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Diane Sicotte, PhD

Associate Professor of Sociology

Diane Sicotte

Office: PSA 221
Phone: 215.895.2264
Email: dms76@drexel.edu


Education

  • BS, Sociology, Portland State University
  • MA, Sociology, Arizona State University
  • PhD, Sociology, Arizona State University, 2003

Research and Teaching Interests

  • Environmental Sociology
  • Environmental inequality and injustice (using both qualitative historical and quantitative geographical methods)
  • Political Sociology
  • Social Stratification and Inequality
  • Urban social inequalities of race, class and gender

Research Projects

  • 2010 Principal Investigator – The Making of Environmental Injustice in Greater Philadelphia.
  • 2009 Principal Investigator – Cumulative Environmental Hazards in the Philadelphia MSA.

Biography

Diane Sicotte’s research focuses on social and environmental inequalities, and environmental injustice. Recent research projects include identifying the Philadelphia-area communities most burdened with environmental hazards; an analysis of social characteristics that coincide with living near the most hazardous facilities in the Philadelphia area; and studies of environmental injustice in inner-city Phoenix and an Arizona copper mining town. She teaches a variety of courses at Drexel, including Environmental Justice, Sociology of the Environment, Sociology of Disasters, Urban Sociology and Women and Men in a Changing Society.


Selected Publications

  • Sicotte, Diane. Don’t Waste Us: Environmental Justice through Urban Planning in Philadelphia, USA. Environmental Justice, 3(1): 1-5, 2010.
  • Sicotte, Diane. Profit, Pollution and Racism: The Development of Environmental Injustice in a Copper Smelter Town. Human Ecology Review, 16(2): 141-150, 2010.
  • Sicotte, Diane. Dealing in Toxins on the Wrong Side of the Tracks: Lessons From a Hazardous Waste Controversy in Phoenix. Social Science Quarterly, 89(5): 1136-1151, 2008.
  • Sicotte, Diane and Samantha Swanson. Whose Risk in Philadelphia? Proximity to Unequally Hazardous Industrial Facilities. Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 88, Num. 2: 515-534, 2007.