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Master of Arts in Art Therapy and Counseling

Program

The Art Therapy and Counseling graduate program equips students with the skills and knowledge to apply the theory of art therapy in various treatment situations. Working with specified treatment objectives, students learn to combine art therapy theory and practice with psychodynamic and psychotherapeutic technique. They can work with individuals and/or groups using the theoretical and clinical education they have received. This integrated approach provides a comprehensive foundation for sound clinical work with many different clinical and culturally diverse populations.

This distinctive program was founded in 1967 at Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital; it was the first continually operating program in the world to offer graduate-level art therapy education. Committed to progress within the field of art therapy and counseling, the program provides students with extensive exposure to current psychological, developmental, psychotherapy, and art therapy theory and practice.

The Art Therapy and Counseling program's 90-quarter-credit curriculum is designed to meet the Pennsylvania Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) educational requirements. Be advised, however, that licensure requirements vary widely from state to state, and may change at any time. Therefore, if you are or will be interested in counseling licensure in the future, you are strongly advised to access and check the requirements for any state(s) in which you plan to work and practice. It is the students' responsibility to know and understand the requirements for any type of future licensure.

What you'll learn

Through a dynamic and multi-dimensional learning process, students of the Art Therapy and Counseling program develop a clear understanding of the significant role that imagination and empathy for the patient plays in art therapy. The students also learn about themselves and the role that their cognitive and emotional reactions play in the relationship between themselves, as art therapists, and the patient/client.

The Art Therapy curriculum is a synthesis of multiple dynamic and interactive educational components including theory, practice/clinical, intersubjective experience, clinical supervision, and research. Together, these interactive components provide a foundation for the development of an understanding of the complex interaction that occurs in the art therapy process between the therapist, the patient/client, and the art process. 

Key program components include:

  • Advanced education in the theoretical and clinical foundations of art psychotherapy;
  • Multiple supervised clinical placement opportunities with a range of populations in a variety of settings, such as medical and psychiatric hospitals, inpatient and outpatient behavioral health facilities, schools, continuing care facilities, community health centers, correctional facilities and more;
  • Emphasis upon the study of emergent art making within the context of the therapeutic relationship;
  • Integration with students of other creative arts therapies while helping each student develop a strong identity as an art therapist;
  • Master’s thesis research or capstone project guided by a chosen multidisciplinary committee;
  • Experiential art making processes integrated with theoretical, clinical and self-exploratory learning.

What makes the Drexel Art Therapy and Counseling program unique?

  • This groundbreaking program was the first of its kind.
  • Students combine art theory with real-life clinical fieldwork.
You are part of the Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions with access to various practice environments, the arts studio and educational facilities.

COMPLIANCE

The College of Nursing and Health Professions has a compliance process that may be required for every student. Some of these steps may take significant time to complete. Please plan accordingly.

Visit the Compliance pages for more information.

Admission Requirements

Background checks:

As a student of the College of Nursing and Health Professions you will be required to satisfactorily complete a criminal background check, child and elder abuse checks, drug test, immunizations, physical exams, health history, and/or other types of screening before being permitted to begin clinical training.

You will not need to submit documentation of these requirements as part of your application to the master’s program. Failure to fully satisfy these requirements as directed upon enrollment may prevent assignment to a clinical site for training.  A background check that reflects a conviction of a felony or misdemeanor may affect your ability to be placed in certain facilities, and later, to become board certified and licensed.

Deadline:

Priority deadline: completed applications due December 15. Regular deadline: completed applications due January 15.

Degree:
Bachelors of Science or Bachelors of Arts from program fully accredited institution and a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 or above on all previous coursework.

Standardized Tests:
N/A

Transcripts:

  • Official transcripts must be sent directly to Drexel from all the colleges/universities that you have attended. Transcripts must be submitted in a sealed envelope with the college/university seal over the flap. Please note that transcripts are required regardless of number of credits taken or if the credits were transferred to another school. An admission decision may be delayed if you do not send transcripts from all colleges/universities attended.
  • Transcripts must show course-by-course grades and degree conferrals. If your school does not notate degree conferrals on the official transcripts, you must provide copies of any graduate or degree certificates.
  • If your school issues only one transcript for life, you are required to have a course-by-course evaluation completed by an approved transcript evaluation agency
  • Use our Transcript Lookup Tool to assist you in contacting your previous institutions

Prerequisites:
18 credits in studio art courses demonstrating range of media; 12 credits in psychology, including mandatory courses in developmental psychology and abnormal psychology. Behavioral research methods course recommended.

