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March

  • What I'm Reading: Dr. Yaba Blay

    March 29, 2013

    Dr. Yaba Blay, professor of Africana Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, reads nonstop as part of her research and teaching. This does not leave her much time for recreational reading, but she recently made time for the book by Peter Bregman. Blay describes the book as a quick read—something she didn’t want to put down—and the perfect recommendation for a self-described busy person and multi-tasker.

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  • Texting While Driving: Unsafe at Any Speed?

    March 29, 2013

    Big headlines today state the obvious: Texting while driving is dangerous, practically everyone knows it, and a lot of people do it anyway. That’s the widely reported finding of a new AT&T survey about texting while driving: More than 98 percent of adult drivers know it’s unsafe, but almost half of them admitted to doing it anyway.

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  • Lauren Greenberg Receives APA Division 38 Graduate Student Research Award

    March 29, 2013

    Lauren Greenberg, Ph.D. student, under the mentorship of Drs. Art and Chris Nezu, professors of psychology, CoAS, was recently granted the Graduate Student Research Award ($1500) from Health Psychology, Division 38 of the American Psychological Association (APA).

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  • Yaba Blay

    What I’m Reading: Yaba Blay

    March 27, 2013

    Dr. Yaba Blay, professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, recently made time to read18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done by Peter Bregman,  which examines the disadvantages of multitasking and long to-do lists.

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  • New Fossil from a Fish-Eat-Fish World Driving the Evolution of Limbed Animals

    March 27, 2013

    Scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University have described another new lobe-finned fossil fish species from the same time and place in the Canadian Arctic as the famous precursor to limbed animals, Tiktaalik roseae, which they discovered several years ago. 

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  • Q&A with Bill Rosenberg: The GOP Seeks a New Way Forward

    March 27, 2013

    After a difficult election season that ended with Mitt Romney's loss to President Barack Obama, the Republican National Committee’s Growth and Opportunity Project released a report last week calling on the party to make sweeping changes in order to court younger voters.

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  • Dusting for Prints from a Fossil Fish to Understand Evolutionary Change

    March 27, 2013

    In 370 million-year-old red sandstone deposits in a highway roadcut, scientists have discovered a new species of armored fish in north central Pennsylvania. Fossils of armored fishes like this one, a phyllolepid placoderm, are known for the distinctive ornamentation of ridges on their exterior plates. As with many such fossils, scientists often find the remains of these species as impressions in stone

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  • Xiaobo Bai Wins Best Poster Presentation Award

    March 27, 2013

    Xiaobo Bai won the first prize award for best poster presentation at the Septin 2013 Conference in Hefei, China

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  • New Fossil Species Fill in the Picture of a Fish-Eat-Fish World Driving the Evolution of Limbed Animals

    March 27, 2013

    We call it a ‘fish-eat-fish world,’ an ecosystem where you really needed to escape predation,” said describing life in the Devonian

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  • Papadakis Building Named 'Philadelphia Project of the Year'

    March 26, 2013

    Drexel’s Constantine N. Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building (PISB) was awarded the Philadelphia Project of the Year by the Pennsylvania chapter of the March of Dimes in March. Jim Tucker, senior vice president for Student Life and Administrative Services, accepted the award on behalf of Drexel at the March of Dimes’ 20th annual Transportation, Building and Construction Awards Luncheon.

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  • Making Axons Branch and Grow to Help Nerve Regeneration After Injury

    March 22, 2013

    One molecule makes nerve cells grow longer. Another one makes them grow branches. These new experimental manipulations have taken researchers a step closer to understanding how nerve cells are repaired at their farthest reaches after injury. The research was recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

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  • Academy Scientists Receive Top Honors for Long-Term Research and Training Initiatives in Mongolia

    March 22, 2013

    In Mongolia, a sparsely populated, resource-endowed country sandwiched between China and Siberia, the climate is changing more rapidly than in many other places on Earth. Rising temperatures have caused rivers and streams to dry up, grass to grow stunted, and, consequently, some nomadic herders to lose their livelihoods.

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  • Twiss Research Team Manipulates Axon Growth to Speed Nerve Regeneration

    March 22, 2013

    One molecule makes nerve cells grow longer. Another one makes them grow branches. These new experimental manipulations have taken researchers a step closer to understanding how nerve cells are repaired at their farthest reaches after injury. The research was recently

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  • Dr. Clyde Goulden (far left) discusses climate change with Mongolian students. Credit: Dr. Bazartseren Boldgiv

    Academy Scientists Receive Top Honors for Long-Term Research and Training Initiatives in Mongolia

    March 21, 2013

    Dr. Clyde Goulden, a pioneering ecologist and director of the Asia Center of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, has devoted his life to studying climate change and how it is affecting Mongolian herders and the pristine 2-million-year-old Lake Hövsgöl. His efforts have now been recognized with Mongolia’s highest award to foreigners, the Order of the Polar Star. In a separate honor, Dr. Jon Gelhaus, Academy curator of entomology and professor in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, has received the Kublai Khan medal for his scientific achievements in Mongolia.

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  • The London Trip: History & Politics Seniors Dive into Research

    March 18, 2013

    The Department of History and Politics added a new international experience to its Senior Thesis Program this year. Over winter break, seven history seniors and their thesis advisor, Dr. Lloyd Ackert, travelled to London to experience the UK archives and libraries up close.

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  • Exclusive Screening: The Drill Project

    March 11, 2013

    Thousands of miles away on Bioko Island of Equatorial Guinea, Drexel researchers have been working to save the endangered primate species Mandrillus leucophaeus, or the drill monkey. These rare animals are threatened with extinction due to the increasing bushmeat trade in West Africa. The Drill Project is a conservation initiative and wildlife documentary featuring never-before-seen footage of the drill in its natural habitat. The film was shot entirely by Drexel biologist Dr. Shaya Honarvar and conservation biologist and director Justin Jay.

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  • A New Issue of Mobilities

    March 07, 2013

    There is a new special issue of Mobilities focusing on borders and mobilities. Articles by: Tim Richardson, Mark B. Salter, Jørgen Ole Bærenholdt, Anne Jensen, Sanneke Kloppenburg and more.

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  • New Exchange Program with Simon Fraser University

    March 07, 2013

    Dr. Kirk Heilbrun , professor, psychology, CoAS, is setting up an exchange program with Simon Fraser University (SFU), one of the premier forensic psychology programs in the world.

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  • Q&A with George Ciccariello-Maher: The Death of Hugo Chávez

    March 07, 2013

    Hugo Chávez, longtime president of Venezuela and one of the most polarizing figures in world politics, passed away on Monday after a long battle with cancer. In the wake of his passing, the reaction from Venezuela and elsewhere has been, fittingly, mixed. Some are mourning the passing of a man they saw as a revolutionary—a president who helped fight poverty and improve living conditions in the South American nation of nearly 30 million. Others believe Chávez was a tyrant who used his position to sidestep the democratic process and secure his place in power.

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  • New Drexel University Graduate Program Will Prepare Students for Museum Leadership

    March 05, 2013

    A new graduate program in Drexel University’s Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design will prepare students for leadership roles in museums nationally and internationally. The Master of Science degree is designed to meet the needs of both mid-level museum professionals who want to advance their careers and students who are aspiring leaders in the field

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  • Now Accepting Paper and Panel Submissions for EC/ASECS Annual Meeting

    March 04, 2013

    Scholars and graduate students working in research areas relevant to the 18th century are invited to submit papers and panel suggestions for the East-Central/American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies’ annual fall meeting, “Retirement, Reappraisal, and Renewal in the Eighteenth Century.”

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