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Master of Arts in Dance and Movement Therapy Counseling

Program

Established in 1974, the Master of Arts program in Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling educates students for creative, responsive and effective therapy practice. This unique program addresses both the art and science of dance/movement therapy. The graduate work develops students' personal, creative, cognitive, and movement resources so they can effectively engage in therapeutic movement relationships that facilitate access to these resources in their clients.

Dance/movement therapy is defined as the psychotherapeutic use of movement in a process that furthers the emotional, cognitive, social, and physical integration of the individual. The profession is positioned to meet an increasing interest in mind-body approaches to mental and physical health that have emerged in health profession circles and in the general public.

Upon graduation, students go on to work in schools, early intervention programs, community mental health, inpatient psychiatric, medical, social service, and wellness settings. Students also pioneer new frontiers in therapy application.

The Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling program's 90-quarter-credit curriculum is designed to meet the Pennsylvania Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) educational requirements. Be advised, however, that licensure requirements vary widely from state to state, and may change at any time. Therefore, if you are or will be interested in counseling licensure in the future, you are strongly advised to access and check the requirements for any state(s) in which you plan to work and practice. It is the student's responsibility to know and understand the requirements for any type of future licensure.

What you'll learn

The Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling program integrates dance and movement into a whole-person approach to mental health.

Students learn to apply the Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) to the evaluation of individual and group functioning and to the design of therapy interventions. The program also recognizes the importance of the therapist's function on a treatment team and fosters students' abilities to communicate valuable knowledge that may not be available to the team through strictly verbal treatment approaches.

Key program components include:

  • Collaborative education in a small dance/movement therapy student cohort.
  • An educational environment vitalized by faculty member involvement in clinical practice, scholarship, and professional service.
  • Supervised dance/movement therapy clinical education experiences in three different settings, with various patient populations, beginning in the first term of study.
  • Ongoing integration of theory and practice in classroom and clinical education settings.
  • Preparation to serve multiculturally diverse populations.
  • Introduction to recent developments in neuroscience as relevant to the mind-body discipline of dance/movement therapy.
  • Dance/movement therapy research and capstone project guided by a multidisciplinary advisory committee.

What makes the Drexel Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling program unique?

  • Learning enrichment derived from interaction with students and faculty from other creative arts therapy disciplines.
  • Specialty elective coursework in medical applications of dance/movement therapy.
  • Opportunity to enroll in dance classes and audition for the Drexel Dance Ensemble.
  • You are part of the Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions with access to various practice environments and educational facilities.

COMPLIANCE

The College of Nursing and Health Professions has a compliance process that may be required for every student. Some of these steps may take significant time to complete. Please plan accordingly.

Visit the Compliance pages for more information.

Admission Requirements

Background checks:
As a student of the College of Nursing and Health Professions you will be required to satisfactorily complete a criminal background check, child and elder abuse checks, drug test, immunizations, physical exams, health history, and/or other types of screening before being permitted to begin clinical training.

You will not need to submit documentation of these requirements as part of your application to the master's program. Failure to fully satisfy these requirements as directed upon enrollment may prevent assignment to a clinical site for training. A background check that reflects a conviction of a felony or misdemeanor may affect your ability to be placed in certain facilities, and later, to become board certified and licensed.

Deadline:
February 1, 2021

Degree:
Bachelor's degree in any field from an accredited institution, with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in all previous coursework.

Standardized Tests:
N/A

Transcripts:

  • Official transcripts must be sent directly to Drexel from all the colleges/universities that you have attended. Transcripts must be submitted in a sealed envelope with the college/university seal over the flap to Drexel University, Application Processing, PO Box 34789, Philadelphia, PA 19101 or submitted through a secure electronic delivery service to enroll@drexel.edu. Please note that transcripts are required regardless of number of credits taken or if the credits were transferred to another school. An admission decision may be delayed if you do not send transcripts from all colleges/universities attended.
  • Transcripts must show course-by-course grades and degree conferrals. If your school does not notate degree conferrals on the official transcripts, you must provide copies of any graduate or degree certificates.
  • If your school issues only one transcript for life, you are required to have a course-by-course evaluation completed by an approved transcript evaluation agency.
  • Use our Transcript Lookup Tool to assist you in contacting your previous institutions.

Prerequisites:

  • Familiarity with at least two dance or movement forms, with a minimum of five years dedicated study to at least one form in a studio or academic setting.
  • Creative dance or movement improvisation experience.
  • Teaching, performing and/or choreography experience preferred.
  • Liberal Arts coursework, including coursework in Social Sciences (Psychology, Sociology, Human Development or Anthropology).
  • Volunteer or paid experience in a helping relationship.