References:
Three letters of recommendation required. At least two recommendations should be from current or former academic instructors. Letters of recommendation should be requested and submitted electronically through your online application.

    Personal Statement/ Essay:
     A 300-750 word typed essay. Considered an autobiography, this essay is intended to serve as a writing sample while telling us more about you.

    Interview/Portfolio:
    Art portfolio:
    Submit a portfolio of 10-15 works of art that demonstrates facility with a range of media and personal understanding of creative process. Must include image descriptions documenting title, media, dimensions and year. Submit through drexelgraduate.slideroom.com.


    Interview: Select applicants will be invited to attend a required, in-person, group interview. International applicants will be contacted individually to arrange for a video or telephone interview. Due to the number of applications received, we are not able to schedule an interview with every applicant.

    CV/Resume:
    Required. Include relevant education, work and service/volunteer experience.

    Additional Requirements for International Applicants

    • Transcript Evaluation: All international students applying to a graduate program must have their transcripts evaluated by the approved agency: World Education Services (WES), 212.966.6311, Bowling Green Station, P.O. Box 5087, New York, NY 10274-5087, Web site: www.wes.org/.
    • TOEFL: Applicants who have not received a degree in the United States are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). An official score report must be sent directly from the Educational Testing Service. For more information visit the Web site: www.ets.org, then click on TOEFL.
    • I-20/DS-2019 and Supporting Financial Documents (international students only): Please print, complete, and submit the I-20/DS-2019 Application Form (PDF). 

    International Consultants of Delaware, Inc.
    P.O. Box 8629
    Philadelphia, PA 19101-8629
    215.222.8454, ext. 603

    Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools
    3600 Market St., Suite 400
    Philadelphia, PA 19104-2651
    215.349.8767

    World Education Services, Inc. (WES)
    Bowling Green Station, P.O. Box 5087
    New York, NY 10274-5087
    212.966.6311

    Tuition and Fee Rates
    Please visit the Tuition and Fee Rates page on Drexel Central

    Application Link (if outside organization):
    N/A

    Curriculum

    Thesis

    Students complete a master’s thesis as part of the requirements for graduation. The thesis project stresses the development of research skills and an understanding of the current literature in art therapy. Students may choose to conduct either a research thesis or a capstone thesis. Each student selects a topic with guidance from his or her thesis advisor beginning in the summer following completion of first year courses. The thesis is an independent study project and the time to complete it is variable. Graduating students present their completed thesis to the professional art therapy community, peers, family and friends at the annual spring research colloquium held at the end of their second academic year.

    Accreditation

    AATA: Approved by the American Art Therapy Association. www.arttherapy.org/

    Clinical Practices

    The students learn how to apply the theory of art therapy in various treatment situations. Working with specified treatment objectives, students learn to combine art therapy theory and practice with psychodynamic and psychotherapeutic technique. They can work with individuals, groups or families using the theoretical and clinical education they have received. This integrated approach provides a comprehensive foundation of sound clinical work in different treatment settings and with different clinical populations.

    The Art Therapy program offers 1200 clinical art therapy educational hours. The number of clinical practicum and internship hours offered by the program meets the educational standards of the American Art Therapy Association and exceed the hours required in most art therapy graduate programs. Students begin their clinical experience as soon as they enter the program. The clinical education parallels the classroom education and is enhanced by 3 to 3.5 hours of individual and group supervision per week. As part of the clinical and supervisory experience, students receive a visual/verbal log in which to record their clinical experiences in words and artwork. They use these logs in their supervision in order to better articulate and understand the complex dimensions of the art therapy process.

    First-year students have three clinical practicum experiences, one in each quarter. The first quarter clinical practicum is accompanied by an intensive course on Professional Orientation and Ethics I. The first practicum experience is one in which the art of clinical art therapy observation is taught through practical experience, role modeling, and art therapy supervision. The second practicum emphasizes a gradual increase in active participation in art therapy sessions while integrating their learned observational skills. This occurs with the guidance of the on-site art therapy supervisor. The degree of involvement in the art therapy process increases concomitant to the student’s skill development which is discussed in various clinical supervision venues, and evaluated through the clinical evaluation process. The third quarter is a continuation of practicing art therapy under the guidance of an art therapist wherein observation skills and art therapy skills begin to mature. In order to provide a range of clinical art therapy experience, the student spends the first two quarters at one clinical site and the third quarter at a different clinical site. Consequently, the student experiences two different treatment settings, two different human service provider systems with different organizational dynamics, and two different clinical populations. These clinical practicum experiences are assigned by the Clinical Coordinator, and require that an art therapist be on site with the student during the first year. The on-site art therapist serves as a role model for the first-year student to observe.

