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Nutrition Science Department

Discover Your Passion

Our exciting programs offer more than just the basics – we train highly competent registered dieticians and leaders in nutrition research that will change the diet and nutrition landscape. Let us show you how.

Nutrition Sciences Department

The Department of Nutrition Sciences at Drexel University is paving the way for future researchers and registered dietitians. Our Bachelors of Science, Masters and PhD programs prepare students to work in a variety of careers that span the gamut from community work and clinical practice to cutting edge research.

This is a particularly exciting time for nutritionists since so many individuals are taking responsibility for maintaining and enhancing their health. We are committed to the discovery of new information about the relationships between diet, physical activity, health and disease and the application of such knowledge to individuals, communities and entire populations.

In September 2011, the Department of Nutrition Sciences, Drexel Recreation Center and University Wellness collaboratively formed the Drexel Center for Integrated Nutrition & Performance (CINP), with the mission of providing evidence-based nutrition advice to the Drexel Community and the greater Philadelphia area. The Center offers year-long internships for selected undergraduate and graduate students from the Department of Nutrition Sciences. This provides exceptional hands-on experience that prepares students for application to practice programs, employment opportunities and graduate programs.

Center for Nutrition & Performance (CNP)
Drexel’s Center for Nutrition & Performance provides students a hands-on learning experience through the development and implementation of nutrition education programs for members of the Drexel community.

Programs

The following programs are offered through the Department of Nutrition Sciences. Please contact us or plan to visit us if we can provide further information about opportunities in this important discipline that bridges the basic and applied sciences.

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foods
An important component of healthcare, dietetics involves helping people meet their nutritional needs through diet counseling and nutrition support.

Master of Science in Human Nutrition
If you have a desire to promote optimal wellness for people of all ages through better nutrition and become a registered dietitian, this may be of interest to you.

PhD in Nutrition Sciences
An innovative PhD program that positions graduates as unique PhD-educated nutritionists.

Minor in Nutrition and Foods

Human Lactation Consultant Program
The Drexel University Nutrition Sciences Human Lactation Consultant Program is designed to provide an opportunity for individuals to prepare to become Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs).

The Individualized Supervised Practice Pathway (ISPP)
An ACEND approved program allowing students who have graduated from a DPD program to complete the 1,200 hours of supervised practice necessary to complete the path to registration.

Nutrition Sciences Faculty

View Profiles

News & Events

 

01/12/18

The College of Nursing and Health Professions has clinical services in four established Philadelphia-based sites in addition to a new Community Wellness HUB established this year in the Dornsife Center. Services are provided by faculty working in conjunction with bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral students, as well as orthopedic physical therapy residents.  The ultimate goal of the CNHP clinical services programming is to have an educational environment where students working alongside the more than 30 CNHP faculty, provide patient care in an interdisciplinary setting, including referrals between active clinical practice and research activities. CNHP’s clinical services and associated student education has continued to grow in scope and volume over the years. A broad overview of each practice is below.

The CNHP clinical services are located in Philadelphia at the following sites:

  • Stephen & Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services Center  
  • 3020 Market Street (3020 Market)
  • Drexel Recreation Center (REC)
  • Parkway Health & Wellness (PHW)
  • Community Wellness HUB at the Dornsife (The HUB)
Discipline/Sites                      3020 Market REC Center Parkway Health and Wellness The Community Wellness HUB
 Nurse Practitioner     

 Counseling and Family Therapy
 

 Creative Arts Therapies    
 
 Nutrition Scrience  

 
 Physician Assistant    

 Physical Therapy  

 

CNHP faculty are providing services in most disciplines across all Philadelphia sites.

Discipline CNHP Faculty Practicing at Clinical Sites
Nurse Practitioner Barbara Posmontier,  Kimberly McClellan, Barbara Osborne, Ann McQueen
Counseling and Family Therapy
Christian Jordal, Erica Wilkins 
Creative Arts Therapies
Yasmine Awais, Scott Horowitz, Dawn Morningstar, Michele Rattigan, Ellen Schelly-Hill 
Nutrition Scrience
Whitney Butler, Robin Danowski, Nyree Dardarian, Abigail Duffine-Gilman, Andrea Grasso-Irvine, Beth Leonberg, Angela Luciani, Vicki Schwartz, Elizabeth Smith, Amy Stankiewicz 
Physician Assistant
Patrick Auth, Juanita Gardner 
Physical Therapy
Lisa Chiarello, Kevin Gard, Noel Goodstadt, Robert Maschi, Christopher McKenzie, Kathryn Mitchell, Sara Tomaszewski, Sarah Wenger, Annette Willgens 

Round-up 

The clinical services are overseen by an interdisciplinary advisory board comprised of the director of CNHP clinical services and clinical coordinators representing each involved academic department and the research enterprise. This advisory board meets regularly to provide oversight and direction for the clinical practices in the areas of operations, productivity review, marketing, program development, and the promotion of collaborative interdisciplinary programming, including collaborations and referrals between clinical services and research projects.

