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Fall Courses



July 23, 2019

Explore your interests in these cool fall courses — from war narratives to the history of the universe and the link between philosophy, politics and economics.

English

Gender, Writing and War (ENGL 360)
This course explores who is authorized to speak about war — and what those voices have to say. Focusing on American literature, the course asks participants to analyze examples of war writing (from the Civil War to Iraq) and ask questions about how gender influences the stories that are told — and why this might matter to us.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Karen Nulton, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students who have taken ENGL 103 (minimum grade: D) or ENGL 105 (minimum grade: A). It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:30 – 10:50 a.m. Location TBD

Philosophy

Plato: Early Dialogues (PHIL 212)
This course provides an introductory overview of classical Greek philosophy presented through a reading of some early dialogues of Plato.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Marilyn Piety, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:00 – 3:20 p.m. Location TBD

Pre-Socratic Philosophy (PHIL 481)
This is an in-depth seminar on themes and thinkers of the era of Greek philosophy before Socrates (b. 470 - d. 399 BCE). This class can be used to fulfill the PHIL421: Ancient Philosophy seminar requirement.

This 3.0 credit writing intensive course, taught by Jacques Catudal, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students with at least two 200-level or higher PHIL classes. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. Location TBD

Philosophy, Politics & Economics

Introduction to Philosophy, Politics & Economics (PPE 101)
This course introduces the interdisciplinary major Philosophy, Politics & Economics in two ways: It examines ways of thinking, speaking and researching in each of the three component disciplines, and it applies these overlapping approaches to a set of complex, real-world problems.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Peter Amato, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:30 – 10:50 a.m. Location TBD

Physics

Survey of the Universe (PHYS 131)

Survey of the Universe provides an overview of modern astronomy, including the scientific method; telescopes; stars and star clusters; stellar evolution; galaxies and the large-scale structure of the universe; and the Big Bang. This course was featured in the DrexelNow series “A Day in the Class,” showcasing some of Drexel University's most interesting and impactful courses: Intro to Astronomy Class Provides Innovative, Interpersonal Ways to Discover the Cosmos.

Survey of the Universe is just that — a broad-brush course covering topics from seasons and lunar phases to stars, to galaxies, to the history of the universe — essentially all of astronomy in 10 weeks! This is a three-credit elective course that is not required for any major or minor. While it is designed for students who might not take another science course at Drexel, it also is appropriate for STEM students. It is what many other universities would call “Astronomy 101” (except that students get the added bonus of having a physics course on their transcript!). Ultimately, the purpose is to give students an understanding of how application of the scientific method has enabled humankind to learn about the universe, from near to far.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Gordon Richards, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:30 – 1:50 pm. Location TBD

Sociology

Research Design: Quantitative Methods (SOC 242)
This course provides an introduction to the quantitative methods, techniques and statistical analysis of social science data. The first part of the course broadly covers methodology, including research and design, measurement, sampling and ethical considerations in research. The second part of the course provides practical, hands-on experience with the management, organization and analysis of social science data, as well as the appropriate interpretation, communication and presentation of statistical results.

Topics include frequency distributions, cross-tabulations, T-Tests, correlation and bivariate regression, inferences and hypothesis/significance testing. Statistical software, such as SPSS or R Open-Source, are used for the analysis of various social science data. While no strong previous statistical or advanced mathematical skills are required for enrollment, proficient knowledge of basic mathematics and algebra is needed to succeed in the course.

This 4.0 credit course, taught by Emmanuel Koku, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 – 11:50 a.m. Location: 3101 Market St.