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Research

ceramic materials

A Strength Supplement For Aerospace Materials

In an exciting development for the field of aerospace engineering, the lightweight materials of airplanes and rockets might soon be getting stronger. A new method for making ceramic materials — which are used in propellers and heat shields — has enabled the introduction of chemical compounds to bolster their strength and could also imbue them with other useful properties. The discovery was recently reported by researchers at Drexel University and Penn State University.

A pregnant woman in a dress holding her stomach

The Longer Women Live in Poor Neighborhoods, the Less Likely They Are to Gain Healthy Pregnancy Weight, Study Shows

The length of time a woman spends in poorer neighborhoods was found to be negatively tied to gaining a healthy amount of pregnancy weight, which is important for newborn health.
Credit: Emily Cheng

Player-Only Villages on College Campuses Could Hinder Student Development

“If you build it, they will come” seems to be the mantra of top football programs around the country that have invested in the creation of exclusive player-only villages. Coaches are behind the concept of the “Athletic Village,” believing it will enhance the togetherness of their team. However, researchers are raising caution to the exclusivity of these compounds – which may support the further segregation of athletes from the campus population that can cause significant social and personal drawbacks.

Microtubule after tau depletion

Study Challenges Approach to Treating Alzheimer's

These findings suggest that microtubule-stabilizing drugs currently in clinical trials may not be effective in treating Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases associated with the dysfunction of the protein called tau.
chiller

Drexel's Scale-Fighting Force Field Protects Air Conditioning Systems From Mineral Deposition

Mineral deposition or scaling, is a naturally occurring phenomenon at the root of a number of problems that could menace water-cooled HVAC systems. Drexel University Professor Young Cho, PhD, who has studied the problem for decades, invented a device that can generate an electric field to ward off scaling in systems of all sizes.
Students in BIO 213

Biology Class Builds Research Skills, Autonomy in Underclassmen

Freshmen and sophomore biology students at Drexel can take the elective BIO 213, which introduces them to independent, novel research and a hands-on learning opportunity working with fruit flies.

kidney transplant

How Medicaid Expansion Changed the Kidney Transplant Waitlist 

A new study from Drexel researchers suggests that Medicaid expansion may have helped to curb racial and socioeconomic disparities in chronic kidney disease care.
transcranial magnetic stimulation

How Brain Signals Travel to Drive Language Performance

Using transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, Drexel psychologists have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.
Brain AI Intelligence

Studying the Brain at Work

More than 100 experts will convene to discuss the emerging field of research, which aims to design systems for safer, more efficient operations and to advance the understanding of the relationship between the brain and everyday human tasks.
Preparation of MXene membranes

MXene’s Tour de Force

Is there anything MXene materials can’t do? Since the discovery of a large new family of two-dimensional materials by Drexel University researchers in 2011, continued exploration has revealed their exceptional ability to store energy, block electromagnetic interference, purify water and even ward off bacteria. And, as recent research now suggests, MXenes are also very durable — the strongest material of its kind, according to a new study in the journal Science Advances.

Photo of a boy and a girl working on a science project

Drexel’s ExCITe Center Releases First National Study of K-12 Education Makerspaces

The ExCITe Center at Drexel University released Making Culture, the first in-depth examination of K-12 education makerspaces nationwide, revealing the significance of cultural aspects of making that enable learning.

One mask depicting half of a normal face and another looking like the Hulk, and another with no mouth and faded red and white stripes

Study Links Content of Service Members' Art to Their Trauma Levels

A new study conducted at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence found that military service members recovering from PTSD who still identified as a member of a unit have lower levels of psychological injuries.