    The second-year internship offers an opportunity for students to mature and specialize as clinical interns. With the guidance of the Clinical Coordinator and the clinical guidelines and requirements students can choose their own clinical site which need not have an art therapist on site. This internship lasts the entire academic year and gives the student the experience of being part of a treatment team. Often when students choose an internship site where there is not a pre-existing art therapy service, they receive first hand experience of developing this service, with administrative and clinical supervision. The result of this experience often is the creation of job. A large percentage of the students are offered jobs at the conclusion of their internship in sites where they have created the service. Students receive off-site supervision by a registered art therapist as well as two group small supervisions on campus.

    News & Events

     

    08/03/17

    Faculty Accolades

    Stella Lucia Volpe, PhD, professor and chair of the Nutrition Sciences department, received the Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutritionists’ Distinguished Scholar Award, March, 2017
     
    A CNHP clinical professor was among the recipients of a Provost Award for Outstanding Scholarly Productivity. Denise Wolf, MA, ATR-BC, LPC received the Adjunct Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence at this year’s Provost's Awards for Teaching, Scholarship and Professional Service.
     
    Theresa Fay-Hillier, DrPH, an assistant clinical professor in undergraduate nursing, received an International Travel Award from Drexel to present at the XXXVth International Congress on Law and Mental Health in Prague this July. Her peer reviewed presentation was titled: "Intimate Partner Violence Screening Practices by Registered Nurses in the Emergency Department." 
     
    Assistant clinical professor of graduate nursing Susan Solecki, DrPH(c) received an International Travel Award from Drexel to present at the conference.  Susan's peer review presentation was titled: "Policy and Practice Implications of Electronic Aggression in the Pediatric Population." The sessions included presenters from the United States, Canada, and Australia.
     
    Yasmine Awais, MAAT, ATR-BC, an assistant clinical professor in creative arts therapies, received a 2017 Drexel University, Teaching and Learning Conference Travel Award.
     
    The Department of Creative Arts Therapies adjunct faculty Denise Wolf, MCPHU ’99, MA received a 2017 Conference Travel Award, Drexel University. She also received the Drexel Provost’s Adjunct Teaching Excellence Award, May, 2017
     
    Abby Dougherty, PhD, assistant clinical professor in creative arts therapies, received an American Counseling Association award to attend the ACA Institute on Leadership Training in July 2017.
     
    Joke Bradt, PhD, MT-BC received the CNHP Teaching Excellence Award for classroom teaching in May 2017.
     
    Joanne Loewy, DA, LCAT, MT-BC, adjunct faculty in creative arts therapies, received the World Federation of Music Therapy Clinical Impact Award at the World Congress of Music Therapy in Tsukuba, Japan, July 4-8, 2017.
     
    Michael Bruneau Jr, PhD, health sciences assistant teaching professor, was named the marketing chair of the Clinical Exercise Physiology Association and to the membership committee of the American College of Sports Medicine.
     
    Vincent Zarro, MD received the Sir William Osler Award for distinguished service to medicine and education DUCOM Internal Medicine Residency Program in June 15, 2017.
     
    Health Sciences’ William D’Andrea, MS, clinical professor, Michael Kirifides, PhD, assistant professor, Margery Lockard, PT, PhD, clinical professor, Robert Mele, DPM, assistant professor, Janell Mensinger, PhD, associate teaching professor and Sinclair Smith, ScD, teaching professor and department chair  were inducted into Alpha Eta.
     
    Assistant Clinical Professor Krista Rompolski, PhD received a fellowship: Gross Anatomy and Dissection Completed Limbs, Head, and Neck Modules Anatomical Society's Anatomy Training Program at University of Oxford, UK.
     

    Keynote Presentations

    Virginia R. Lemon, Jody Herman, Emily N. Werner, Jacqui Van Grouw, Rachel C. Kelley, Francesco Alessio, Michael Bruneau Jr, PhD, health sciences assistant teaching professor and Stella Lucia Volpe, PhD, professor and chair of the Nutrition Sciences department, presented “Validity of Self-Reported Energy Intake Compared to Resting Metabolic Rate in Athletes” at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in Denver, CO in June 2017.
     
