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Creative Arts Therapies Department

Innovative Courses Taught By Field Leaders

Internationally recognized faculty train culturally aware and culturally sensitive therapists dedicated to serving a diverse client base.

Creative Arts Therapies Department

Innovative Courses Taught By Field Leaders

Internationally recognized faculty train culturally aware and culturally sensitive therapists dedicated to serving a diverse client base.

Creative Arts Therapies Department

Innovative Courses Taught By Field Leaders

Internationally recognized faculty train culturally aware and culturally sensitive therapists dedicated to serving a diverse client base.

Creative Arts Therapies Department

The Department of Creative Arts Therapies provides students with the most comprehensive and the highest-quality education in their respective creative arts therapy discipline.

Through an integrated blend of classroom, experiential and practical learning in the field, students learn side-by-side with future colleagues in the other creative arts therapy specialties.

Program courses are taught by faculty that are national leaders in their respective fields. Students take advantage of Philadelphia’s lively arts community, which nourishes the artist, dancer and musician within and enables you to continue practicing your art form while pursuing graduate study.

The Department and Diversity

As a community of learners, Drexel’s Department of Creative Arts Therapies is committed to cultivating a diverse and dynamic student population. We are interested in, and enriched by, diversity, including but not limited to: culture, race, ethnicity, gender identification and expression, socio-economic class, religion, nationality, sexual orientation, age, learning styles, and political perspectives. We value these identities, shaped by experience, which support empathetic understanding and enlivened critical thinking in and outside of the classroom and in field placements.

Here in this community, we are aware of our past and present shortcomings and deficiencies. We understand that our programs, like the society in which we live, have too long habitually failed to provide just and plentiful opportunities and resources to all people, a perpetual misstep that has resulted in recurrent exclusion for some and disproportionate inclusion for others. We strive for an expansion of diversity. We recognize, embrace and proclaim that it is only by welcoming all people that we may reach our full, and true, potential as an educational community.

Programs

The Department of Creative Arts Therapies offers three Master of Arts degrees: Art Therapy and Counseling, Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling, and Music Therapy and Counseling. The 90 quarter-credit curricula can be completed in two years on a full-time basis. We encourage full-time enrollment, yet part-time study can be arranged.

We also offer a PhD in Creative Arts Therapies, an innovative and unique research degree for art therapists, dance/movement therapists, and music therapists who are interested in focusing their careers on scholarly pursuits and academic leadership in their specific discipline.

Master of Arts in Art Therapy and Counseling
Engage in art therapy at a prestigious health center aligned to a school of fine arts.

Master of Arts in Dance/Movement Therapy Counseling
Integrate dance and movement into a whole-body approach to mental health.

Master of Arts in Music Therapy and Counseling
Study in the only music therapy program housed within an academic health center.

PhD in Creative Arts Therapies
Earn your PhD in a culture of creativity, innovation, initiative, and support.

Creative Arts Therapies Faculty

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News & Events

 

11/30/17

Sarah Wenger, PT, DPT works with a patient in the gymAccording to the Institute of Medicine, chronic pain is a major health issue affecting approximately 100 million Americans and amounting to a cost of roughly $635 million a year. The healthcare community has a history of poor outcomes for chronic pain that have frustrated both patients and providers. Chronic pain can be very challenging to treat. It is an evolving condition with remodeling of neurological structures and biological, behavioral, environmental and societal influences. The focus is shifting from eliminating pain completely to minimizing the impact of pain on quality of life and building resilience to better cope with chronicity. The opioid crisis has drawn attention to how chronic pain is understood and managed. In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that nonpharmacological therapies be the first line treatment of chronic pain. Mental health, physical therapy and a variety of other professions and wellness strategies are fast becoming that first line defense. Interdisciplinary approaches are considered best practice in treating both chronic pain and substance use disorders. Interdisciplinary care that addresses health and wellness across physical, mental, and social domains is most effective. Healthcare providers need to have a good understanding of chronic pain neuroscience, biopsychosocial components of pain management, issues related to substance use disorders and pain management strategies so that they can effectively integrate their expertise within the context of interdisciplinary care and reinforce strategies used by other team members.

