Neal D. Goldstein, PhD

Neal D. Goldstein headshot
Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Goldstein’s work focuses on epidemiological analysis of infectious diseases that impact public health. He is actively studying the COVID-19 pandemic and the HIV epidemic, both at the neighborhood level as well as individual risk, especially among vulnerable populations. He also researches vaccination and vaccine-preventable diseases and healthcare associated infections. With his background in biomedical informatics he has expertise in electronic health record studies.

For news media inquiries, contact Greg Richter at gdr33@drexel.edu or 215.295.2614.

In The News

Parent’s Guide to COVID Vaccines for Kids Under 5: Q&A With Dr. Neal Goldstein
Neal Goldstein, PhD, an associate professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was quoted in a June 27 KYW Newsradio segment and "In Depth" podcast about what parents should consider about the COVID-19 vaccines that are now available for children six months to five years old.
Philly’s Return of Masks Gets Both Eyerolls and Support From Residents. Can Health Officials Bridge This Divide?
Neal Goldstein, PhD, an assistant research professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was quoted in an April 12 Philadelphia Inquirer article about mixed responses to the return of Philadelphia’s indoor mask mandate.
Philadelphia Is First U.S. Big City To Reimpose Indoor Mask Rules as COVID Rates Rise
Neal Goldstein, PhD, an assistant research professor, Jennifer Kolker, a clinical professor, and Thersa Sweet, PhD, an associate professor, all in the Dornsife School of Public Health, were quoted in an April 11 Philadelphia Inquirer article about Philadelphia reinstating indoor mask rules as the area experiences a rise in COVID cases. The article also ran April 11 in The Denver Gazette and The Wenatchee World (Wenatchee, Wisconsin).
COVID-19 Moves to a 'New Stage' in Pa. and N.J. as Cases and Hospitalizations Plummet
Neal D. Goldstein, PhD, an assistant research professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was quoted in a Feb. 26 Philadelphia Inquirer article about the current state of the pandemic in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
How a Children’s COVID Vaccine Could Offer a New Normal for Schools
Neal D. Goldstein, PhD, an assistant research professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was quoted in a Sept. 22 WHYY story about how a COVID-19 vaccine for children could offer a new normal for schools.
What To Expect if You Get a Breakthrough COVID-19 Infection
Neal D. Goldstein, PhD, an assistant research professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was quoted in a Sept. 22 Philadelphia Inquirer story about what to expect if you get a breakthrough COVID-19 infection.
Fully Vaxxed and Worried About Delta? Here’s What You Need To Know Now
Neal D. Goldstein, PhD, an assistant professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was quoted in an Aug. 27 Philadelphia magazine article about breakthrough infections and how to weigh the risks of vaxxed-only, mask-off environments.
What Will the End of the COVID Pandemic Look Like?
Neal D. Goldstein, PhD, an assistant professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was quoted in an April 26 WHYY segment about what the end of the pandemic will look like.

Related Articles

Baby with mother Infant Mortality in the U.S. Remains High; A New Drexel Study Shares How to Best Spend Money to Save Lives
Increasing state and local funding for environmental, educational and social services may lower infant mortality among those at highest risk, particularly among infants born to teenage mothers, according to findings published this week in the journal Pediatrics from researchers at Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health.
Vaccine legislation increase where outbreaks occured Disease Outbreaks Are Increasing. A Drexel Study Shows that Legislators are Taking Action
Vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) outbreaks are increasing in frequency in the United States, but this trend is also met with an uptick in legislation aimed at increasing childhood vaccination in places where those epidemics occurred, according to findings published today in JAMA Pediatrics from researchers at the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University.
Syringe with vaccine Public Health Campaigns Need Greater Emphasis on Complementary Role of Condoms and Vaccination to Prevent HPV among Gay Men
Public health efforts must emphasize condom use and vaccination together to reduce human papillomavirus (HPV) cases among young sexually active gay men, according to researchers at Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health published today in the journal Vaccine . The work builds on other studies demonstrating success of these methods by modeling how many HPV cases can be prevented by increasing the number of people vaccinated.
vaccine Many State Lawmakers Want to Loosen Childhood Vaccine Requirements, But Legal Barriers Persist
An analysis of proposed vaccine legislation between 2011 and 2017 shows that although the majority of proposed bills would have allowed more parents to exempt their children from school immunization requirements, those that favored vaccines were more likely to become law.
A baby laying in an incubator More Frequent Checks Control MRSA in Newborns, But Can Hospitals Afford Them?
Checking more often on newborns in the NICU provided positive results for preventing MRSA transmission, but hospitals must balance the high costs, a new study found.
PrEP pills The U.S. Could Easily Hit Its 2020 HIV Prevention Goal By Using One Drug, Drexel Study Finds
If just a quarter of high-risk men who have sex with men were to use daily preventive medicine, the United States could surpass its goal of reducing new HIV infections by 25 percent.
A newborn baby in the NICU Even Perfectly Clean Hands Can Lead To MRSA Transmission in NICU Babies
A new study led by Drexel University found that even if hospital workers follow handwashing guidelines as closely as possible, MRSA can still be transmitted among their newborn patients in the NICU.
A child playing with a toy at a daycare. More Day Cares Near By, More Germs? Maybe Not, According to Drexel Whooping Cough Study
A team of Drexel University researchers looking into how a higher density of day care facilities may affect the prevalence of illness in a neighborhood and found that it doesn’t really have much of an effect.