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All News tagged "science"

Fossil Fuels

Report: Fossil Fuel Industries - The Goliath of Climate-Related Lobbying Efforts, Spent Billions

A new study by Drexel environmental sociologist Robert J. Brulle, PhDshows that between 2000 and 2016, lobbyists spent more than two billion dollars on influencing relevant legislation in the US Congress. As the first peer-reviewed, comprehensive analysis ever conducted of climate lobbying data, Brulle’s research confirms the spending of environmental groups and the renewable energy sector was eclipsed by the spending of the electrical utilities, fossil fuel, and transportation sectors.

Nick Barber

Drexel Student Finds Perfect Fit for Volcano Research Through Gates Cambridge Scholarship

Nicholas Barber, a geoscience student from the College of Arts and Sciences, has become the second Drexel student to be awarded the prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship, making his PhD program at the University of Cambridge cost-free.
Jad Abumrad Lecture

Jad Abumrad Shares Creative Mantras With Drexel Audience Through Lecture

The “Radiolab” creator and co-host described what he learned about himself and the world during his time away from radio as part of the College of Arts and Sciences’ annual Distinguished Lecture Series.


Betsy Payne teachers WINS I students about oyster dissection.

WINS Program Celebrates 35 Years of Opportunity 

The Women in Natural Sciences program at the Academy of Natural Sciences introduces Philadelphia-area high school girls to STEM-focused interactive learning and careers.

Provost Brian Blake with honoree Alison Kenner.

Drexel Honors Outstanding Faculty Achievements at Year-End Awards

At the annual Faculty Recognition Awards Ceremony on May 24, Drexel acknowledged the faculty and staff members whose scholarship, service and teaching contribute so much to the University and its students.
Philadelphia School Partnership presented a $1.2 million grant to Drexel University to launch a residency-based teacher certification program called Dragons Teach Middle Years (DTMY).

Drexel Launches “Dragons Teach Middle Years” Teacher Training Program 
 

Supported by a $1.2 million grant from the Philadelphia School Partnership (PSP), Drexel University’s School of Education will create a new pipeline of dual-certified, Middle-Years teachers, trained specifically for the challenges of Philadelphia classrooms. 

A measuring tape wrapped around a fork

The Science of Eating Disorders

For National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, professors Adrienne Juarascio and Jessica Barson separate fact from fiction and weigh in on the psychological and physiological causes of eating disorders.
A depiction of black holes merging and the gravitational waves that emit from them.

Building Toward Discovery: Drexel Professor’s Role in Finding Gravitational Waves

Sometimes, science is about chipping away at the big questions. One Drexel physics professor recently got credit for his role in developing a big answer.
The LSST in its facility building with the night sky. Courtesy of the LSST Corporation.

Drexel Professor to Use New Telescope to Map Beyond Milky Way

Due to his past involvement with another survey of the night sky, Drexel’s Gordon Richards will take a look out of our galaxy with the help of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which is capable of mapping the entire night sky every three days.
One of the world's earliest geological maps was recently pulled from the Academy Archives and put on display for visitors, but only for a few days as it is quite delicate and rare.

The World Underfoot

Eighteenth-century land surveyor William Smith was a rock star. And we mean that quite literally — Smith’s 1815 map of England, Wales and part of Scotland was the world’s first look at the organization of the earth beneath our feet. Less than 200 copies of this seminal work exist today and the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University owns one of them.
President Fry on a field that includes the Chinese and South Korean flags.

Drexel Delegation Off to China, Korea

President John A. Fry and a group of Drexel colleagues will make stops at academic partners in China and take part in a celebration of a new research and co-op partnership in Korea that gives students access to cutting-edge research and nanotechnology.
Layered lava flows of the Deccan Traps east of Mumbai, India. Photo by Mark Richards.

Did Asteroid Impact or Volcanic Eruption Kill the Dinosaurs? Probably Both, Says New Study

Was it an asteroid impact on Earth 66 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs? Or the eruption of volcanoes in India for hundreds of thousands of years? For decades, paleontologists and geologists have debated the role these two global events played in the last mass extinction. But compelling new evidence supports the hypothesis of a group of geoscientists: that the asteroid’s impact ignited volcanoes around the globe, most catastrophically in India, and that, together, these planet-wide catastrophes caused the extinction of many land and marine animals, including the dinosaurs.