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Creative Arts Therapies Department

Innovative Courses Taught By Field Leaders

Internationally recognized faculty train culturally aware and culturally sensitive therapists dedicated to serving a diverse client base.

Creative Arts Therapies Department

Innovative Courses Taught By Field Leaders

Internationally recognized faculty train culturally aware and culturally sensitive therapists dedicated to serving a diverse client base.

Creative Arts Therapies Department

Innovative Courses Taught By Field Leaders

Internationally recognized faculty train culturally aware and culturally sensitive therapists dedicated to serving a diverse client base.

Creative Arts Therapies Department

The Department of Creative Arts Therapies provides students with the most comprehensive and the highest-quality education in their respective creative arts therapy discipline.

Through an integrated blend of classroom, experiential and practical learning in the field, students learn side-by-side with future colleagues in the other creative arts therapy specialties.

Program courses are taught by faculty that are national leaders in their respective fields. Students take advantage of Philadelphia’s lively arts community, which nourishes the artist, dancer and musician within and enables you to continue practicing your art form while pursuing graduate study.

The Department and Diversity

As a community of learners, Drexel’s Department of Creative Arts Therapies is committed to cultivating a diverse and dynamic student population. We are interested in, and enriched by, diversity, including but not limited to: culture, race, ethnicity, gender identification and expression, socio-economic class, religion, nationality, sexual orientation, age, learning styles, and political perspectives. We value these identities, shaped by experience, which support empathetic understanding and enlivened critical thinking in and outside of the classroom and in field placements.

Here in this community, we are aware of our past and present shortcomings and deficiencies. We understand that our programs, like the society in which we live, have too long habitually failed to provide just and plentiful opportunities and resources to all people, a perpetual misstep that has resulted in recurrent exclusion for some and disproportionate inclusion for others. We strive for an expansion of diversity. We recognize, embrace and proclaim that it is only by welcoming all people that we may reach our full, and true, potential as an educational community.

Programs

The Department of Creative Arts Therapies offers three Master of Arts degrees: Art Therapy and Counseling, Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling, and Music Therapy and Counseling. The 90 quarter-credit curricula can be completed in two years on a full-time basis. We encourage full-time enrollment, yet part-time study can be arranged.

We also offer a PhD in Creative Arts Therapies, an innovative and unique research degree for art therapists, dance/movement therapists, and music therapists who are interested in focusing their careers on scholarly pursuits and academic leadership in their specific discipline.

Master of Arts in Art Therapy and Counseling
Engage in art therapy at a prestigious health center aligned to a school of fine arts.

Master of Arts in Dance/Movement Therapy Counseling
Integrate dance and movement into a whole-body approach to mental health.

Master of Arts in Music Therapy and Counseling
Study in the only music therapy program housed within an academic health center.

PhD in Creative Arts Therapies
Earn your PhD in a culture of creativity, innovation, initiative, and support.

Creative Arts Therapies Faculty

View Profiles

News & Events

 

01/12/18

What are creative arts therapies? As a part of introducing the clinical creative arts therapies practice at Parkway Health and Wellness (PHW), it is important to start with what we are not: We are not scarf throwing, paint splashing, let-it-all-out drum-circling free spirits. We also do not provide coloring book activities or dance or music classes. We are educated professional masters and doctoral level psychotherapists and counselors who are also artists, musicians and dancers. The National Coalition of Creative Arts Therapies Associations, Inc. identifies that “Creative Arts Therapists are human service professionals who use arts modalities and creative processes for the purpose of ameliorating disability and illness and optimizing health and wellness.

Children with music therapistCreative arts therapists work from a variety of theoretical frameworks to support clients’ kinesthetic, sensory, affective, perceptual, cognitive and symbolic growth. These components are necessary to help individuals gain personal insight, problem solve, shift perspective, develop and maintain healthy interpersonal relationships, effectively manage change and experience an overall sense of well-being, just to name a few. Our clinical team is currently represented by two art therapists, a dance movement therapist, two music therapists and creative art therapies PhD students. As credentialed creative arts therapists, our mission is to provide treatment utilizing the healing power of the arts within the safety of a therapeutic relationship. We honor the diversity of our clients’ cultures, abilities and values. We strive to be a creative arts therapies resource for our clients and local community through therapy, outreach, education and advocacy.

