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College of Arts & Sciences Program Level Outcomes

Upon degree completion, graduates of our programs will be able to...

MS-Biological Sciences (Non-Thesis Option)

  • Develop a strong foundation in the fields of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics and molecular biology. 
  • Career advancement through graduate level coursework
  • Stepping stone for students to become more competitive for PhD programs
  • Critically read and analyze their own work and the biology literature with respect to global impact and experimental design
  • Communicate effectively in science
  • Successful completion of comprehensive exam

Anthropology

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the field of anthropology
  • Demonstrate a familiarity with at least one other cultural, geographic or ethnographic region of the world 
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the variety, variability and relativity of social categories and systems of meaning around the world
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate anthropological knowledge through writing and oral presentations
  • Demonstrate the ability to evaluate existing ethnographic literature through the application of basic theoretical and methodological principles within anthropology
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply anthropological concepts to the understanding/critique of one’s own society and cultural practices
  • Be able to design and carry out an ethnographic project that demonstrates an understanding of appropriate anthropological methods, as well as indicate the ability to critique other peoples’ anthropological research
  • Demonstrate a familiarity with the four subfields of anthropology: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology

Biological Sciences

  • Attain a good functional knowledge of general biology content
  • Understand and be able to perform techniques relevant to modern biology
  • Critically read and analyze their own work and the biology literature with respect to global impact and experimental design
  • Communicate effectively in science
  • Understand how to conduct science in an ethical manner
  • Be prepared effectively for a career or future schooling in biology or related fields

Chemistry

  • Communicate scientific ideas effectively using scientifically relevant language
  • Be resourceful and engage in critical and analytical thinking to solve problems
  • Be facile with chemical computations
  • Have an understanding of how atomic-and molecular-scale structure governs macroscopic properties and reactivity
  • Have developed an appropriate set of laboratory skills
  • Practice ethical and professional behavior as described in the American Chemical Society Guidelines

Communication

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how communication in a variety of contexts is central to the human experience
  • Clearly and effectively develop, express, and defend their ideas in oral, written, visual, and electronic formats
  • Demonstrate and apply major communication concepts and theories and be conversant in communication literature
  • Demonstrate competence in applying major concepts and theories in the production of professional messages
  • Interpret the impact that changes in technology have on thinking, learning, remembering, and creating; and adapt new technology for new applications
  • Demonstrate fluency in a variety of communication methods; be able to locate, review, and evaluate existing literature; develop and hone research ideas; and conduct original research.
  • Demonstrate literacy concerning mass media institutions and structures; appreciate the vital role of media in sustaining democracy and an informed citizenry
  • Integrate awareness of diverse audiences, cultures, and contexts into students’ learning and professional experiences--this should include globalization.

Criminology and Justice Studies

  • Fluently discuss the processes by which institutions of the public justice system (e.g., police, courts, corrections) label, adjudicate and sanction criminal offenders (Justice Process; Procedural Law; Crime and the City)
  • Describe the major theories of crime and criminal offending (Criminology; Advanced Criminological Theorizing, Crime and City)
  • Explain the major legal and/or due process requirements that both enable and constrain the justice system (Criminal Procedure; Police Authority and Accountability; Surveillance, Technology, and the Law)
  • Identify and evaluate crime policies and policy gaps in order to determine the extent to which they are consistent with current societal values and legal doctrine (Criminal Procedure; Justice Process; Crime and Public Policy; Capstone in Criminology and Justice Studies)
  • Apply the standard benchmarks of scientific rigor (i.e., reliability and validity) and ethics to evaluate the quality of scientific studies, particularly those that are related to public policy (Methods and Analytics I, II, & III; Crime Mapping Using GIS; Intelligence Led Decision Making, Program Evaluation; Criminal Justice Ethics)
  • Organize, analyze, and visualize data, as well as interpret findings from quantitative and qualitative analyses (Methods and Analytics I, II, & III; Crime Mapping Using GIS; Intelligence Led Decision Making, Program Evaluation)
  • Translate through written expression the meaning and value of statistical findings derived from data analysis (Writing Intensive courses. Methods and Analytics I, II, & III; Crime Mapping Using GIS; Intelligence Led Decision Making, Program Evaluation; Capstone in Criminology and Justice Studies)
  • Describe the role of government and culture in shaping the roles and behaviors of our institutions of formal and informal social control (Race, Crime and Justice; Criminology, Gender, Crime, and Justice, Justice in Our Community; Prison, Society, and You)
  • Compare and contrast cross-cultural perspectives that shape formal and informal social institutions, including those responsible for institutions of social control (Non-Democratic Policing: The Rise of the Nazi Police System; Comparative Justice Systems: courses in the Global Competence sequence; Justice in Our Community; Prison, Society and You)