    Michael L. Bruneau Jr., health sciences assistant teaching professor, Susan Sotir, Richard J. Wood, Samuel A.E. Headley, Elizabeth O’Neill, Susan E. Lachowski and Vincent J. Paolone presented “Influence of Aerobic Exercise on Ghrelin-o-Acyltransferase in Normal Weight and Obese Adults: A Pilot Study” at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in Denver, CO in June 2017.
     
    Ritanne Duszak, Jody L. Herman, Emily N. Werner, Jacqui Van Grouw, Rachel C. Kelley, Francesco Alessio, Michael L. Bruneau, Jr. PhD, health sciences assistant teaching professor and Stella Lucia Volpe, PhD, professor and chair of the Nutrition Sciences department, presented “Evaluation of Nutrient Intakes of Masters Athletes” at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in Denver, CO in June 2017.
     
    Anneliese M. Kuemmerle, Jody L. Herman, Emily N. Werner, Jacqui Van Grouw, Rachel C. Kelley, Francesco Alessio, Michael L. Bruneau, PhD, health sciences assistant teaching professor, and Stella L. Volpe, PhD, professor and chair of the Nutrition Sciences department, presented “Exploring the Relationship between Soluble Fiber Intake and Bone Mineral Density in Athletes” at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in Denver, CO in June 2017.
     
    Nutrition sciences Clinical Professor Joseph Boullata, PharmD, FACN was an invited speaker Asociacion Colombiana de Nutricion Clinica, 31st Annual Clinical Congress, Bogotá, Colombia. He gave the following presentations: “How Malnutrition Affects the Therapeutic Response to Medication,” “Safe Practice Recommendations for Enteral Nutrition Therapy” and “Safety Recommendations: Enteral Drug Administration.
     
    Girija Kaimal,EdD, an assistant professor in the Creative Arts Therapies department, presented on Research in Art Therapy, New York University.
     
    Christen J. Mendonca, Jillian L. Hawkins, Sinclair A. Smith, ScD, health sciences teaching professor and department chair presented “Validity And Reliability Of A Low-cost System To Measure Oxygen Uptake During Submaximal Exercise” at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in Denver, CO in June 2017.
     
    Manal A. Naseeb, Sinclair A. Smith, ScD, health sciences teaching professor and department chair, Emily N. Werner, Jacqui Van Grouw, Rachel C. Kelley, Francesco Alessio, Stella L. Volpe, PhD, professor and chair of the Nutrition Sciences department presented “Age Related Decline in VO2max and Lean Body Mass in Masters Athletes” at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in Denver, CO in June 2017. 
     
    Professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition Sciences, Stella Lucia Volpe, PhD presented “My Path to My Career” at the American College of Sports Medicine Student Affairs Committee, Pre-Conference, Meeting in Denver, CO in June 2017.
     
     

    Sponsored Research

    Margaret Finley, PT, PhD, physical therapy and rehabilitation sciences associate professor, and collaborators have been awarded a $662,720 grant for a Spinal Cord Injury Research Project by the Department of Defense. The three-year project, “Development of a Biopsychosocial Prospective Surveillance Model of Shoulder Pain in Individual’s with Spinal Cord Injury,” will investigate presentation and progression of musculoskeletal pain and psychosocial impairments the first year following spinal cord injury beginning with inpatient rehabilitation in the acute phase. The overall goal is to develop a biopsychosocial Prospective Surveillance Model to provide a proactive approach for early identification and intervention programs to ameliorate the debilitating consequences of activity limitations and participation restrictions in individuals with spinal cord injury, reducing burden to military service members, veterans, their families and caregivers. Co-investigators are CNHP’s David Ebaugh, PT, PhD, physical therapy and rehabilitation sciences clinical professor; Edward Gracely, PhD, associate professor in the College of Medicine and Dornsife School of Public Health; and Thomas Trojian, MD, professor, in the College of Medicine. The multisite project will be conducted in collaboration with Magee Rehabilitation Hospital and the University of Maryland Rehabilitation and Orthopedic Institute.
     
    Kymberlee Montgomery, DrNP, CRNP-BC, CNE, FAANP, CNHP associate clinical professor and department chair, and Dennis H. Novack, MD, CoM, are the principal investigators of a project that Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation approved a Board grant of up to $420,094 for a three-year period effective July 1, 2017 to Drexel University to support a project titled, “A Multi-Institution Effort to Advance Professionalism and Interprofessional Education with ProfessionalFormation.org.” This project proposes to enhance ProfessionalFormation.org (PFO) so that it can be used effectively in interprofessional education, for the assessment of development of professionalism and interprofessional competencies by learners in multiple professions and for remediation. Thirteen institutions have agreed to work with Novak and Montgomery to enhance and expand their education in professionalism and interprofessional care and to pilot and evaluate the use of PFO in at least two professions per institution. If successful, PFO should become an important, tested resource for widespread use in health professional schools as part of their individual and interprofessional curricula.
     

