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All News tagged "psychology"

Woman typing on a lap top computer

Train Your Brain to Eat Less Sugar

A recent study led by Evan Forman, PhD, a psychology professor in Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences, shows that a computer game can be used to train its players to eat less sugar, as way of reducing their weight and improving their health.
Smartphone screen image of family eating salads while video chatting female counselor for Project PICNIC

Parents Learn Skills to Encourage Healthier Diet in Children, Without Leaving the Dinner Table

A new project from Drexel University's Center for Weight, Eating, and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) called "Project PICNIC" aims to help parents guide their children toward healthier choices, without it turning into a battle of wills.
Person holding a smartphone

Drexel Study: Smartphone App Predicts Diet Lapse 

According to a recent study, led by Evan Forman, PhD, a psychology professor in Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences, a first-of-its-kind smartphone app called OnTrack can predict ahead of time when users are likely to lapse in their weight loss plan and help them stay on track.
Maps of resting-state electrical brain activity, shown as a top view of the head.

What Makes Some People Creative Thinkers and Others Analytical?

A new brain-imaging study from Drexel University's Creativity Research Lab reveals that the different "cognitive styles" of creative and analytical thinkers are due to fundamental differences in their brain activity that can be observed even when people are not working on a problem.
Woman tying shoes in exercise clothes

Can a 6-hour Program Prevent Obesity? Drexel Psychologist Wants to Find Out

What if an hour a week for six weeks could prevent young adults from becoming obese? Meghan Butryn, PhD, a Drexel University psychology professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, is trying to find out.
Mona Elgohail headshot

Meet a Drexel Student Who Used Her Clinical Psychology Education to Combat Suffering of Syrian Refugees in Jordan

Mona Elgohail, a PhD candidate in the clinical psychology program in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, brought her clinical training to a city in Jordan near the Syrian border in order to make a difference in “the worst humanitarian crisis of our time.”

Brain stimulation

Would You Zap Your Brain to Improve Your Memory?

Drexel psychologists studied the public's attitudes toward brain stimulation.
WELL Clinic

Drexel Opens New Treatment Clinic for Eating Disorders and Weight Management

The WELL Clinic will provide evidence-based treatment for weight management, eating disorders and related conditions, all under one roof.

 

transcranial magnetic stimulation

How Brain Signals Travel to Drive Language Performance

Using transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, Drexel psychologists have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.
Schultheis

Maria T. Schultheis Named Interim Dean of Arts and Sciences

As Donna M. Murasko, PhD, prepares to end her 16-year tenure as dean to return to the faculty, the College of Arts and Sciences will move ahead under new leadership with the appointment of Maria T. Schultheis as interim dean, effective July 1.

Gabby D'Andrea, vice president of the Neurodragons, getting ready for an interview at the Eagles' NovaCare Complex late last year. Courtesy of the Philadelphia Eagles.

Neurodragons Will Cheer on Eagles Autism Challenge Riders — And You Can Join Them

Drexel’s new student organization for neurodiverse and neurotypical students plans to be out and cheering when the Eagles Autism Challenge comes rolling through campus.
weight loss

To Improve Self-Control, Call Weight Loss What It Is: Difficult

Painting a realistic picture of the challenges of weight loss can lead to greater long-term outcomes, a new study from a Drexel psychologist shows.