References:
Three letters of recommendation required. At least two recommendations should be from current or former academic instructors. Letters of recommendation should be requested and submitted electronically through your online application.

    Personal Statement/ Essay:
    Submit an essay (1–3 typed pages) addressing interest in and aptitude for dance/movement therapy and counseling, with reference to personal, service, and arts experience. Submit your essay with your application or through the Discover Drexel portal after you submit your application.

    Résumé

    Upload your résumé as part of your admission application or through the Discover Drexel Portal after you submit your application.

    Select candidates will be invited to participate in an on-campus audition and interview. International applicants will be invited to submit a recorded audition and participate in a video interview.

    Audition: The movement audition involves a group improvisational experience. We are primarily interested in how you communicate, express yourself and interact through movement. Applicants need not prepare anything. Those living overseas may submit videotape or DVD in lieu of movement audition. International candidates should request instructions about these requirements with admission materials and are advised to begin admission process early.

    Interview:
    Faculty will conduct in-depth in-person interview with applicant consisting of review of personal, academic, interpersonal, and creative aptitudes. For international applicants will be invited to submit a recorded audition and participate in a video interview.

    Clinical/Work/Volunteer Experience:
    A social service work or volunteer history and cross cultural experience is highly valued.

    Dance Experience
    Familiarity with at least two dance or movement forms, with five years of dedicated study to at least one form in a studio or academic setting. Improvisation, teaching, performing, and/or choreography experience preferred.

    Additional Requirements for International Applicants

    • Transcript Evaluation: All international students applying to a graduate program must have their transcripts evaluated by the approved agency: World Education Services (WES), 212.966.6311, Bowling Green Station, P.O. Box 5087, New York, NY 10274-5087, Web site: www.wes.org/.
    • TOEFL: Applicants who have not received a degree in the United States are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). An official score report must be sent directly to Drexel University Application Processing. The minimum TOEFL score is 90, and the minimum IELTS score is 6.5. For more information visit the Web site: www.ets.org, then click on TOEFL.
    • I-20/DS-2019 and Supporting Financial Documents (international students only): After confirming attendance to Drexel, students will receive an email from ISSS with instructions for applying for their i-20/DS-2019 and submitting supporting financial documents.

    International Consultants of Delaware, Inc.
    P.O. Box 8629
    Philadelphia, PA 19101-8629
    215.222.8454, ext. 603

    Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools
    3600 Market St., Suite 400
    Philadelphia, PA 19104-2651
    215.349.8767

    World Education Services, Inc. (WES)
    Bowling Green Station, P.O. Box 5087
    New York, NY 10274-5087
    212.966.6311

    Tuition and Fee Rates:
    Please visit the Tuition and Fee Rates page on Drexel Central

    Application Link (if outside organization):
    N/A

    Curriculum

    The MA in Dance/Movement Therapy & Counseling is a 90-quarter credit program. The program can be completed in a minimum of two years (seven quarters) of full-time study, although some students may take longer to complete all requirements, or opt for a decelerated plan of study. The majority of classes are taught in-person on Drexel's College of Nursing and Health Professions campus in Center City, Philadelphia with select classes offered online.

    The coursework consists of both Dance/Movement Therapy-specific and general mental health counseling coursework. Dance/Movement Therapy-specific topics include:

    • Theory and practice with child and adult populations
    • Social and cultural foundations in dance/movement therapy
    • Laban movement analysis
    • Movement perspectives in human development
    • Mental health applications of movement assessment
    • Therapy relationship skills
    • Group dynamics in dance/movement therapy
    • Movement observation

    Mental health counseling coursework covers theories and skills in:

    • Human psychological development
    • Psychopathology and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
    • Social and cultural foundations in counseling
    • Behavioral research
    • Group dynamics in counseling
    • Theories of counseling and psychotherapy
    • Career counseling
    • Clinical appraisal and diagnosis
    • Professional ethics
    • Foundations of Creative Art Therapies

    Clinical experience is integrated with classroom learning, with students participating in two practicums and one internship throughout the course of the program. Students receive both individual and small group clinical supervision. For more information on the clinical education component of the Dance/Movement Therapy program, click on the "Clinical Practices" tab above.