    Civic Engagement

    On July 10, 2017, Kate Mitchell, PT, DPT, NCS, associate clinical professor and assistant director of clinical education in the physical therapy and rehabilitation sciences department provided a 4-hour training course to Magee Physical and Occupational Therapists on Balance-based Torso Weighting®. This newer technique involves the use of targeted sensory weighting throughout the trunk to assist individuals with balance problems stand and move better. Mitchell is a certified BalanceWear practitioner and as part of the Drexel Faculty Practice has fit over 90 individuals with this new garment. Please check out www.Motiontherapeutics.com for more information on this exciting treatment modality that allows patients to move more safely and confidently.
     

    Publications

    Prevalence and potential factors associated with overweight and obesity status in adults with intellectual developmental disorders. 
    Ranjan S, Nasser JA, Fisher K., Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 2017 May 24. doi: 10.1111/jar.12370. [Epub ahead of print] Review
     
    Shuggi, I. A., Oh, H., Shewokis, P.A., & Gentili, R.J. (in press). Mental workload and motor performance dynamics during practice of reaching movements under various levels of task difficulty. Neuroscience. [IF: 3.277].
     
    Liu, Y., Ayaz, H. & Shewokis, P.A. (in press) Multisubject “learning” for mental workload classification using concurrent EEG, fNIRS, and Physiological measures. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience,  [IF: 3.634]
     
    Aiello, L., & Chiatti, B. (2017).  Primer in genetics and genomics, article 4 – Inheritance patterns. Biological Research for Nursing. Advance online publication. doi: 
     
    Chiatti, B. D. (2017). [Update] Chapter: Ethiopians. In Cultural Perspectives Content Set. Lippincott Advisor Nursing Online Reference Database. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
     
    Aiello-Laws, L. (2016). Clinical research. In Gobel, B.H., Triest-Robertson, S., & Vogel, W.H. (Eds.) Advanced oncology nursing certification review and resource manual (2nd ed.). Pittsburgh, PA:  ONS Publishing.
     
    Christensen ML, Ayers P, Boullata, JI, et al.  A lipid injectable emulsion survey with gap analysis. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. (in press).  
     
    Ayers P, Boullata, JI, Guenter P, Holcombe B. Lipid injectable emulsions: infusion confusion. The Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN) . 2017  
     
    Guenter, P, Ayers P, Boullata, JI, et al. Parenteral nutrition errors and potential errors reported over the past 10 years. Nutrition in Clinical Practice
     2017;32
     
    Petroka, K, Campbell-Bussiere, R, Dychtwald, DK, Milliron, PhD, B-J. Barriers and facilitators to healthy eating and disease self-management among older adults residing in subsidized housing. Journal of Nutrition and Health. 2017; [Epub ahead of print].
     
    Gambescia, S. F. (2017). Get our children off the gridiron: Part one. Delta Epsilon Sigma Journal, LXII (1), 33-36. 
     
    Schwartz, J., Gambescia, S. F. & Patton, C. (2017). Impetus and creation of an Accelerated, Second-degree Baccalaureate Nursing program readmission policy. Sage Open Nursing, 3, 1-6. 
     
    Gambescia, S. F. (20 June 2017). Cut down on plastic bags. [letter]. The Philadelphia Inquirer, A15. 
     
    Gambescia, S. F. (2017). Health Education Specialists and the interprofessional education movement. Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 3, 75-76.
     
    Bruneau Jr., M., Angelopoulos, T., Gordon, P., Moyna, N., Visich, P., Zoeller, R., Seip, R., Bilbie, S., Thompson, P., Devaney, J., Gordish-Dressman, H., Hoffman, E., Pescatello, L. (2016). The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Associates with Habitual Physical Activity among European-American Adults. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine
     
    Diamond, G., Herres, J, Krauthamer Ewing, E.S., Atte, T., Scott, S., Wintersteen, M., & Gallop, R. (2017). Comprehensive screening for suicide risk in primary care.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 53(1): 48 - 54. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.02.020.
     
    Wenger, S., Drott, J., Fillipo, R., Findlay, A., Genung, A., & Bradt, J. (under review). Reducing opioid use for patients with chronic pain: An evidence based perspective. Physical Therapy.
     
    Shim, M., Johnson, B., Bradt, J., & Gasson, S. (under review). Using mixed methods grounded theory to generate and test a theoretical model of dance/movement therapy for pain resilience. Journal of Mixed Methods Research.
     
    Hohmann, L., Bradt, J., Stegemann, T., & Koelsch, S. (under review). Effects of Music Therapy and Music-Based Interventions in the Treatment of Substance Use Disorders: A Systematic Review. PLOS ONE
     
    Bradt, J. (2017). Threats to legitimacy? [editorial]. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 26(4), 291–292. 
     
    Gerber, N., & Myers-Coffman, K. (In press). Translation in arts-based research.  In P. Leavy (Ed.). The handbook of arts-based research. New York: NY:  Guilford Press. 
     
    Haddock, L., Dougherty, A., & Calley, T. (2017). Non-nuclear families. In B. Flamez (Ed.), Introduction to marriage, couple, and family counseling: Applied practice. New York, New York: Sage.
     
    Goodill, S. (2017) Movement, Metaphor, and Money, American Journal of Dance Therapy, 39, (1), 6-18. DOI: 10.1007/s10465-017-9244-6 
     
    Schelly, Hill, E. (2017) Marian Chace Foundation Lecture: Introduction of Dr. Sharon W. Goodill. American Journal of Dance Therapy, 39, (1), 3-5.
     
    Jones, J.P., Walker, M.S., Drass, J.M., & Kaimal, G. (in press). Art Therapy Interventions for Active Duty Military Service Members with PTS AND TBI. The International Journal of Art Therapy
     
    Kaimal, G., Mensinger, J.L., Drass, J.M., &, Dieterich-Hartwell, R. (in press). Open studio art therapy versus Coloring: Differences in outcomes of affect, stress, creative agency and self–efficacy. Canadian Art Therapy Association Journal
     
    Kaimal, G, Metzl, E., &, Millrod, E.T.* (in press). Facilitative Leadership: A framework for the creative arts therapies. Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association
     
    Kaimal, G., Ayaz, H. Herres, J.M., Makwana, B.*, Dieterich-Hartwell, R.M.*, Kaiser, D.H., & Nasser, J.A. (2017). fNIRS assessment of reward perception based on visual self-expression: Coloring, doodling and free drawing. The Arts in Psychotherapy. 55, 85-92.
     
    Melchiorri G, Viero V, Sorge R, Triossi T, Campagna A, Volpe SL, Lecis D, Tancredi V, Andreoli A. Body composition analysis to study long-term training effects in elite male water polo athletes. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness. 2017 June 21 [Epub ahead of print]
     
    Naseeb NA, Volpe SL. Protein and exercise in the prevention of sarcopenia and aging. Nutrition Research. 40:1-20, 2017
     
    Volpe SL. The gut microbiota and exercise performance. ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal. 21(3):34-36. 2017
     

    07/05/17

     
    Producing a commencement ceremony honoring all our graduates is a huge undertaking, months in the making and includes many, many volunteers, but it pales in comparison to the work the College of Nursing and Health Professions graduates did to earn their seat at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts on June 12, 2017. Drexel University Provost Brian Blake, PhD welcomed our graduates and all who taught, nurtured and supported them along the way including their family and friends who made up their greatest support network. He commented about CNHP graduates having a higher level of capacity for knowledge, innovation and most importantly, for service to others. That theme, so deeply embedded in the curriculum of all the programs in the College, was highlighted in the speeches given by student speaker Kimberly Allen and Sueann Navarez-Brown and David Baiada, who delivered the commencement address.
     
    Allen stated how humbling it is to be part of a person’s most difficult and vulnerable moments and how important it is to empower patients or clients to make the choices that matter the most to them. “Drexel’s programs have educated us to promote social justice and healthcare equality as we serve our clients in the various wellness/health pathways,” she articulated. She acknowledged that it is necessary to be skilled to be able to perform, but that it is far more important to choose to be present in each and every moment while with clients, to choose to be in service of others. 
     
    Navarez-Brown, in her speech, noted that both faculty and classmates assisted each other in becoming the best they each could be by providing outstanding support and encouragement. However, sometimes it did require a gentle and loving push. Benefitting from the confidence professors and fellow students had in each other, she concluded that they are skilled and determined, able to learn from failure and equipped with a sense of service and success.
     
