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Fall Courses



July 23, 2018

Learn about the social dynamics of urban spaces, the language of the body in popular culture, and the philosophies of social and political life in these exciting fall courses.

COMMUNICATION

Body Talk (COM T380.001)
This course will explore the way in which the body is framed in popular culture and health communication, including the language of gender, race, weight, age, ability and disability, and health and illness. We will begin with the mind/body “Cartesian” split in Western culture; the evaluation of “good” and “bad” bodies; and the language of morality such as “self-control.” Cultural differences in health care communication will also be considered. Assignments include interviews, analyses of popular media and individual research projects.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Barbara Hoekje, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:30 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD

COM in "Fake News" World (COM 400.001)
A firm understanding of health risks — from climate changes to vaccines, toxins and other pollutants — is essential to making basic life decisions. Studies show that most people learn about science and health from the media, and that the general public scores low in science literacy. The cloud of “fake news” and propaganda further obstructs understanding and informed decision-making. For those of us who are charged with communicating these topics to the public, knowing how to sift through these various agendas and present clear information can be a challenge. In this course, we will start with health communication and risk communication theories. We will then use specific case studies to look at the process of scientific obfuscation, and discuss pragmatic approaches to effective communication with the public about these issues.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Susan Stein, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD

PHILOSOPHY

Metaphysics: Philosophy of Reality (PHIL 211.130)
This class will discuss theories about the nature of reality and issues such as mind, the existence of God and free will.

This 3.0 credit hybrid course, taught by Patrick Denehy, PhD, is open to undergraduate students above the freshman level who have taken at least one 100-level PHIL class. It will meet Wednesdays from 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. Location TBD

Aristotle: Theoretical Philosophy (PHIL 212.001)
Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) organized knowledge into three great categories, the first of which was theoretical knowledge. In turn, theoretical knowledge addresses the knowledge of nature (physis), mathematics, and “First Philosophy.” Following an overview of key elements in Aristotle’s logic (from “The Organon”), we will read extended excerpts from the “Metaphysics,” the “Physics,” and “De Anima” (“On the Soul”).

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jacques Catudal, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Mondays and Wednesdays from 12:30 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD

Social & Political Philosophy (PHIL 241.001)
This class will study theories about human social and political life that bear on philosophical issues, such as the nature and scope of justice, the legitimacy of states, and the relationship between democracy, civil rights and civil disobedience.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Carol Mele, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2 – 3:20 p.m. Location TBD

Introduction to Jewish Philosophy (PHIL T280.001)
The history of Jewish philosophy is almost as long as the history of philosophy itself. This course will provide an introduction to major thinkers in the history of Jewish philosophy through close reading and discussion of primary texts. It is organized around three distinct time periods: the Medieval world (Halevi and Maimonides), the modern Enlightenment (Spinoza and Mendelssohn), and the 20th century (Buber and Levinas). We will focus on the relation of religion and reason, as well as the relation of religion and ethics. We will also look at the way these thinkers make use of the same conceptual frameworks – Medieval Neoplatonism; Enlightenment natural religion and social contract theory; and postmodernism – as their non-Jewish contemporaries, yet modify these frameworks to accommodate their Judaism.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by David Seltzer, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:30 – 1:50 p.m.

Plato’s “Republic” (PHIL 481.001)
This course will look at the most famous work of Western philosophy: Plato's “Republic.” The course will examine the arguments in the work, as well as the significance of its dialogue form. Finally, we address the main point of “Republic” and consider secondary sources.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Marilyn Foley, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students who have taken at least two 200-level PHIL classes. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:40 – 4:50 p.m.

SOCIOLOGY

Urban Sociology (SOC 240.001)
Urban sociology examines the social dynamics of cities and suburbs. This course situates urban problems and residents’ experiences within the historical movements of people and capital that have led to the growth and decline of cities and suburbs. Throughout the course, we will use a sociological lens to analyze the ways in which structural factors shape individual experiences, and vice versa.

This 4.0 credit course, taught by Jason Orne, PhD, is open to undergraduate students above the freshman level. The class will meet Mondays and Wednesdays from 2 – 3:50 p.m. Location TBD

Environmental Justice (SOC 346.001)
Environmental justice issues occur at the intersection of human health, the environment and human rights. This course focuses on inequalities in the distribution of pollution, waste, risk and hazard, as well as the spatial, political, legal, regulatory and scientific issues that surround cases of environmental injustice. Such cases often involve racial, ethnic and social class inequalities in environmental safety, health and beauty. They also involve the environmental justice movement and its interactions with environmental regulators, scientists and the media. Environmental inequalities are international in scope, and also encompass unequal vulnerability to disaster.

This 4.0 credit course, taught by Diane Sicotte, PhD, is open to undergraduate students. The class will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:00 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD