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Elizabeth Gonzalez

Elizabeth Gonzalez

PhD, PMHCNS-BC

Associate Professor, Department Chair of Doctoral Nursing Program

Division of Graduate Nursing
Doctor of Nursing Practice Department

215-762-8331 P
215-762-4542 F
ewg22@drexel.edu

Bellet Building, Rm. 507

Elizabeth W. Gonzalez, Ph.D., PMHCNS-BC is a tenured associate professor at Drexel University in Philadelphia. She earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing Research and Theory Development from New York University in 1990. She is certified as a clinical specialist in Adult Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing by the American Nurses Credentialing Center and maintains a private practice. A frequent participant in scientific forum, her research contributions have been in depression among the elderly, minority health issues, stress in caregiving, and cross-cultural research among family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer`s disease. She was a Faculty Scholar for the Hartford Gerontological Institute in Nursing Research at NYU, and a Research Fellow at the Center for Health Equality in Drexel University. She was a recipient of the Research Development Award from the American Nurses Association, Ethnic Minority Fellowship Programs and a fellow at the SAMSHA. Dr. Gonzalez was selected to participate in the summer institute on minority research in aging funded by NIA. She received a Supplement Grant from the National Institute on Aging to examine similarities and differences in coping and resourcefulness in African American and Caucasian family caregivers of person with dementia, and synergy grant from Drexel University to determine the feasibility of enhancing resourcefulness in family caregivers. She received the Academic Research Enhancement Award (R15) from the National Institute for Nursing Research to determine the effects of enhancing resourceful skills in family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease on caregiver and patient outcomes. She is currently collaborating with researchers in biomedical engineering and architecture to determine the effects of LED Daylighting Luminaire to reduce symptoms of dementia. She serves on the Nursing Research Review Committee for the American Nurses Foundation, and Nursing and Related Clinical Sciences Study Section of NINR.