    Nowhere is service to others better explained than in the keynote speech delivered by David Baiada. Baiada is the incoming CEO of BAYADA Home HealthCare, a company that brings vital services into homes across 23 states, India, Germany, South Korea and Ireland. Their staff of 50,000 nurses, home health aides, therapists, medical social workers and other healthcare professionals live the mission, vision and beliefs — the BAYADA Way — while caring for their patients. They put their clients first. They value their employees and they believe in building relationships based on trust, compassion, honesty and service. Baiada told a story of a client he called Mr. Jones who he visited in his West Philadelphia apartment.
     
    Mr. Jones is an elderly man who, because of cerebral palsy, relies on his electric wheelchair as his lifeline to the outside world. When Baiada arrived for a visit, Mr. Jones took a while to answer the door as his wheelchair was inoperable and he was forced to drag himself with the use of his walker. Baiada carried him back into his apartment and helped him get situated all the while Mr. Jones, clearly agitated, ranted about his frustration. In order for him to safely stay independent and in his home, he uses BAYADA for his Medicaid-funded home health services. When his aide Mary arrived, who is completely in tune with his needs and anxieties, Mr. Jones was finally able to calm down. Mr. Jones is someone who represents so many of the BAYADA clients who struggle day-to-day living because of disease or illness and Mary represents the thousands of people who bring their clients comfort and compassion and facilitate a better quality of life for them.
     
    The collaboration and coordination of care people have come to expect from BAYADA is most successfully achieved through interprofessional work. And Baiada noted that that kind of practice is purposely taught and demonstrated at CNHP because it is what is needed when dedicated to serving others. He learned many lessons over his career at kitchen tables in apartments like Mr. Jones’, but Baiada chose three to share with graduates.
    1. Listen closely, show empathy and respond to the needs of others. Helping others starts with a willingness to listen, connect, and tune in.  Your perception of their goals and needs might be biased or distorted by your own preferences, Making the most meaningful impact is dependent on your willingness to take the time to sit at the proverbial kitchen table and listen. 
    2. Set specific goals and work hard and efficiently to achieve them.There is no more powerful force than a clear goal.  You all are here because you set a goal to get your degree, and now as you look ahead, what will your next goal be?  I challenge you to think big, write it down, think about it often.  You’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish once you put it out there. 
    3. Be creative, flexible and determined. Reaching your goals will not come easy.  Like the patients and clients we care for, ups and downs are inevitable.  But I always find that those that are willing to think differently, adapt to change with an unrelenting determination will inevitably overcome almost any obstacle. 
    Compassion, excellence and reliability are elements of The BAYADA Way and they are also what so many have learned as students in the College of Nursing and Health Professions.

    Provost Blake, before introducing Susan Smith, PhD, interim dean, affirmed that the world needs those who received their diplomas that day citing that the long-term health and prosperity as a society depends on how graduates use their education.

    Smith thanked graduates for the privilege of learning from them, mentoring them and working alongside them for as long as they had been at Drexel. She acknowledged University administrators and Stephen Sheller, a prominent Philadelphia attorney and Drexel University trustee. Smith thanked both Sheller and his wife Sandra, a creative arts therapies and couple and family therapy alumna, for their support of the College and the Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services of Drexel University before presenting him with a gift for his service as a trustee.
     
    Honoring accomplishment and excellence continued as exceptional academic achievement was recognized. Students designated Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude and Summa Cum Laude, as well as Pennoni Honors College students and the recipient of the Harold W. Pote “Behind Every Graduate” Award where acknowledged before the specific award winners were announced.
     
    • Harold W. Pote “Behind Every Graduate” Award – Donald Little of Pennsbury High School
    • College-level Outstanding Promise Award – Kendra Ray, PhD (Creative Arts Therapies) and Anniliese Marie Kummerle, MS in Human Nutrition
    • Teaching Assistant Excellence Award and Outstanding Civic Engagement – Leah Tsui, MS in Human Nutrition and Jessica Liu, MS in Human Nutrition
    • Outstanding Civic Engagement – Corinne L. Ellis, MS in Human Nutrition
    • Dean’s Award – Anne E. Woolley, BSN
    • Achievement Award – John Ghee, MHS
    • Community Service Award – Kevin Carrasquillo, BS in Nutrition and Foods
    • Clinical Service Award – Nahidah R. Rahman, BS in Health Sciences
    • Social Justice Research Award – Mariya Kesselman, MA in Art Therapy and Counseling
     
    Graduates names were announced by Yasmine Awais, Beth Leonberg, Virginia Wilson, and Drs. Theresa Campo, Nancy Gerber, Stella Lucia Volpe and Linda Wilson with Dr. Michael Bruneau and Lauren Karch assisted with distribution of the scrolls.
     