    A Culminating Project rounds out the curriculum. Second-or third-year students conduct a Culminating Project that integrates practice with theory and/or research. Under the guidance of their Culminating Project advisor, students design a project that explores aspects of both their respective Creative Arts Therapies discipline and counseling. Examples of Culminating Projects include development of a method, a community engagement project, research thesis or artistic project. Culminating Projects may be connected to a student's internship, but it is not a requirement. At the end of each academic year, students present their Culminating Projects to peers, faculty, friends and family at their respective program's Colloquium. Students are also encouraged to submit projects to regional and national conferences when applicable.

    Accreditation

    The Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling program is approved by the American Dance Therapy Association.

    Clinical Practice

    Students engage in dance/movement therapy clinical education in three different settings during the course of the program. Individual clinical supervision is supplemented by small group mental health and dance/movement therapy supervision in the academic setting, a reflection of the program's commitment to clinical supervision as a learning tool.

    In the first year, students are placed in two practicum experiences, with different patient populations and in different types of settings. The student has the opportunity to observe and practice beginning therapy skills with the role modeling and support of an on-site dance/movement therapist.

    Students are actively involved in the selection of their second year internship sites with respect to their individual learning needs and interests. The second year internship offers an opportunity for students to mature and specialize as clinical interns over the course of a full academic year. The student functions as an integral member of an on-site treatment team. Students participate in individual supervision with a dance/movement therapist holding the advanced credential of BC-DMT (Board Certified Dance Movement Therapist).

    News & Events

    Celebrating Service During National Volunteer Week

    04/20/21

    Building and serving our communities are at the heart of Drexel University’s College of Nursing and Health Professions core values and mission. One of the ways we, faculty, students and professional staff, are encouraged to do this is through civic engagement, and there are many of us that help advance health equity and social justice by volunteering.

    Graphic with statistics about volunteerism in PA

    In Pennsylvania, 3.5M volunteers annually contribute 341 million hours of service, according to a 2018 Volunteering in America report. These PA volunteers spread their time across religious organizations, cultural and arts events, educational and youth services, political, professional or international groups, and environmental or animal care endeavors. For National Volunteer Week, we are highlighting individuals at the college who dedicate their time and talent to causes that are important to them.


    Ann MaddenAnnie Madden, MHS, Assistant Clinical Professor, Physician Assistant Department

    What: Madden has been baking desserts for 70 Meals on Wheels recipients for the last year.
    Why: I provide support to those in my community.
    Benefit: I bake with my sons and husband, so it is a time to be together and give back on a monthly basis.




    Michele Rattigan, MA, Clinical Associate Professor, Creative Arts Therapies and DHSc Student at Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions

    Michele Rattigan, MA, Clinical Associate Professor, Creative Arts Therapies and DHSc Student

    What: Rattigan currently is the Gateway Region Officials coordinator for Odyssey of the Mind: NJ and has served as a board member for ten years.
    Why: I have the opportunity to support children's creativity in STEM fields, or more appropriately, STEAM!
    Benefit: I enjoy the comradery of like-minded individuals who believe, like me, that supporting children's creativity can lead to their future innovations and discoveries to make this world a better place.



    Leon Vinci, DHA, Adjunct Faculty, Health AdministrationLeon Vinci, DHA, Adjunct Faculty in the Health Administration department, Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions

    What: Vinci is the vice president of the Virginia Environmental Health Association board of directors and oversee the statewide scholarship program and assist with the professional development of our membership and other environmental health practitioners across the Commonwealth. He is also the chair the scholarship committee and sits on the corporation board of Faculty for the Knights of Columbus in Roanoke, VA.
    Why: I provide guidance and lend my expertise to this statewide professional organization's services and activities. My volunteering enhances the professionalism of our membership, provides scholarship opportunities for students studying in this field, and moves the agenda forward for statewide environmental health initiatives.
    Benefit: Seeing students benefited by our scholarships move-on to their future careers in Public Health is very rewarding. Often, these emerging health professionals become leaders throughout the field. Giving my time and talent is a great way "to give back" and to assist the goals and services of our group: helping people and improving our community. Providing college scholarship funds to students helps them in many ways. Further, in emphasizing the importance of education, these efforts improve the quality of life and our community.


    Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions' Roberta S. Perry, Assistant Director, Marketing and Communications volunteering at ThyCa conference

    Roberta Perry, Assistant Director, Marketing and Communications

    What: Perry serves at ThyCa: Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Association’s as the newsletter editor, content writer and international conference presenter and mental health and provider/patient relationship advocate.
    Why: My experience as a thyroid cancer patient was fraught with missteps, incomplete information and a false sense of security. I did not know about this organization early enough to make more informed decisions and to know that it's common for doctors to minimize our experiences by calling thyroid cancer the "good cancer." As a survivor, ThyCa has helped me so much in coping with the challenges I continue to face. I want to help others avoid the pitfalls I experienced and to be a sounding board for those who just need to talk to someone who has been in their shoes.
    Benefit: I have met the most incredible people—strong, generous, intelligent and compassionate. It gives me the opportunity to create or strengthen relationships with care providers and learn about the disease and about resilience.



    Joanne Serembus

    Joanne Serembus, EdD, Associate Clinical Professor, Advanced Role Nursing

    What: Serembus is a volunteer for the Chester County Public Health Department dispensing COVID-19 vaccinations.
    Why: We need to get as many vaccinations in arms as possible and I thought this was the least that I could do!
    Benefit: Defeating this virus and helping all of us to be together again as a community.




    Constance Perry, PhD, Drexel University Health Administration dept. volunteering in Friends of High School Park (FHSP)

    Constance Perry, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Administration

    What: Perry is a volunteer at Keystone State Boychoir (KSB)/Friends of High School Park (FHSP) and was elected as a board member January 2021. She is part of the wardrobe committee and fills in as a group manager as needed.
    Why: I began volunteering with yard work at the park, pulling weeds, sawing fallen limbs, raking, etc. Now, as a board member, I also help organize fund raising events to preserve and manage the park's eco-system and support neighborhood programs. I believe in the mission of both organizations. My son successfully auditioned for KSB when he was eight years old; they support the development of boys through joyful music making. KSB even provides music opportunities for schools that have lost their arts programs. This organization warms my heart. FHSP is a chance for me to give back directly to my local community. The park provides so much to me as a place of solace, peace, neighborly fun during Arts in the Park, shade in the summer, etc. I walk the dog there to see flowers, birds, snakes, foxes, butterflies, etc. The park gives so much to me. I want to work to support it.
    Benefit: When you volunteer, you become part of improving the world and meet other kindhearted people. You find joy in the oddest places, like sewing a button or weeding out invasive plants.



    Vaccination Clinic at Mercer County Community College. From left to right: Ellen Giarelli, RN EdD, Drexel University, Stephanie Mendelsonn, Medical Reserve Corps Chris Sntoro, NJ Department of Health

    Ellen Giarelli, EdD, Associate Professor, Graduate Nursing and Nursing PhD

    What: Giarelli has been volunteering at FEMA Medical Reserve Corps of Mercer County New Jersey administering COVID-19 vaccinations and preparing syringes for a year.
    Why: To provide a service to my community. Caption for picture: Vaccination Clinic at Mercer County Community College. From left to right: Ellen Giarelli, EdD, Drexel University, Stephanie Mendelsonn, Medical Reserve Corps, Chris Sntoro, NJ Department of Health
    Benefit: Camaraderie with other health care providers, supporting the emotional needs of vaccine recipients, facilitate distribution of the vaccine.



    Drexel University's Tara Cherwony, BS `18, College of Nursing and Health Professions Recruitment Coordinator, Student Services Department

    Tara Cherwony, BS `18, Recruitment Coordinator, Student Services Department

    What: Cherwony’s volunteering is twofold. She serves on the Jewish Relief Agency (JRA) board of directors and chair their Leadership Academy Program. She also serves as a Yellow Capper and since the pandemic has been in the warehouse several times a month to sort, pack and deliver monthly food boxes to those who are facing food insecurity in the Greater Philadelphia Area.
    Why: I volunteer because I want to be able to give back to the community. I know that regardless of what role I am doing, I am helping get an individual or family food that will take a huge burden off their shoulders every month. Food insecurity (especially since the pandemic) is on the rise, and you never know who may be struggling. With being so hands-on with JRA during the pandemic, I have been able to see the direct impact we make in our client lives.
    Benefit: There are so many but being able to connect with our clients and know the difference we are making in their lives is the biggest reward. It has been so hard over the past year, but seeing the community come together although not physically (pre-pandemic we could have upwards of 1,200 volunteers in the warehouse for our monthly food distribution, but now we can only have 25 at a time) to support JRA’s work as we continue to add new clients each month goes to show just how important volunteering is. It feels great being part of a community of people who do so much good for others.



