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Recognized Leaders In Health Administration

Make your mark with a degree that will grow in demand as the healthcare field grows and expands. At Drexel, health care knowledge meets real-world health challenges in the classroom and beyond.

Health Administration Department

The Health Administration Department offers programs for you to seek employment in administrative or managerial positions in the ever-expanding health care sector. Graduates from our programs go on to work in hospitals, clinics, managed-care companies, health-insurance companies, law and health-marketing firms.

Our dedicated and highly-qualified faculty have extensive training and professional experience in their specialty areas.

Our students can choose to complete their Health Administration education with in-class and online courses. This flexibility makes it possible for working professionals to complete a Bachelor of Science degree completely with online courses .

Students may be interested in an accelerated, dual-degree BS/MPH program with the Dornsife School of Public Health of Drexel University. Qualified students will be able to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Services Administration and a Master of Public Health degree in only five years. The HSAD program is an Associate Member of the Association of Undergraduate Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA).

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News & Events

 

01/14/21

December 9, 2020

When the announcement about a new home for the College of Nursing and Health Professions was made in May 2019, no one could have imagined that construction would be delayed by a global pandemic. It was expected that groundbreaking would be in spring 2020 with a substantial completion delivery of mid-2022. Beginning in late July, it is still the hope to maintain the same timeline.

Google Earth screenshot of the location of the Drexel Academic Tower

With CNHP being the first occupants of the new facility, some of the College of Medicine’s administrative functions, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies and its first- and second-year medical program will join the College in phases. President Fry, in a message to the University in late 2019, said “at the new academic building, many of Drexel’s health-related programs will be under one roof, enhancing opportunities for interdisciplinary education in a facility that affords health sciences students, faculty and professional staff the best possible environment for continued development and growth.”

03/15/21

The highly respected and for-credit Macy Undergraduate Leadership Fellows Program is designed for Drexel University undergraduate students in the College of Nursing and Health Professions and the Dornsife School of Public Health. The program, created by Roberta Waite, EdD, professor, associate dean for Community-Centered Health & Wellness and Academic Integration and executive director of the Stephen & Sandra Sheller 11th St. Family Health Services, consists of three in-person courses completed consecutively in the fall, winter and spring quarters and taken in conjunction with regular program courses.

Graphic of the four pillars of the Macy Undergraduate Leadership Fellows program The unique format—group activities, workshops, round table debates and panel discussions—enable fellows to become more self-aware by analyzing strengths, weaknesses, privilege and biases in a very supportive and safe space. Fellows are encouraged to explore their values, purpose and beliefs, and in some cases, redefine their understanding of leadership. Mentors, a crucial part of the program, assist students in doing the challenging work necessary to develop professional networks, build their toolkits of enhanced interpersonal and leadership skills and reach their individual. Together fellows, faculty and mentors examine complex, and sometimes uncomfortable, issues from multiple perspectives while working interprofessionally with students from different majors.

In 1966, at the Second Annual Convention of the Medical Committee for Human Rights held in Chicago, The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhuman.” Macy helps students align their developing leadership styles with their own values and ethics. This will guide fellows in addressing the societal issues and concerns they will encounter in their careers through the lens of social justice. The Macy Undergraduate Leadership Fellows Program faculty prepares students—the future health care and service workforce—to contribute creative, innovative solutions to promote health justice. This year's teaching faculty included Ebony White, PhD, assistant clinical professor in Counseling and Family Therapy, Alecia Fox, PhD, assistant clinical professor in Graduate Nursing, and Kimberly McClellan, EdD, assistant clinical professor in Undergraduate Nursing.

The 2020 – 2021 cohort consists of second- and third-years students in nutrition, nursing, health sciences, public health, behavioral health counseling and health services administration. They share, like every cohort, their reasons for applying to Philadelphia's only undergraduate leadership fellows program and what has been most impactful from their experiences. Applications are now being accepted for 2021-2022.

Read their Stories

Image of the 2020-2021 Macy Undergraduate Leadership Fellows Program cohort on a zoom call.

01/15/21

We will honor, on January 18, 2021, the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This holiday has been a national day of service—a “day on, not a day off”—to improve our communities for the past 26 years.

We still feel the weight of how much more there is to be done even 52 years after Dr. King's death. Every day for CNHP is a “day on” because we are passionate about social justice and the minimizations of health disparities and health inequities. CNHP is committed to our students, alumni, faculty and professional staff and have long honored this day through service.

Image with a photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and a quote: Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. Dr. King wrote about race relations in a way that was mutually beneficial, writing from the “Letter from Birmingham Jail;” In a real sense all life is inter-related. All men are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the inter-related structure of reality.

His words are especially relevant today: “I have tried to make clear that it is wrong to use immoral means to attain moral ends. But now I must affirm that it is just as wrong, or even more so, to use moral means to preserve immoral ends. In summary there is never the wrong time to do the right thing and to grow from our mistakes."

These tools, Six Steps for Nonviolent Social Change, shared by the King Center resonate with me deeply as a social change agent.

  1. Information gathering.
  2. Education.
  3. Personal commitment.
  4. Negotiation.
  5. Direct action.
  6. Reconciliation.

These tenets are to be reflected in our mission within diversity, equity and inclusion, the course learning objectives and our actions as students, alumni, faculty, professional staff and partners. I must add for a point of reflection: Own your own stuff so that change can occur; I know I do!

Appreciate you as social change agents,

Veronica Carey, PhD
Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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