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Research

Lithium-Sulfur cathode

A Stabilizing Influence Enables Lithium-Sulfur Battery Evolution

A new approach for making cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries, reported by researchers in the College of Engineering, could help to prevent a performance-sapping phenomenon that has been preventing their progress toward commercial use. Their method for infusing sulfur into the cathode cuts a time-consuming process down to just five seconds and does it without using toxic chemicals which are often a necessary part of production.

Firefighters

Drexel Researchers Improving Firefighter Safety

Researchers at Drexel University will assess and train firefighters nationwide to improve on-the-job safety and prevent injuries. The project, called FOCUS 2.0, is funded by a $1.5 million grant from FEMA and DHS.
Faculty Highlights

Faculty Highlights: Grants and Awards From Spring and Summer 2018

Over the past two terms, there has been a lot of research funding, commercialization activity and faculty honors at Drexel University.
DARE

Lights, Camera, DARE: New Video Series Celebrates Drexel’s Interdisciplinary Research Initiatives

The Office of the Provost and the Office of Research are highlighting interdisciplinary research initiatives through a new video series.
Philadelphia Skyline

Drexel Researcher Receives NIH Director's Award to Study City Growth

Usama Bilal, MD, PhD, an assistant research professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, has been awarded a $1.25-million Early Independence Award from the National Institutes of Health.
Doctor taking woman's blood pressure

Medicaid Expansion Helped Immigrants, But Disparities Persist

The disparity between uninsured noncitizens and native citizens grew between 2010 and 2015, according to new research from the Dornsife School of Public Health.
Meghan Barrett

PhD Candidate Finds Place for Entomological Research, Teaching Goals to Grow at Drexel

Meghan Barrett, a PhD candidate in Drexel University’s Department of Biology within the College of Arts and Sciences, is sharing her passion for… bugs … with undergraduates and the world. 

MXene spray antenna

Drexel's Spray-On Antennas Could Be the Tech Connector of the Future

A group of researchers from the College of Engineering recently reported a method for spraying invisibly thin antennas, made from a type of two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene, that perform as well as those being used in mobile devices, wireless routers and portable transducers. 


Kidneys

Despite Changes to U.S. Kidney Allocation System, Inequality Persists

Early disease diagnosis and preemptive waitlisting remain the most effective strategies to improve survival chances, says a new College of Medicine study.
Latino health

Undocumented Immigrants Least Likely to See a Doctor, but Still Healthier Than Other Populations

Undocumented immigrants have the worst rates of health care utilization and access, however, they have lower risk of chronic disease than other immigrants and U.S. citizens.
STAR Scholar Summer Showcase 2018

STAR Scholars Shine at Summer Showcase

The STAR Scholars program — which provides first year-students with opportunities to participate in faculty-mentored research or creative work — celebrated the culmination of its summer-long events with its biggest cohort yet.

ferroelectric domain wall material

Once a Performance Barrier, This Material Quirk Could Strengthen Our Telecommunication Connections

Researchers who study and manipulate the behavior of materials at the atomic level have discovered a way to make a thin material that enhances the flow of microwave energy. The advance, which could improve telecommunications, sheds new light on structural traits, generally viewed as static and a hindrance, that, when made to be dynamic, are actually key to the material’s special ability.