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Health

The Disaster Simulation lab is a required rite of passage for all of Drexel’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students, and is a key component of the class titled “Population Health Concepts.” It simulates the worst-case, yet realistic scenarios that nurses might come across in their career.

Disaster Simulation Lab Helps Drexel Nursing Students Prepare for the Worst-Case Scenarios

The College of Nursing and Health Professions puts a lot of resources and manpower into making sure that senior nursing students know how to tackle a “really bad day” through required simulation lab nestled in “Population Health Concepts” class.

smog

Suffocating Ozone — Policies That Stem Emission of Precursor Chemicals Save Lives and Crops

An international team of environmental and atmospheric scientists have pinpointed the chemical emissions that contribute the most to the harmful air quality conditions that are choking more and more cities and causing health problems and reducing agricultural production across the United States. The findings suggest that targeted policies could be more effective in limiting the formation of ground-level ozone, like smog, which contributes to tens of thousands of respiratory related deaths and nearly a billion dollars of crop loss each year.
St. Christopher's Hospital for Children.

FAQ: An Update on the St. Christopher’s Hospital Acquisition

Drexel and Tower Health recently purchased St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children from bankruptcy in a $50 million deal.
children's building blocks with Drexel, Tower Health and St. Christopher's logos

Drexel and Tower Health Finalize Acquisition of St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children

Tower Health and Drexel University have completed the acquisition of St. Christopher's Hospital for Children from St. Christopher's Healthcare, LLC, a subsidiary of American Academic Health System. The acquisition was finalized on Dec. 13 with an effective date of Dec. 15.
microbes

Teams of Microbes Are at Work in Our Bodies. Drexel Researchers Have Figured Out What They’re up to.

An algorithm akin to the annoyingly helpful one that attempts to auto-complete text messages and emails is now being harnessed for a better cause. A group of Drexel University researchers are using its pattern-recognition ability to identify microbial communities in the body by sifting through volumes of genetic code. Their method could speed the development of medical treatments for microbiota-linked ailments like Crohn’s disease.

Hand treated with rapymycin alongside placebo untreated hand

Rapamycin May Slow Skin Aging, Drexel Study Reports

The search for youthfulness typically turns to lotions, supplements, serums and diets, but there may soon be a new option joining the fray. Rapamycin, a FDA-approved drug normally used to prevent organ rejection after transplant surgery, may also slow aging in human skin, according to a study from Drexel University College of Medicine researchers published in Geroscience.

Can better messaging on instagram improve vaccination rates?

Trying to Help Parents Decide to Vaccinate Kids Against HPV? Consider Storytelling.

Health campaigns on social media aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination may see greater success, according to Drexel University researchers, if they inject a narrative into information-based posts.

Vaccine legislation increase where outbreaks occured

Disease Outbreaks Are Increasing. A Drexel Study Shows that Legislators are Taking Action

Vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) outbreaks are increasing in frequency in the United States, but this trend is also met with an uptick in legislation aimed at increasing childhood vaccination in places where those epidemics occurred, according to findings published today in JAMA Pediatrics from researchers at the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University.
Hahnemann unit of the Student Army Training Corps in 1918, including students still in training at the end of World War I (classes 1919–1922) on the steps of the Broad Street college building. Photo courtesy Legacy Center Archives, Drexel College of Medicine.

An Exhibit Epitaph Honoring 171 Years of Hahnemann History

The Drexel Collection, in collaboration with the College of Medicine's Legacy Center Archives, has unveiled Honoring the Hahnemann Community, which recognizes the pioneering legacy of Hahnemann University Hospital from 1848 to 2019.
Police officer

A.J. Drexel Autism Institute Awarded Grant to Improve Interactions Between Individuals with Autism and Criminal Justice System

The International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) has awarded a competitive grant to local leaders from the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute and the Philadelphia Police Department, who are working to improve interactions between autistic individuals and the justice system, and fund international meeting in Philadelphia 2020. 
Virtual reality 3D drawing of a flower

Is Virtual Reality the Next Big Thing in Art Therapy?

Researchers from Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions in the Creative Arts Therapies Department conducted a study to see if creative arts therapies is the next frontier for virtual reality in health care.
Obstacles remain for many women in pediatrics

Long Considered a More Inclusive Field for Women, Wide-ranging Disparities Remain in Pediatrics

 

Three commonly argued justifications for the persistent discrimination and gender bias that prevent women from rising to leadership positions in the field of pediatric medicine have been debunked by a Drexel University College of Medicine researcher and colleagues in a special article published in the November 2019 issue of the journal Pediatrics. The article goes a step further, arguing that gender equity can be fostered by employing the same basic scientific principles used in solving other problems in medicine.

office plants

Study: Actually, Potted Plants Don't Improve Air Quality

A closer look at decades of research suggesting that potted plants can improve the air in homes and offices reveals the findings don’t hold up outside of the lab.