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All News tagged "civil engineering"

concrete road

Using Bacteria to Prevent Potholes Caused by Road Salt

Special bacteria that help form limestone and marble could soon have a new job on a road crew. Recent research from Drexel University’s College of Engineering shows how the bacteria, called Sporosarcina pasteurii, can be used to prevent the road degradation caused by ice-melting salt.
Sharon L. Walker, PhD.

Sharon L. Walker Appointed Dean of the College of Engineering

Sharon L. Walker, PhD, a Yale-trained chemical and environmental engineer, will begin as dean of Drexel University's College of Engineering in the fall of 2018.
Drexel's new steel teaching tool.

Meet Drexel’s New 10-Foot-Tall Teaching Tool

The steel teaching sculpture installed outside the Bossone Research Enterprise Center contains all of the members and connections found on any steel building, giving engineering students a hands-on way to visualize what they learn in class.
road melting

Wax On, Melt Off — Researchers Find Adding Paraffin to Concrete Can Help Roads Clear Themselves in The Winter

Drexel University researchers have made a discovery that could help roads keep themselves free of ice and snow during winter storms. Their secret? — Adding a little paraffin wax to the road’s concrete mix.

road cracks

A Recipe For Concrete That Can Withstand Road Salt Deterioration

Road salt, used in copious helpings each winter to protect them from ice and preserve safe driving conditions, is slowly degrading the concrete they’re made of. Engineers have known for some time that calcium chloride salt, commonly used as deicer, reacts with the calcium hydroxide in concrete to form a chemical byproduct that causes roadways to crumble. A civil engineer from Drexel University is working on a new recipe for concrete, using cast-off products from furnaces, that can hold its own against the forces of chemical erosion.
water treatment workers

CDC/WHO Ebola Guidelines Could Put Sewer Workers at Risk

Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that guidelines for safe disposal of liquid waste from patients being treated for the Ebola virus might not go far enough to protect water treatment workers from being exposed. In a study recently published in the journal Water Environment Research, a group of environmental engineering researchers reports that sewer workers downstream of hospitals and treatment centers could contract Ebola via inhalation — a risk that is not currently accounted for in the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention or World Health Organization Ebola response protocol.
sink

Could Low-Flow Create High Risk? EPA Taps Drexel to Study Water Quality Impact of Conservation Practices

As public awareness of the need for water conservation, and new water-saving technology, have become increasingly effective at stemming excess water use, new questions are surfacing about how our plumbing, which was built to handle a regular flow of water, might now be a risk factor for bacterial and chemical contamination. In hopes of preventing future public health crises related to the systems that carry and treat our water, the Environmental Protection Agency is tasking a team of researchers, led by Drexel University, with a $2 million project to bring together existing and new experimental data on building plumbing—the stretch of pipes that takes water from main to tap—into a risk assessment tool that can guide new water use and safety regulations.  
office

Do You Think Before You Breathe? Drexel Survey Finds Broad Misperceptions About Impact of Cleaner Indoor Air

Do you know how easy it is to improve the quality of the air you breathe every day?  Or how much indoor air quality affects your health and productivity?  If you’re not sure, you’re not alone. According to a recent survey by a group of Drexel University environmental and architectural engineering researchers, there is quite a bit of confusion about the costs and benefits of indoor air quality improvement—even among building owners, designers, managers and tenants.

Philadelphia

Drexel and Penn Join White House Smart Cities Initiative

Experts from Drexel University and The University of Pennsylvania’s Institute for Urban Research will join others from cities around the country as participants in a White House initiative to make universities and their host municipalities partners in using technology to solve the challenges that face our nation’s growing urban areas.

Pope Francis

Drexel Experts Available to Comment on Pope's Visit to Philadelphia

Pope Francis – and an estimated 1.5 million people – will descend upon the city of Philadelphia in late September as the capstone to the weeklong, international World Meeting of Families event, during which the Pope will deliver a public mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. From concerns about security measures to transportation, anxiety is already on the rise among Philadelphians regarding how the city will handle the influx of tourists expected to double the city’s population. Drexel University experts are available to comment on a range of issues related to the visit including safety, public health, environmental impact, infrastructure preparedness and tourism. Experts also are able to weigh in about what this once-in-a-lifetime event – and the Pope’s progressive views – mean for the Catholic church.

power plant

DoE Taps Drexel to Reduce Water Use in Power Plant Cooling

Recent drought conditions in California have focused attention on the nation’s need to protect its water supply. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy is looking for a better way to cool off some of the country’s 7,304 power plants—99 percent of which are water-cooled. With DoE support, researchers from the College of Engineer are developing technology that can cool plants with wax instead of water.
water research

Drexel, NJIT and Rowan to Concert Water Research Efforts

Researchers from Drexel University, the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rowan University are aligning themselves with government, private and advocacy groups in hopes of solving challenges that affect the region’s water resources. The research alliance, supported by scholars from all three academic institutions, will function as a data resource, a policy think tank and a lab for creating new technology.