Read the entire round-up including descriptions of each site and the services offered here.

01/11/18

The Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services is a unique nurse-led center serving a broad communityThe Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services (the Center) is a comprehensive, nurse-managed health center run by Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions in collaboration with the Family Practice and Counseling Network. Its mission is to decrease health disparities by providing integrative services and health programs in partnership with the local community. By integrating primary care, behavioral health, mind-body, and other health promotion programs, the Center develops a comprehensive treatment plan to address the biological, psychological, and social needs of the patient all at one site. This system ensures communication and collaboration among patients and staff as they manage current illnesses and prevent future health problems. The Center's roots date back to 1996, when the College of Nursing at MCP/Hahnemann University entered into an agreement with the Philadelphia Housing Authority to address the health issues of 11th Street Corridor residents. The first services offered at the Center focused on health promotion and disease prevention.

The Center's Community Advisory Board, composed of neighborhood residents, later arranged for the Center to use a temporary space for primary care health services at the Harrison Plaza Community Center. As a result of consistent growth and program development, the Center outgrew the original building that had opened in 2002. In June 2015, the 17,000 sq. ft. expansion opened and doubled the Center's size, providing space not only to see more patients but also to improve and expand services.

Over the past 19 years, the Center has become a hub for health-related activity in the community. In addition to the regular services provided at the Center, the staff expanded their reach through public art making, community fitness, food distribution, and partnering with local organizations to promote health care access and healthy living. The Center's goals include strengthening its trauma-informed care to provide a strong foundation for care across the lifespan. In addition, the Center is developing partnerships with schools, faith-based groups, and other organizations to create a shared value of health and promote a healthier community.

News at 11

  • Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Center offers an integrated health care model with many resources available to the community. Though the surrounding community lacks fresh fruits and vegetables, 11th Street strived to fill in the gaps by partnering with two urban farms, Greensgrow and Greener Partners, to host on-site low-cost produce stands twice per week for the summer & fall seasons. Affordable food was available through subsidized programs such as Farms to Families (supported by the St. Christopher’s Foundations) and the Philly Food Bucks Farmers’ Market Vouchers. The center also provides nutrition education for groups and individuals, hosting diabetes prevention and cooking classes throughout the year.
  • Center staff and Community Advisory Committee members pulled together to raise funding for the additional dinner basket items
    This year, with the continued turkey donation from Drexel’s Alumni Association, and the support of The Fresh Grocer at Progress Plaza, Sheller 11th Street Family Health was able to provide turkey dinner baskets to 160 families. Center staff and Community Advisory Committee members pulled together to raise funding for the additional dinner basket items. Half of the donation went to patients who were nominated by center staff. The other half were donated to local organizations, senior housing center, and community groups to be given to families for whom they knew the baskets could bring holiday cheer. There was such a great response, planning has already begun for next year and donation are being accepted a this link.
  • Music therapy with infant at the Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services11th Street is the recipient of two grants from Independence Blue Cross (IBX) totaling $175,000. The award of Targeted Funding Blue Safety Net Grant is for funds to provide continuity of access to high quality behavioral healthcare through Creative Arts Therapies (CATs) modalities—art therapy, dance/movement therapy, and music therapy—for child and adult clients most affected by early childhood trauma and abuse. 11th Street patients have come to rely on CATs as a means to address trauma symptoms, and garner adaptive coping skills, through increasing awareness of psychological, somatic, behavioral and spiritual patterns. A number of studies have shown that individuals who are the victims of adverse childhood experiences who participate in creative arts therapies (CAT) programs subsequently experience a reduction in anxiety, dissociation, flashbacks, relationship struggles, isolation and depressive symptoms and an increase in self-efficacy, self-esteem, body awareness/attunement, parenting efficacy, sleep, healthy eating, exercise, and recreational activities, all of which result in better-functioning adults.* (*Cruz RF, Sabers DS. (1998). Dance movement therapy is more effective than previously reported. The Arts in Psychotherapy 25(2):101-104)

The IBX Core Support Blue Safety Net Grant will increase capacity and sustainability of the Center by implementing components of the 3.0 transformation to achieve the following: target key stages in the life course (adolescent populations and older adults transitioning to Medicare); develop a cohort of patient advocates; and strengthen the No Wrong Door concept to support individuals' access to needed services and health promotion programs.

