-class and online courses. This flexibility makes it possible for working professionals to complete a Bachelor of Science degree completely with online courses .

Students may be interested in an accelerated, dual-degree BS/MPH program with the Dornsife School of Public Health of Drexel University. Qualified students will be able to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Services Administration and a Master of Public Health degree in only five years. The HSAD program is an Associate Member of the Association of Undergraduate Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA).

Programs

Undergraduate

Graduate

Certificates

Health Administration Faculty

View Profiles

News & Events

 

01/15/21

We will honor, on January 18, 2021, the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This holiday has been a national day of service—a “day on, not a day off”—to improve our communities for the past 26 years.

We still feel the weight of how much more there is to be done even 52 years after Dr. King's death. Every day for CNHP is a “day on” because we are passionate about social justice and the minimizations of health disparities and health inequities. CNHP is committed to our students, alumni, faculty and professional staff and have long honored this day through service.

Image with a photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and a quote: Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. Dr. King wrote about race relations in a way that was mutually beneficial, writing from the “Letter from Birmingham Jail;” In a real sense all life is inter-related. All men are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the inter-related structure of reality.

His words are especially relevant today: “I have tried to make clear that it is wrong to use immoral means to attain moral ends. But now I must affirm that it is just as wrong, or even more so, to use moral means to preserve immoral ends. In summary there is never the wrong time to do the right thing and to grow from our mistakes."

These tools, Six Steps for Nonviolent Social Change, shared by the King Center resonate with me deeply as a social change agent.

  1. Information gathering.
  2. Education.
  3. Personal commitment.
  4. Negotiation.
  5. Direct action.
  6. Reconciliation.

These tenets are to be reflected in our mission within diversity, equity and inclusion, the course learning objectives and our actions as students, alumni, faculty, professional staff and partners. I must add for a point of reflection: Own your own stuff so that change can occur; I know I do!

Appreciate you as social change agents,

Veronica Carey, PhD
Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

01/14/21

December 9, 2020

When the announcement about a new home for the College of Nursing and Health Professions was made in May 2019, no one could have imagined that construction would be delayed by a global pandemic. It was expected that groundbreaking would be in spring 2020 with a substantial completion delivery of mid-2022. Beginning in late July, it is still the hope to maintain the same timeline.

Google Earth screenshot of the location of the Drexel Academic Tower

With CNHP being the first occupants of the new facility, some of the College of Medicine’s administrative functions, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies and its first- and second-year medical program will join the College in phases. President Fry, in a message to the University in late 2019, said “at the new academic building, many of Drexel’s health-related programs will be under one roof, enhancing opportunities for interdisciplinary education in a facility that affords health sciences students, faculty and professional staff the best possible environment for continued development and growth.”

05/08/20

We asked our faculty, students, staff and alumni what they are doing to help during the COVID-19 pandemic and how they recharge after long or challenging days.

These are some of their stories.

 

Sharrona Pearl, PhD is associate teaching professor of Medical Ethics in the Department of Health AdministrationMy family is committed to grocery shopping for vulnerable people and folks who have small children and can't leave the house. I have also been volunteering with Philly Mutual Aid to participate in communal support efforts in my community.

To Recharge, I read and jump on the trampoline with my kids.

Sharrona Pearl, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Administration

 

Selfie of Kate G, a female with long blond hairI work in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) as a bedside RN taking care of micro premature infants. We have had a few premature infants born to COVID+ mothers that are critically ill in the ICU.

Thankfully, so far, we have had no babies who are COVID +. We are taking care of these babies during a dark time for many families—it's truly an honor.

To recharge, I do Yoga and walking the trails by my house—you have to start fresh each day!

Katherine Geise, BSN '13, MSN '21

 

Eileen Sarnes, a female nurse wearing PPEI am currently in the MSN-FNP track and a step-down float nurse right in the epicenter at New York Presbyterian-Columbia. In the beginning of March, I floated to COVID-19 units and quickly became infected on March 19. I am blessed to have made a quick and full recovery!

Although I was scared and nervous , on April 3, I eagerly returned to the frontlines in saving lives! It has been an emotionally hard task to take care of COVID patients. However, whenever I discharge a COVID patient it makes it all worth it. My hospital plays “I Gotta Feeling” by the Black Eyed Peas every time a patient is extubated or discharged—it's been playing more and more lately!

Nursing has and always will be my calling. Thank you, Drexel, for helping me pursue my dreams of becoming a nurse practitioner. Shout out to all the RN’s working on the frontlines and still focusing on their education! CLASS OF 2020, WE GOT THIS!

To recharge after a long day at work, I like to enjoy a nice glass of white wine, meditate or talk to family and friends.

Eileen Sarnes, MSN '20

 

More News & Events