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Dario Salvucci

Professor & Department Head

Computer Science

Salvucci's research focuses on computational models of human cognition and behavior, with a particular emphasis on multitasking and driving. His recent book, The Multitasking Mind (with Niels Taatgen), describes a new theory for how people manage multiple tasks in everyday situations. He has received a number of awards including the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Drexel College of Engineering Outstanding Teaching Award, the Fred Burggraf Prize at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, and the Siegel-Wolf Prize at the International Conference on Cognitive Modeling. He has also served on the Franklin Institute Committee on Science and the Arts and the editorial boards of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ToCHI), Human Factors and Psychological Review.

Education

  • PhD, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
  • MS, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
  • BSE, Computer Science, summa cum laude, Princeton University

Research/Teaching Interests

Cognitive science, cognitive architectures, human-computer interaction, human factors, multitasking and interruptions, applications to driving and driver distraction

Select Publications

  • Salvucci, D. D. (2013). Distraction beyond the driver: Predicting the effects of in-vehicle interaction on surrounding traffic. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: CHI 2013. New York: ACM Press. [Best of CHI Award Honorable Mention]
  • Salvucci, D. D., & Taatgen, N. A. (2011). The Multitasking Mind. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Salvucci, D. D. (2009). Rapid prototyping and evaluation of in-vehicle interfaces. ACM Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction, 16, 9:1-9:33.
  • Mankowski, W., Bogunovich, P., Shokoufandeh, A., & Salvucci, D. D. (2009). Finding canonical behaviors in user protocols. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: CHI 2009 (pp. 1323-1326). New York: ACM Press. [Best of CHI Award]
  • Salvucci, D. D., & Taatgen, N. A. (2008). Threaded cognition: An integrated theory of concurrent multitasking. Psychological Review, 115, 101-130.
  • Brumby, D. P., Howes, A., & Salvucci, D. D. (2007). A cognitive constraint model of dual-task trade-offs in a highly dynamic driving task. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: CHI 2007 (pp. 233-242). New York: ACM Press. [Best of CHI Award Honorable Mention]
  • Salvucci, D. D. (2006). Modeling driver behavior in a cognitive architecture. Human Factors, 48, 362-380.

Grant Awards

  • Cognitive Supermodels: Large-Scale Models of Skill and Knowledge Developed in a Cognitive Architecture (2011-2014). Office of Naval Research, $501,876. [PI]
  • Multitasking and Learning in a Cognitive Architecture (2005-2008). Office of Naval Research (#N00014-03-1-0036), $336,811. [PI]
  • Defining Virtual Reality Driving in Traumatic Brain Injury (2007-2011). National Institutes of Health, $991,769. [Co-PI]
  • Multitasking and Learning in a Cognitive Architecture (2005-2008). Office of Naval Research (#N00014-03-1-0036), $336,811. [PI]
  • ITR: Rapid Evaluation of User Interfaces in Multitasking Environments (2004-2008). National Science Foundation (#IIS-0426674), $1,000,000. [PI]
  • Modeling Human Multitasking in the ACT-R Cognitive Architecture (2002-2005). Office of Naval Research (#N00014-03-1-0036), $278,014. [PI]
  • CAREER: A Computational Architecture for Tracking Cognitive Processes (2002-2007). National Science Foundation (#IIS-0133083), $336,063. [PI]

Awards & Recognition

  • Best of CHI Award or Honorable Mention, ACM CHI Conference, 2007, 2009, 2013
  • Outstanding Teaching Award, Drexel University College of Engineering, 2008
  • National Science Foundation CAREER Award, 2002-2007
  • Fred Burggraf Award for excellence by a young researcher, Transportation Research Board, 2002
  • Siegel-Wolf Award for Best Applied Paper, International Conference on Cognitive Modeling, 2001
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, 1994-1997
  • George A. Miller Prize for best Cognitive Science independent study, Princeton University, 1994