    Julie Kinzel, MEd, PA-C

    Julie Kinzel, MEd, Interim Department Chair and Program Director, Physician Assistant

    What: For the last 20 years, Kinzel has lead Baptism classes, assisted minister, and done committee work, food donations, code blue homeless shelter work at Trinity Lutheran Church.
    Why: It feels good to give of my time and talents to various endeavors that I care about and to help others.
    Benefit: Volunteering, whether small or large, gives one a sense of pride and overall well-being.




    Jessica Moschette, Drexel University's College on Nursing and Health Professions Health Sciences Student

    Jessica Moschette, Student, Health Sciences

    What: Moschette is a student representative for the Exercise is Medicine-On Campus (EIM-OC) program at Drexel University whose responsibilities include being the voice of the student population. This includes contributing her thoughts, ideas and current news as an undergraduate student during their meetings. She also runs EIM-OC’s social media platforms creating and posting content.
    Why: I volunteer because this program is very important. I am proud to support and dedicate my time to a cause that I find to be a crucial element to foster/promote on Drexel’s campus. The initiative to encourage exercise and movement for the community is part of my values and goal in life. As I plan to become a physical therapist, I want to encourage the use of exercise as medicine.
    Benefit: From volunteering, I can provide input from the perspective of a student and personal experiences at Drexel. This allows initiatives to reach more students or be more convenient for them. I am also able to make connections with members of Drexel University that are a part of EIM-OC. I get the opportunity to hear their ideas/ thoughts to help reach our goals to unite the different elements of exercise and health on our campus.



    Anna Pohuly, Executive Assistant for the senior associate dean of Nursing & Student Affairs and chief academic nursing officer at Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions

    Anna Pohuly, Executive Assistant for the senior associate dean of Nursing & Student Affairs

    What: Pohuly started volunteering in Drexel’s vaccination clinic this year. She directs people to their appointments and keeps the waiting lines orderly. Prior to working in the clinic, she assisted students with making their appointments.
    Why: I enjoy helping people, and love seeing people happy. I have really missed human connection over the last year, so it was nice to see others.
    Benefit: Everyone is so happy and grateful to be there, and I was fortunate to be part of it.



    Drexel Academic Tower Updates

    01/14/21

    December 9, 2020

    When the announcement about a new home for the College of Nursing and Health Professions was made in May 2019, no one could have imagined that construction would be delayed by a global pandemic. It was expected that groundbreaking would be in spring 2020 with a substantial completion delivery of mid-2022. Beginning in late July, it is still the hope to maintain the same timeline.

    Google Earth screenshot of the location of the Drexel Academic Tower

    With CNHP being the first occupants of the new facility, some of the College of Medicine’s administrative functions, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Professional Studies and its first- and second-year medical program will join the College in phases. President Fry, in a message to the University in late 2019, said “at the new academic building, many of Drexel’s health-related programs will be under one roof, enhancing opportunities for interdisciplinary education in a facility that affords health sciences students, faculty and professional staff the best possible environment for continued development and growth.”

    Martin Luther King Jr. Day: A Day On, Not a Day Off

    01/15/21

    We will honor, on January 18, 2021, the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This holiday has been a national day of service—a “day on, not a day off”—to improve our communities for the past 26 years.

    We still feel the weight of how much more there is to be done even 52 years after Dr. King's death. Every day for CNHP is a “day on” because we are passionate about social justice and the minimizations of health disparities and health inequities. CNHP is committed to our students, alumni, faculty and professional staff and have long honored this day through service.

    Image with a photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and a quote: Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. Dr. King wrote about race relations in a way that was mutually beneficial, writing from the “Letter from Birmingham Jail;” In a real sense all life is inter-related. All men are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the inter-related structure of reality.

    His words are especially relevant today: “I have tried to make clear that it is wrong to use immoral means to attain moral ends. But now I must affirm that it is just as wrong, or even more so, to use moral means to preserve immoral ends. In summary there is never the wrong time to do the right thing and to grow from our mistakes."

    These tools, Six Steps for Nonviolent Social Change, shared by the King Center resonate with me deeply as a social change agent.

    1. Information gathering.
    2. Education.
    3. Personal commitment.
    4. Negotiation.
    5. Direct action.
    6. Reconciliation.

    These tenets are to be reflected in our mission within diversity, equity and inclusion, the course learning objectives and our actions as students, alumni, faculty, professional staff and partners. I must add for a point of reflection: Own your own stuff so that change can occur; I know I do!

    Appreciate you as social change agents,

    Veronica Carey, PhD
    Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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