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All News tagged "Biodiversity Earth and Environmental Science"

A fruit fly on a compost pile. Photo by John Tann.

Ladykiller: Artificial Sweetener Proves Deadly for Female Flies

In testing multiple artificial sweeteners, a Drexel University research team found that one was particularly deadly for female fruit flies — and left males relatively untouched.
A scanning electron microscope image of a diatom. Courtesy of Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization.

Tiny Algae Ideal for Sniffing Out Nutrient Pollution in Water

Tiny algae, called diatoms, living in water could be key to providing a definitive and clear measure of whether streams, rivers and lakes have damaging levels of nutrients in them.
A giant panda cooling off with a block of ice. Photo by Mingxi Li.

Pandas Don’t Like It Hot: Temperature, Not Food is Biggest Concern for Conservation

China’s bamboo supply is more than enough to support giant pandas after it was discovered that they have bigger appetites than originally believed, but climate change could destroy their plentiful food source anyway.
The Drexel Naturalists' Association pictured on an excursion in Wissahickon Valley Park.

Celebrate the Great Outdoors with the Drexel Naturalists’ Association

Now that spring has sprung, students can better appreciate nature in and outside of the city with the Drexel Naturalists’ Association.
East fork of the Bear River, one of the study sites.

Un-Muddying Waters: Drexel Researchers Studying Climate Change in Mongolian, U.S. Rivers

As a part of a National Science Foundation macroecology study spanning two continents, a team of researchers from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University will compare river systems in grassland areas of Asia and North America to see how they function and how human activity, including the effects of climate change alters that.
A pair of Ceuthophilus crickets.

Surface-Going Cave Crickets Actually More Isolated Than Cave-Dwelling Cousins

Although other studies on cave-dwelling creatures have found that animals that spend all of their lives in the dark of caves are more likely to be genetically isolated, a recent study on two groups of crickets found the opposite.
Eciton burchellii ants, among the above-ground species that appeared to regrow the parts of the brain used for sight.

Seeing the Light: Army Ants Evolve to Regain Sight and More in Return to Surface’s Complex Environment

A study of army ants revealed that some species increased their brain size, including visual brain regions, after evolving above-ground behavior. Their ancestors had lived mainly underground for nearly 60 million years. Such increases in brain capacity are a rarely-studied evolutionary phenomenon.
The Sundolyra latebrosa specimen photographed for scale.

Academy of Natural Sciences Discovered Life Around the World in 2015

From elusive, rare fish to the potential key to the evolution of river-based plants, scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University played a significant role in adding to the rolls of known species this year.