We are currently serving individuals who experience:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Eating disorders
  • Poor body image 
  • Dissociation
  • Trauma
  • Foster care transition
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Self-injury
  • Brain injury
  • Schizophrenia
  • And those on ASD spectrum

Personal accounts from clients attending either art, music or dance movement therapy at PHW include the appreciation of finding an alternative way to express thoughts and feelings that are often difficult to put into words. Just as a dreamer once said to psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, “I can draw it, but I don’t know how to say it.”

From 2016-17 over 570 visits were made to the Creative Arts Therapies program at Parkway Health and Wellness (PHW). Our reach into the community has been growing thanks to the work of our dedicated clinical team.

For more information about our creative arts therapies services at PHW, please contact CATappts@drexel.edu or Michele Rattigan, creative arts therapies clinical coordinator at mdr33@drexel.edu.

Written by Michele Rattigan, MA, ATR-BC, NCC, LPC
Assistat Clinical Professor
Creative Arts Therapies Clinical Coordinator

01/12/18

The College of Nursing and Health Professions has clinical services in four established Philadelphia-based sites in addition to a new Community Wellness HUB established this year in the Dornsife Center. Services are provided by faculty working in conjunction with bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral students, as well as orthopedic physical therapy residents.  The ultimate goal of the CNHP clinical services programming is to have an educational environment where students working alongside the more than 30 CNHP faculty, provide patient care in an interdisciplinary setting, including referrals between active clinical practice and research activities. CNHP’s clinical services and associated student education has continued to grow in scope and volume over the years. A broad overview of each practice is below.

The CNHP clinical services are located in Philadelphia at the following sites:

  • Stephen & Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services Center  
  • 3020 Market Street (3020 Market)
  • Drexel Recreation Center (REC)
  • Parkway Health & Wellness (PHW)
  • Community Wellness HUB at the Dornsife (The HUB)
Discipline/Sites                      3020 Market REC Center Parkway Health and Wellness The Community Wellness HUB
 Nurse Practitioner     

 Counseling and Family Therapy
 

 Creative Arts Therapies    
 
 Nutrition Scrience  

 
 Physician Assistant    

 Physical Therapy  

 

CNHP faculty are providing services in most disciplines across all Philadelphia sites.

Discipline CNHP Faculty Practicing at Clinical Sites
Nurse Practitioner Barbara Posmontier,  Kimberly McClellan, Barbara Osborne, Ann McQueen
Counseling and Family Therapy
Christian Jordal, Erica Wilkins 
Creative Arts Therapies
Yasmine Awais, Scott Horowitz, Dawn Morningstar, Michele Rattigan, Ellen Schelly-Hill 
Nutrition Scrience
Whitney Butler, Robin Danowski, Nyree Dardarian, Abigail Duffine-Gilman, Andrea Grasso-Irvine, Beth Leonberg, Angela Luciani, Vicki Schwartz, Elizabeth Smith, Amy Stankiewicz 
Physician Assistant
Patrick Auth, Juanita Gardner 
Physical Therapy
Lisa Chiarello, Kevin Gard, Noel Goodstadt, Robert Maschi, Christopher McKenzie, Kathryn Mitchell, Sara Tomaszewski, Sarah Wenger, Annette Willgens 

Round-up 

The clinical services are overseen by an interdisciplinary advisory board comprised of the director of CNHP clinical services and clinical coordinators representing each involved academic department and the research enterprise. This advisory board meets regularly to provide oversight and direction for the clinical practices in the areas of operations, productivity review, marketing, program development, and the promotion of collaborative interdisciplinary programming, including collaborations and referrals between clinical services and research projects.

Read the entire round-up including descriptions of each site and the services offered here.

01/11/18

The Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services is a unique nurse-led center serving a broad communityThe Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services (the Center) is a comprehensive, nurse-managed health center run by Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions in collaboration with the Family Practice and Counseling Network. Its mission is to decrease health disparities by providing integrative services and health programs in partnership with the local community. By integrating primary care, behavioral health, mind-body, and other health promotion programs, the Center develops a comprehensive treatment plan to address the biological, psychological, and social needs of the patient all at one site. This system ensures communication and collaboration among patients and staff as they manage current illnesses and prevent future health problems. The Center's roots date back to 1996, when the College of Nursing at MCP/Hahnemann University entered into an agreement with the Philadelphia Housing Authority to address the health issues of 11th Street Corridor residents. The first services offered at the Center focused on health promotion and disease prevention.

The Center's Community Advisory Board, composed of neighborhood residents, later arranged for the Center to use a temporary space for primary care health services at the Harrison Plaza Community Center. As a result of consistent growth and program development, the Center outgrew the original building that had opened in 2002. In June 2015, the 17,000 sq. ft. expansion opened and doubled the Center's size, providing space not only to see more patients but also to improve and expand services.

Over the past 19 years, the Center has become a hub for health-related activity in the community. In addition to the regular services provided at the Center, the staff expanded their reach through public art making, community fitness, food distribution, and partnering with local organizations to promote health care access and healthy living. The Center's goals include strengthening its trauma-informed care to provide a strong foundation for care across the lifespan. In addition, the Center is developing partnerships with schools, faith-based groups, and other organizations to create a shared value of health and promote a healthier community.

News at 11

  • Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Center offers an integrated health care model with many resources available to the community. Though the surrounding community lacks fresh fruits and vegetables, 11th Street strived to fill in the gaps by partnering with two urban farms, Greensgrow and Greener Partners, to host on-site low-cost produce stands twice per week for the summer & fall seasons. Affordable food was available through subsidized programs such as Farms to Families (supported by the St. Christopher’s Foundations) and the Philly Food Bucks Farmers’ Market Vouchers. The center also provides nutrition education for groups and individuals, hosting diabetes prevention and cooking classes throughout the year.
  • Center staff and Community Advisory Committee members pulled together to raise funding for the additional dinner basket items
    This year, with the continued turkey donation from Drexel’s Alumni Association, and the support of The Fresh Grocer at Progress Plaza, Sheller 11th Street Family Health was able to provide turkey dinner baskets to 160 families. Center staff and Community Advisory Committee members pulled together to raise funding for the additional dinner basket items. Half of the donation went to patients who were nominated by center staff. The other half were donated to local organizations, senior housing center, and community groups to be given to families for whom they knew the baskets could bring holiday cheer. There was such a great response, planning has already begun for next year and donation are being accepted a this link.
  • Music therapy with infant at the Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services11th Street is the recipient of two grants from Independence Blue Cross (IBX) totaling $175,000. The award of Targeted Funding Blue Safety Net Grant is for funds to provide continuity of access to high quality behavioral healthcare through Creative Arts Therapies (CATs) modalities—art therapy, dance/movement therapy, and music therapy—for child and adult clients most affected by early childhood trauma and abuse. 11th Street patients have come to rely on CATs as a means to address trauma symptoms, and garner adaptive coping skills, through increasing awareness of psychological, somatic, behavioral and spiritual patterns. A number of studies have shown that individuals who are the victims of adverse childhood experiences who participate in creative arts therapies (CAT) programs subsequently experience a reduction in anxiety, dissociation, flashbacks, relationship struggles, isolation and depressive symptoms and an increase in self-efficacy, self-esteem, body awareness/attunement, parenting efficacy, sleep, healthy eating, exercise, and recreational activities, all of which result in better-functioning adults.* (*Cruz RF, Sabers DS. (1998). Dance movement therapy is more effective than previously reported. The Arts in Psychotherapy 25(2):101-104)

The IBX Core Support Blue Safety Net Grant will increase capacity and sustainability of the Center by implementing components of the 3.0 transformation to achieve the following: target key stages in the life course (adolescent populations and older adults transitioning to Medicare); develop a cohort of patient advocates; and strengthen the No Wrong Door concept to support individuals' access to needed services and health promotion programs.

Yoga class at The Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health ServicesThe 3.0 Transformation Framework (3.0) posited by Neal Halfon and colleagues optimizes the health of the population through primary prevention, health promotion and community-integrated health delivery systems that continuously seek to improve quality through a learning health system—a system striving to promote wellness and achieve optimal lifelong health. 3.0 emphasizes not only activated patients but also engaged communities and motivated populations focused on creating local conditions that support health over the life course. Individuals therefore become designers and co-producers of their lifelong health development.

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