Drexel University Preparation Program (UPREP)

  • Demonstrate an ability to manage time effectively to complete UPREP program requirements
  • Demonstrate proficiency in English at the advanced level, including knowledge of different sociolinguistic registers and contexts for language use
  • Demonstrate understanding of, and ability to adjust behavior to, the norms and expectations of the U.S. classroom
  • Demonstrate ability to effectively present research about academic goals.
  • Demonstrate understanding of Drexel academic, cultural and civic values contexts and values
  • Demonstrate appreciation of and ability to communicate with people of different language and cultural backgrounds
  • Demonstrate proficiency in English for academic writing
  • Demonstrate understanding of and ability to effectively navigate university online systems and tools to fulfill classroom expectations.

English

  • Demonstrate knowledge of major genres, authors and the cultural and historical contexts of literary periods.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking, writing and textual analysis skills
  • Demonstrate research skills and facility with terms and methods of critical analysis and synthesis
  • Demonstrate strong analytical, communication, technological and writing skills that enable students to make intertextual connections between material in their coursework and examine the relationships between literature and the world.
  • By virtue of their coursework, internship and coop experience, be prepared for careers or graduate work in the humanities, law, teaching, professional writing and other fields

English Language Center [Intensive English Program – IEP]

  • Demonstrate proficiency in English at the advanced level, including knowledge of different sociolinguistic registers and contexts for language use
  • Demonstrate understanding of, and ability to adjust behavior to, the norms and expectations of the U.S. university classroom
  • Demonstrate understanding of and ability to effectively participate in the language practices of U.S. higher education, including forms of reasoning, argumentation, and documentation
  • Demonstrate understanding of U.S. cultural and civic contexts and values
  • Demonstrate appreciation of and ability to communicate with people of different language and cultural backgrounds

English Language Center [Gateway Program]

  • Demonstrate proficiency in English at the advanced level, including knowledge of different sociolinguistic registers and contexts for language use
  • Demonstrate understanding of, and ability to adjust behavior to, the norms and expectations of the U.S. university classroom
  • Demonstrate understanding of and ability to effectively participate in the language practices of U.S. higher education, including forms of reasoning, argumentation, and documentation
  • Demonstrate understanding of U.S. cultural and civic contexts and values
  • Demonstrate appreciation of and ability to communicate with people of different language and cultural backgrounds
  • Demonstrate proficiency in English for academic purposes in specific content courses
  • Demonstrate understanding of and ability to effectively navigate university online systems and tools to fulfill classroom expectations and communicate with faculty.
  • Demonstrate improved proficiency on standardized English assessments needed for entry to an American university.

Environmental Science [BEES]

  • Attain a functional knowledge of general biodiversity, earth, and environmental sciences.
  • Understand and be able to perform laboratory and field techniques relevant to modern biodiversity, earth, and environmental sciences. 
  • Critically read and analyze their own work and the biodiversity, earth, and environmental science literature with respect to global impact and experimental design.
  • Communicate science effectively.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to conduct science in an ethical manner.
  • Be prepared effectively for a career and/or future schooling in environmental science or related fields.