    Doctoral graduates earning degrees in Couple and Family Therapy, Creative Arts Therapies, Nursing, Health Science in Rehabilitation Sciences, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences were hooded by their supervising professors first. Then graduates earning Master of Arts in Art Therapy and Counseling, Master of Arts in Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling, Master of Arts in Music Therapy and Counseling, Master of Family Therapy, Master of Health Administration, Master of Health Science (Physician Assistant), Master of Science in Human Nutrition and Master of Science in Nursing (Advance Practice and Nurse Practitioner) were escorted to the stage. They were followed by the graduates who earned Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Counseling, Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences, Bachelor of Science in Health Services Administration, Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foods. Once all graduated has been announced, an alumna for the classes of `90, `92 and `99 greeted the newest alumni — a long-standing tradition – to the more than 25,000 CNHP alumni.
     
    To conclude a week of celebrations, CNHP participated in the University-wide commencement ceremony at Citizens Bank Park in the evening of June 13. All schools and colleges had the opportunity to hear the inspiring words of John Maeda — the global head of Computational Design and Inclusion at Automattic, the parent company of Jetpack, WooCommerce, Longreads, WordPress.com and more. The night was capped off by a exciting display of fireworks sending Drexel’s newest alumni out in to the world to leave their marks for the betterment of society.
     
     

    06/03/17

    Revisiting our mission — To impact health and wellness through basic and translational scholarly works created by interprofessional teams investigating complex healthcare issues — we see that the service these men and women have given to Drexel, to the College of Nursing and Health Professions and to our students directly contributed to achieving that goal daily. 
     
    We thank these individuals for sharing their talent, intellect and energy toward changing the way we delivery healthcare — with compassion and precision and with the expertise of all our faculty and staff behind it.
     
    52 Years of Service
    Vincent Zarro, MD, PhD
    Associate Professor, Chinatown Clinic and Dornsife Center Wellness HUB
     
    41 Years of Service
    David Flood, PhD, BA
    Professor, Health Services Administration
     
    40 Years of Service
    R. Peter Meyer, PhD, BS
    Associate Professor, Health Sciences
     
    39 Years of Service
    Alan Haroian, PhD, BA
    Associate Professor, Health Sciences

    36 Years of Service
    Michael C. Kennedy, PhD, MS, BA
    Professor and Associate Dean, Undergraduate Health Professions

    32 Years of Service
    Geraldine Buck, DrPH, MHS, PA-C, DFAAPA
    Associate Teaching Professor and Director, Physician Assistant Post-Professional Master's Program Physician Assistant
     
    29 Years of Service
    Rita O'Donnell
    Program Coordinator, Health Sciences
     
    Gloria Turchi
    Administrative Assistant, Dean's Office
     
    Ronald Comer, DSW, MA, BA
    Associate Professor and Associate Director, Behavioral Health Counseling
     
    Janet Stern
    Academic Assistant Director, Physician Assistant
     
    24 Years of Service
    Ellen Schelly Hill, MMT, BC-DMT, NCC, LPC
    Associate Clinical Professor and Director, Dance/Movement Therapy & Counseling, Creative Arts Therapies

    26 Years of Service
    Margo Orlin, PT, PhD
    Associate Professor, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences
     
    21 Years of Service
    Gloria Donnelly, PhD, RN, FAAN, FCPP
    Professor and Dean Emerita
     
    Priscilla Killian, MSN, RN, CPNP
    Assistant Clinical Professor
     
    Patricia Gerrity, PhD, RN, FAAN
    Professor and Associate Dean for Community Programs
    Founder and Director, Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services of Drexel University
     
    20 Years of Service
    Elizabeth Gonzalez, PhD, PMHCNS-BC
    Associate Professor and Department Chair of Doctoral Nursing Program
     
    Patricia Rubertone, PT, MSW, EdD
    Assistant Clinical Professor and Director of Experiential Learning, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences

    17 Years of Service
    Diane Lewis
    Administrative Coordinator, Physician Assistant

    13 Years of Service
    Cheryl Portwood, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, CNE
    Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Graduate Nursing Advanced Role MSN Department
     
    Susan Smith, PT, PhD
    Interim Dean
     
    12 Years of Service
    Robin Young
    CICSP Clinical Lab Coordinator

    11 Years of Service
    Michelle Sahl, PhD, Med, MBA, MBE
    Associate Teaching Professor, Health Services Administration

    10 Years of Service
    Joseph Rubertone, PhD, MPT
    Associate Clinical Professor, Health Sciences and Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences
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