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All News tagged "Biodiversity Earth and Environmental Science"

Cows Graze by the Delaware Watershed

Are We Really Protecting Rivers and Streams From Pollution? It’s Hard to Say, And That’s a Problem. 

More public and private resources than ever are being directed to protecting and preserving aquatic ecosystems and watersheds. Whether mandated for land development, farming or in response to the growing severity and number of natural disasters – scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University found evidence that decades of watershed restoration and mitigation projects have taken place, but their impact is mostly perceived; data is relatively undocumented — or simply missing.


BEES students seining for fish in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. Photo credit: Richard J. Horwitz.

New Exhibit Explores the Best of the BEES

The Drexel Collection’s new show is centered around the educational and professional opportunities made available by the Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science.
Puerh Panda 2

From Passion to Profit: Drexel Student Starts Tea Business Through Entrepreneurial Co-op

Drexel University student Billy McCullough turned hobby into business in founding Puerh Panda — an online storefront for small-batch teas and accessories — through an entrepreneurial co-op with the Charles D. Close School of Entrepreneurship.

Layered lava flows from the Bushe and Poladpur Formations near the village of Tail Baila. Image credit, Courtney Sprain.

Did an Asteroid Cancel Dinosaurs? The Truth is in the Lava

About sixty-six million years ago a planet-wide catastrophe brought the non-avian dinosaurs to their demise, and the end of the Cretaceous period was marked by a mass extinction of its fauna and flora. New data, published in the journal Science, says it’s possible that intense volcanic eruptions in India coincided with the worldwide extinction – ultimately cementing the fate of the massive reptiles.

Pakims Pond

Research Finds NJ Numerical Nutrient Criterion Used to Protect Streams is Too High 

A new way of measuring the relative habitability of freshwater environments for fish and aquatic insects suggests that New Jersey’s water monitoring and treatment standards could use a boost.


An X-ray view of the heads of a worker and a soldier ant and the brains inside their head. The worker is much smaller with the brain filling more of its head.

You Have One Job: Compared to Multi-Tasking Workers, Soldier Ant Brains Small

A Drexel University study found that ant colonies evolved to spend less energy on developing the brains of soldier ants, who have relatively simple jobs, compared to multi-tasking workers.
Jacob Owens standing and holding Qian Qian

'Pandas' IMAX Movie Follows the First Artificially Bred Panda into the Wild - And Features Plenty of Drexel Connections

From the professor who dreamed up the panda release program to the alums who run it, Dragons play a huge role in "Pandas."
A microscopic image of plasmodium cells

Malaria-Carrying Parasites Spread More When They Can Jump Into Multiple Birds - Study

A study out of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University found that blood parasites that cause malaria spread more widely if they can use many different kinds of birds as hosts. But even those "generalist" parasites are limited.
A turtle ant on a branch with another type of smaller bug

Without 46 Million Year-Old Bacteria, Turtle Ants Would Need More Bite And Less Armor

Socially transmitted, nitrogen-providing microbes have opened a new ecological frontier for herbivorous turtle ants.
Asclepias syriaca with flowers

Plants Evolve Away from Obsolete Defenses When Attacked by Immune Herbivores, Study Shows

A new study shows that plants can evolve out of their obsolete defense mechanisms when facing an immune enemy, an illustration of the “defense de-escalation” evolution theory.
A wide view of a Barnegat Bay salt marsh

Studies Show Barnegat Bay Salt Marshes Provide Millions of Dollars of Water Treatment for Free – For Now

A pair of studies led by Academy of Natural Sciences researchers show that salt marshes along New Jersey’s Barnegat Bay are invaluable for removing nutrients — but they’re threatened by climate change.
Kevin Sievers stands beneath the Academy's intimidating Tyrannosaurus rex.

Fossils Fuel This Student’s Attraction to the Academy

Kevin Sievers has been coming to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University since he was a little kid to learn about the ancient animal history on display. Now, as a Drexel student, he gets to work there.