Environmental Studies & Sustainability

  • Demonstrate an understanding of key environmental issues facing our planet: including global climate change; air, soil and water quality; human, plant and animal ecosystems; and sustainable land use, transportation, food-agricultural systems
  • Distinguish larger, complex societal forces, including social, political and economic systems that affect environmental trends and policy responses to environmental problems
  • Apply the skills and methods in social and environmental and research. These include basic scientific method in ecological and earth sciences; as well as the social sciences, including, public policy; economics, politics; law; sociology; communications; and anthropology. Skills should include primary and secondary data collection, analysis, interpretation and the policy implications of data
  • Communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, while demonstrating basic knowledge of information technology as applied to environmental research and practice
  • Competently apply both the legal and professional standards that govern proper behavior and ethical responsibility in environmental employment settings
  • Demonstrate a sensitivity to racial, ethnic, cultural, and gender diversity in our society at large and in the area of environmental justice specifically
  • Identify, formulate, and solve problems both individually as well as part of group focused on specific problems or issues

First-Year Writing Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop a positive attitude toward writing and themselves as writers
  • Write clearly and fluently
  • Improve writing style, grammar, and punctuation
  • Engage in research and integrate information from sources into their own writing
  • Understand how writing is influenced by differences in purpose, readers, and conventions
  • Write on their own to create, to learn, to express themselves, and to communicate with others

Geoscience

  • Attain a functional knowledge of earth sciences
  • Understand and be able to perform laboratory and field techniques relevant to earth sciences
  • Improve writing style, grammar, and punctuation
  • Critically read and analyze works, including their own, in the earth science literature with respect to global impact and experimental design
  • Communicate science effectively
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to conduct science in an ethical manner. Demonstrate an understanding of how to conduct science in an ethical manner
  • Be prepared effectively for a career and/or future schooling in environmental science or related fields

History

  • Demonstrate chronologically, geographically, and thematically broad historical knowledge.
  • Identify, synthesize, and critique academic and nonacademic historical arguments.
  • Choose appropriate tools and methods to find and interpret historical source materials.
  • Design and carry out a substantial project of original historical research.
  • Communicate research findings clearly, accurately, and effectively in appropriate formats.
  • Understand historical phenomena in their contexts and in relation to contemporary issues.
  • Apply ethical principles in historical research and communication

Global Studies

  • Conduct research in the areas of global cultural studies, and write an extensive, well-argued thesis their senior year on a topic related to a region where they have language and cultural competence
  • Demonstrate mastery of at least one foreign language at the 300 level or above as measured by standardized testing
  • Analyze the position of the United States in the larger global context through understanding of social and economic relationships; apply basic economic and social theory to US relations and explain their significance
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the politics, history, economics, sociology, anthropology, literature and philosophy of a particular region/country, complementing their language study
  • Demonstrate the ability to read, digest, and analyze academic writing (journal articles, peer-reviewed books) and apply that ability to the work-place during their coops

Students in the Global Business, Economics, and Development Concentration:

  • Demonstrate basic business skills in a cross-cultural context, e.g., international marketing
  • Apply basic business and economics concepts to explain international business trends
  • Explain the key challenges faced by corporations seeking to expand globally or invest in foreign economies
  • Discuss the ethical and cultural issues facing global corporations

Students in the Global Justice and Human Rights Concentration:

  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of international human rights law and practice
  • Explain and analyze the role of development agencies in promoting global economic growth and helping developing world economies
  • Apply social and political theory to key issues of international humanitarian crises and the divide between wealth and developing countries
  • Apply a knowledge of social and political theory to the particular country or region where they have language and cultural competence

Students in the Global Media, Arts, and Culture Concentration:

  • Examine different forms of media (print, audiovisual, digital) from the perspective of production, consumption, and representation
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge of world literature, art, and culture, and be able to apply cultural theory to draw connections and make contrasts
  • Write effective, persuasive, and well-composed essays on literary or artistic topics, and demonstrate the ability to apply this writing and composition skill to other forms of writing, for example effective business writing, or academic prose
  • Show expertise in the literature or cultural movements of a particular region through having lived there for study abroad, or by writing papers focused on that region

Students in the Global Health and Sustainability Concentration:

  • Demonstrate exposure to the fields of international environmental science, international public health, or international education, in a way that prepares them either for work or graduate studies in one or more of these areas
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the environmental, health, and/or educational challenges facing developing regions, particularly in respect to balancing these concerns with the need for economic growth
  • Speak and write authoritatively about the environmental, health, and/or educational challenges facing the country or region where they speak the language and about which they have done study abroad or otherwise focused their work
  • Analyze and solve problems related to international development with an emphasis on environmental science, sustainability, health, or education

Mathematics

  • Demonstrate problems-solving skills in a broad range of significant mathematical contexts   
  • Understand what constitutes mathematical thinking, and be able to produce and judge the validity of mathematical arguments      
  • Produce clear and valid proofs
  • Demonstrate substantial computer programming skills
  • Interact effectively with collaborators in other disciplines
  • Present mathematical information clearly, both orally and in writing, in a way that is appropriate for the audience

Modern Languages

  • Communicate effectively via spoken interaction
  • Develop written communication skills for structuring complex arguments
  • Demonstrate cultural competence for societies in which language is spoken
  • Apply research skills to present detailed written and oral arguments in target language

Philosophy

  • Structure and express ideas in ways that are coherent, truthful, and fair
  • Employ logical analysis effectively and acknowledge the conditions for rational dialogue, argumentation, and debate
  • Interpret complex, nuanced texts and respond to them reflectively and critically
  • Think for themselves, and appreciate the value of having a perspective that goes beyond the sciences and career pursuits
  • Recognize the forms ethical reasoning takes and the impact of personal and social choices on the happiness, well-being, and aspirations of others
  • Understand what the main problems, concepts, and distinctions in academic Philosophy are, and how to pursue research in some of these areas

Physics

  • Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental principles and concepts of physics which include mechanics, electromagnetism, thermodynamics, and quantum mechanics
  • Demonstrate ability to acquire, analyze and interpret experimental scientific data in core areas of physics and in complex problems
  • Demonstrate analytic thinking and problem solving skills
  • Demonstrate ability to read, understand, and critically analyze the physical ideas presented in published textbooks and journal articles
  • Use computer algorithms and simulations to solve physics problems and test physical models
  • Demonstrate ability to present information clearly, logically, and critically, both orally and in writing
  • Demonstrate both an understanding and the practical application of the ethical standards implicit in science, such as appropriate attribution of ideas, good recordkeeping, and truthful presentation of data and conclusions
  • Be fully prepared for graduate study in physics and/or research and professional careers in physical sciences, industry, and/or government

Political Science

  • Demonstrate an expertise in using the research methods of political science
  • Apply critical thinking skills for the consumption and interpretation of academic and nonacademic knowledge
  • Demonstrate informational and technological literacy
  • Demonstrate mastery of the subject matter of core content areas of research in political science
  • Communicate empirical findings and critical analysis of research findings effectively in oral and written presentations
  • Demonstrate the ability to design and report original research in political science
  • Demonstrate the application of the ethical principles of research in political science

Psychology

  • Demonstrate a general knowledge base of psychology (e.g., familiarity with major concepts, theoretical perspectives, professional trends, explain why Psychology is a science, etc.)
  • Use the research methods and statistics of psychology (e.g., understand and apply basic methodology including design, data analysis, and interpretation)
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in psychology (e.g., respect and use critical/creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes)
  • Understand the application of psychology (e.g., understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and/or organizational issues)
  • Demonstrate appropriate informational technology literacy skills (e.g., competence at obtaining/researching professional information and using computers or other technology for professional/educational purposes)
  • Possess communication skills (e.g., communicate effectively in a variety of settings, use APA style effectively in empirically based reports, literature reviews, and theoretical papers)
  • Demonstrate sociocultural and international awareness (e.g., recognize, understand, respect sociocultural and international diversity)

Sociology

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of sociological theory
  • Apply a basic knowledge of sociological research methods to sociological investigations
  • Articulate a basic knowledge of substantive fields of study within sociology
  • Be a critical reader of sociological research and scholarship
  • Be a critical student of real world social issues and problems
  • Design and carry out sociological research and data collection
  • Analyze and communicate research findings