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All In The News tagged "College of Arts and Sciences"

Quarantine Fatigue: Why Some of Us Have Stopped Being Vigilant and How to Overcome It

Eric Zillmer, PsyD, the Carl R. Pacifico professor of Neuropsychology in the College of Arts and Sciences and director of Athletics, was quoted in a June 8 CNN article about how the pandemic and quarantine have caused “caution fatigue,” the decreased sensitivity to repeated warnings, and how to alleviate the stress caused by it. The article was picked up by several outlets across the country, including the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, News & Record (Greensboro, North Carolina) and Erie News Now.

Noticing a Lot of Dead Birds Around Your Neighborhood? Here’s Why.

Jason Weckstein, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences and curator at the Academy of Natural Sciences, was quoted in a May 28 Philadelphia Inquirer article about breeding season for birds and the increase in bird casualties around the city.

For Many Fans, the Absence of Sports Feels Like a Loss. Psychologists Say That’s Normal.

Eric Zillmer, PsyD, the Carl R. Pacifico professor of Neuropsychology in the College of Arts and Sciences and director of Athletics, was quoted in a May 21 Washington Post story about why fans feel the absence of sports like a loss.

‘Zoom Fatigue’ Is Real. Why Video Meetings Strain Your Brain and How to Fix It.

Eric Zillmer, PsyD, the Carl R. Pacifico professor of Neuropsychology in the College of Arts and Sciences and director of Athletics, was quoted in an May 20 Philadelphia Inquirer article about the new issue of “zoom fatigue,” the strain many feel after participating in virtual meetings, and how to fix it. 

COVID-19 Reveals a Path Forward on Climate Change

Richardson Dilworth, PhD; Scott Knowles, PhD; and Mimi Sheller, PhD, professors in the College of Arts & Sciences; and Franco Montalto, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, co-authored a post for American Scientist's "Macroscope" blog on May 12 about how the pandemic might be showing us a path toward stemming climate change. 

How 'Caution Fatigue' May Slow Social Distancing Efforts

Eric Zillmer, PsyD, the Carl R. Pacifico professor of Neuropsychology in the College of Arts and Sciences and director of Athletics, was quoted in an April 30 Philadelphia Inquirer article about how people experiencing caution fatigue, or becoming desensitized to warnings, will affect social distancing effort.

This is Your Brain During a Pandemic

John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in an April 17 episode of NPR “The Pulse” about creativity and production during self-isolation in the pandemic. The story ran on WHYY-RadioKERA-FM (Dallas, Texas), WYPR-FM (Baltimore, Maryland), WGBH-FM (Boston, Massachusetts) and other NPR stations nationwide. Kounios was also quoted in April 18 Ladders and Big Think articles about recently published research on what part of the brain controls creativity and the evolutionary development of creativity.

Black Men Fear Homemade Coronavirus Masks Could Exacerbate Racial Profiling

André Carrington, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a April 9 NBC News article about the CDC’s recommendation to wear a bandana over ones face during the pandemic – and how this could intensifying racial profiling in communities of color.

Surprising Study Finds That Creativity Is Not Actually Right Brain—It Is Left Brain

Recently published research led by John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was mentioned in a April 1 Fast Company article about the study contradicting popular notions about which side of the brain controls creativity. According to Kounios’ study, creative brain activity shifts sides with the level of experience a person has at the creative activity at hand, such as jazz guitarists playing improvisations. 

What Can Previous Disasters Tell Us About the Response to COVID-19, and What Needs to Be Done? 

Scott Knowles, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was interviewed March 30 by NEWSTALK 1010 “The Night Side with Barb Digiulio” about what history and previous disasters can tell us about the response to COVID-19.

Winter Sets Records Across US as Sixth Warmest

David Velinsky, PhD, vice president for Academy Science at the Academy of Natural Sciences and a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a March 27 USA Today article about winter temp records set across the US that made the season the sixth warmest to date.

Trump's Baseless Claim That a Recession Would Be Deadlier Than the Coronavirus

José Tapia, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a March 26 New York Times story about President Trump's claim that an economic recession could be more deadly than the coronavirus pandemic.