Yury Gogotsi, PhD

Distinguished University and Bach Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Gogotsi is the director of the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute and leads research in the Nanomaterials Research Group in the College of Engineering. He is a foremost expert on carbon-based nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanodiamonds, nanoporous carbons, carbon onions and carbides) and is pioneering the use of new materials, such as MXenes, for energy storage.

His work on materials for energy storage has been published in the top scientific journals (Science, Nature, Nature Materials, etc.) and he has commented in the media on stories related to batteries, renewable energy and energy storage. Gogotsi has been recognized with numerous national and international awards in his field including the 2014 Fred Kavli Distinguished Lectureship from the Materials Research Society, Ross Coffin Purdy award from the American Ceramic Society and the 2012 European Carbon Association Award. His name is included in the list of highly cited researchers published by Thomson-Reuters in 2014. 

Related from the Drexel News Blog

In The News

New Faraday Cages Can Be Switched Off and on Built Out of a Novel Material Called Mxene, These Cages Could Block and Allow Signals as Desired
Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Jan. 27 IEEE-Spectrum story about his group’s research to develop a MXene coating that can block electromagnetic radiation and be switched on and off.
Hero City
Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Dec. 7 Science feature about academics from Kharkiv, Ukraine that have been displaced by the war and their efforts to rebuild the city and its research centers.
The Radioactive Diamond Battery That Will Run For 28,000 Years
Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Sept. 2 Popular Mechanics story about a type of long-lasting battery that uses radioactive diamonds.
A Decade of Discovery: A Review of MXenes, the Family of 2D Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides
The American Ceramic Society’s news blog featured the history of MXene research in a June 15 post based on a recently published review paper by Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, and Armin Vahid Mohammadi, PhD, an assistant research professor in the College.
Nephra Bio Licenses Nanomaterial Technology From Drexel To Improve Dialysis
Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a May 5 Tech Transfer Central blog post about Nephria Bio’s licensing of MXene technology he helped to develop and study at Drexel.
Strain Could Switch on Diamond for Optoelectronics
Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an April 28 Materials Today post about a new technique for using nanodiamonds in optoelectronics.
Super-Slippery 2d Material Could Be Ideal Lubricant for Planetary Rovers
Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a March 24 Chemistry World story about research from the University of Missouri and Argonne National Lab looking at the possibility of using MXene as a lubricant for aerospace vehicles.
Fabric With Mxene Can Block Electromagnetic Waves
Research by Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, and Genevieve Dion, a professor in Westphal College and director of the Center for Functional Fabrics, about MXene-coated fabric that can block electromagnetic interference, was featured in a Jan. 25 Advanced Textiles Source post.

Related Articles

Powering Wearable Technology with MXene Textile Supercapactior 'Patch'
Researchers at Drexel University are one step closer to making wearable textile technology a reality. Recently published in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Journal of Material’s Chemistry A, materials scientists from Drexel’s College of Engineering, in partnership with a team at Accenture Labs, have reported a new design of a flexible wearable supercapacitor patch.
Blocking Radio Waves and Electromagnetic Interference with the Flip of a Switch
Researchers in Drexel University’s College of Engineering have developed a thin film device, fabricated by spray coating, that can block electromagnetic radiation with the flip of a switch. The breakthrough, enabled by versatile two-dimensional materials called MXenes, could adjust the performance of electronic devices, strengthen wireless connections and secure mobile communications against intrusion.
Blocking the Buzz: MXene Composite Could Eliminate Electromagnetic Interference by Absorbing It
A recent discovery by materials science researchers in Drexel University’s College of Engineering might one day prevent electronic devices and components from going haywire when they’re too close to one another.
Yuri Gogotsi A Scientist Stands with Ukraine
Yury Gogotsi is devoting time and his remarkable talent to aid his colleagues in war-torn Ukraine.
New Technique Allows Drexel Researchers to Scrape Beyond the Surface of Nanomaterials
A new technology and approach has allowed a team of Drexel University researchers to peer within the atomic layers of two-dimensional materials to better understand the connection between their form and function.
MXene Major MXene Conference Comes to Drexel
Second international MXene conference will bring together leading players in materials science.
A Unified Theory of Electrochemical Energy Storage: Bridging Batteries and Supercapacitors
An international team of researchers, including Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi, PhD, has proposed that electrochemical energy storage mechanisms exist on a spectrum that ranges between physical and chemical retention of ions.
Medical Device Startup Nephria Bio to Use Drexel's MXene Filter Materials in Wearable Artificial Kidney Technology

Drexel University’s MXene material is one step closer to transforming the lives of people suffering from end-stage kidney disease. Nephria Bio, Inc., a U.S.-based spin-off of the South Korean medical device company EOFlow Co., Ltd., has signed a licensing agreement with the University to use the two-dimensional material, discovered at Drexel, as a filter in a wearable artificial kidney device it is developing. The technology could allow many of the millions of people suffering from end-stage kidney disease worldwide to move more freely, without spending hours each week anchored to large dialysis machines.