Yoga class at The Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health ServicesThe 3.0 Transformation Framework (3.0) posited by Neal Halfon and colleagues optimizes the health of the population through primary prevention, health promotion and community-integrated health delivery systems that continuously seek to improve quality through a learning health system—a system striving to promote wellness and achieve optimal lifelong health. 3.0 emphasizes not only activated patients but also engaged communities and motivated populations focused on creating local conditions that support health over the life course. Individuals therefore become designers and co-producers of their lifelong health development.

01/09/18

When the Community Wellness HUB began welcoming neighborhood residents to take advantage of its health and wellness programming back in April 2017, it was the culmination of more than a year of careful community-driven planning. The planning process was led by Mantua native and Drexel Vice President of Health and Health Equity, Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD and her team. Known as We're Here Because We Care, the process was made up of call-to-action meetings, community focus groups and one-on-one meetings with local leaders and residents.

The initiative, the strategy and the process were developed and designed by Jemmott and her team, as they noticed community input was missing in many of the local health conversations. Each of the team members came to the table with an expertise that allowed this initiative to flourish. Andrew Issa, MPH brought a programming and community partnership lens, Marcia Penn, MEd brought her coordinating expertise, and K. Rose Samuel-Evans brought her community engagement background. It is this core team that became the think tank behind this health initiative and the Community Wellness HUB.

PromiseZone boaundaries mapWe're Here Because We Care concentrated on the West Philadelphia Promise Zone: Mantua, Belmont, West Powelton, Powelton Village, Saunders Park, Mill Creek, East Parkside and parts of Spruce Hill, Walnut Hill and University City. Invitations went to neighborhood residents but also to civic organizations, nonprofits serving the area, faith-based organizations, recreation centers, registered community organizations, community centers, block captains and town watch groups. Each of these meetings asked participants to identify their top health and wellness concerns and interests, and to talk about the kinds of healthcare supports they were looking for in the neighborhood. Consensus developed around seven key health issues:

  1. Chronic Diseases: These are the kinds of diseases that require sometimes lifelong management and support. Heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, and cancer are chronic diseases that can be helped with diet, exercise and medications, but they can also be dififcult and confusing to understand.
  2. Behavioral and Mental Health: Behavioral health stigmas get in the way of people getting the help they need. Participants wanted services to support people dealing with depression, anxiety, emotional pain, intimate partner or child abuse and trauma. 
  3. Sexual Health: Screening, treatment and counseling for HIV and sexually transmitted infections, and support for sexual health issues across all ages was a top concern.
  4. Access to Healthy Foods: Neighborhood residents across the board are interested in workshops on nutrition and healthy food preparation, in how to get healthy food in a food desert, gardening and mobile fresh food sales.
  5. Environmental Health: Home environments have a substantial impact on our health, and as such there was an emphasis placed on safe and healthy homes, rodent control, dealing with trash and aging-in-place.
  6. Access to Care: Neighbors are especially interested in health services located in the community that are also culturally appropriate and culturally sensitive. 
  7. Access to Safe Physical Fitness: Feeling safe in the neighborhood makes it possible to get outside to walk, run and play. Participants expressed the need for safe places to move around, programs designed for seniors and physical fitness programs tailored for all ages. 

Neighborhood residents of the Mantua and Powelton Village communitiesThe team at the Community Wellness HUB has integrated these priorities and ideas into its program planning and invite you to join their upcoming workshops, to visit to make an appointment to talk about your health or just to drop in to say hello and share your feedback.

As Mantua Civic Association president DeWayne Drummond notes, “Having the Community Wellness HUB in Mantua is a priceless gift to our community. When we work together, poverty stricken areas can receive true equity."

Written by Jennifer Britton
Associate Director, Communications & Special Projects
Office of University & Community Partnerships

 

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