Sarah Wenger, PT, DPT works with patient using a exercise ballAt Drexel University’s Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services, we developed a psychoeducational group called Power Over Pain (PoP). Research has indicated that an interdisciplinary approach aids in improving the functional status and quality of life of patients with chronic pain. PoP is an interdisciplinary program that empowers patients through education to self-manage their pain. The group is based on a framework we developed, the Clinical Reasoning Model for Chronic Pain.

 

Power over Pain Plan of Care

The top of the diagram represents the goal of treatment: patients who are using healthcare services appropriately as they self-manage their pain with little or no opioid use. To reach this goal, patients need education, mentorship for behavioral change, help to address cognitive-affective factors and an understanding of the roles various healthcare providers serve in their health and wellness.

Sarah Wenger, PT, DPT in the gymThe middle of the diagram depicts an interdisciplinary team that includes the patient. All members of the interdisciplinary team collaborate to arrive at unified goals and a unified plan of care. This differs from a multidisciplinary approach where patients see different professionals who are not functioning as a cohesive team, each providing different goals and treatment plans leaving the patient to sort through an often overwhelming amount of information and action items. Good communication among professionals, the patient, the patient’s family and other stakeholders is essential in forming the collaboration needed for efficient and effective care management.

Each pillar at the bottom of the model represents a different area of research important for chronic pain management. While each team member specializes in their discipline, everyone should have a broad knowledge of all areas so that they can effectively situate their expertise within the fabric of the whole patient and a holistic treatment approach that will prepare patients for a resilient path forward.

The PoP group will be re-starting at Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services and will be offered for the first time at Parkway Health and Wellness in this spring. Information about the group and its curriculum can be found at http://poweroverpain.sarah.pt/.

*Note: Wenger's article, “Reducing Opioid Use for Patients with Chronic Pain: An Evidence Based Perspective,” is getting published in the Physical Therapy Journal in print in April and on-line early 2018. 

By Sarah Wenger, PT, DPT, OCS

Associate Clinical Professor, Coordinator of Experiential Learning
Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences Department

11/30/17

Sheila M. Cronin, MCAT `74, published a new novel Best of All Gifts which is a continuation of her award-winning novel, The Gift Counselor.
 
Jennifer M. Rule, BS `00, senior manager of credential services at ECFMG, was recognized on the Philadelphia Business Journal’s Leadership Philadelphia, Class of 2018.
 
Jessica A. Heimall, PT, DPT, C/NDT, CBIS, DPT `13, physical therapist and brain injury specialist at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Toms River, New Jersey, was a guest on the Faces of TBI podcast with Amy Zellmer. 
 
Patrick C. Kilduff, DO, MPT ’98, was named best family doctor in the Dallas Post's "Best of the Back Mountain Reader’s Choice Awards" for the second year in a row. Dr. Kilduff is a physician at InterMountain Medical Group in Shavertown, Texas.
 
Jennifer Nolan, MSN `12, PMC `16, psychiatric nurse practitioner at Newport Academy in Connecticut, won a seat on the Thomaston Board of Education in Thomaston, Connecticut.
 

11/29/17

Annette Willgens, PT, PhD and Michele Rattigan, MA, ATR-BC hosted an interprofessional workshop titled “Mindfulness: for Clinical Practice & for Life” on October 4, 2017. In their own words:

Multi-colored mindfulness illustration“We had over 55 students from a variety of CNHP disciplines join us to learn about the theory of mindfulness. Our goal was to introduce students to a practice that could promote self-care and wellness during their time here at Drexel University. In the current culture of esteem building, competition and perfectionism, we challenged students to consider excellence, intention and compassion for oneself instead.

We talked about stress, the allostatic load, self-criticism and conflict and shared the evidence base for mindful practice and the neural circuitry associated with default mode as compared to mindful awareness. We discussed a fMRI scan of "this is your brain on meditation," and then we practiced meditation. Students participated in an art-making activity to elucidate their thoughts and feelings. As we move forward with more planning, we are reminded that shared goals such as student self-care give everyone a strong foundation. Excellence, humility, temperance and resilience—these are the qualities of the future healthcare provider.”

The IPER Collaborative is awed by the many faculty and students who are creating and experiencing enriched learning opportunities with their CNHP peers. Any faculty member who has an idea about developing an interprofessional experience or project should contact iper@drexel.edu or any IPER Collaborative member. We are happy to support you in your endeavors!

 

Thank you, 

IPER Collaborative

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