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All News tagged "medicine"

Thomas Trojian, MD, College of Medicine

Ask the Drexel Physician: A Look at Treating Those Nagging Tendon Injuries

Hear from Thomas Trojian, MD, a professor in the Department of Family, Community & Preventive Medicine in the College of Medicine, on some treatment options for those troublesome tendon injuries. 
Chart shows HIV engagement during pregnancy and for two years postpartum. 92% of women received HIV care during pregnancy. 51% had viral suppression at delivery. 38% received HIV care within 3 months after delivery.

Pregnancy is a Missed Opportunity for HIV-Infected Women to Gain Control Over Condition

Pregnancy could be a turning point for HIV-infected women, when they have the opportunity to enter a long-term pattern of maintenance of HIV care after giving birth—but most HIV-infected women aren’t getting that chance, according to a pair of new studies led by Drexel and the Philadelphia Department of Public Health.
Katherine L. Knight

Leading Immunologist Katherine L. Knight to Receive 2015 Marion Spencer Fay Award

Drexel University College of Medicine’s Institute for Women’s Health and Leadership has selected noted immunologist Katherine L. Knight as the 2015 recipient of its Marion Spencer Fay Award. The award, which annually recognizes luminary women in science and medicine, is named for a pioneering former president of the College’s forerunner institution, the Woman’s Medical College of Philadelphia
A memorial for victims who died in incidents of violence in Philadelphia. Photo: Tony Fischer, CC BY 2.0

Drexel Program Helping Violence Victims to Expand Across Philadelphia Hospitals

In Philadelphia, Healing Hurt People, a Drexel trauma-informed, hospital-based violence intervention program is expanding at a city-wide level to widen the opportunity of preventing future injuries as a result of violence instead of just treating them.
A doctor stands by ready to help as paramedics assist a patient on an ambulance.

Hospitals Helping Violence Victims Could Save Millions

Drexel researchers have  published the first study to systematically look at the economic outcomes of programs that help victims of violence change their lives with a hospital-based intervention.
The Coulter-Drexel Translational Research Partnership Program has been described as a "shark tank" kind of experience for researchers.

The Coulter Program: A ‘Shark Tank’ for Academics

How the Coulter Program is helping to bring a breakthrough Parkinson’s treatment — and other Drexel discoveries — out of the academy and into the marketplace.
Scott Lind, MD, center in black suit, with Morton Perlman's family and the TraumaMan training mannequin named for him.

Training Mannequin Named in Honor of Surgery Professor

While it’s common to see buildings named in memory of past University figures, Morton H. Perlman’s name will live on in a very unique way: through a mannequin used to teach trauma situations to aspiring doctors.
Pills photo by jamiesrabbits CC BY 2.0 on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamiesrabbits/5747870989/sizes/l

Teens Abusing Prescription Pills Are A Growing Concern, Drexel Researchers Say

Parents and physicians still aren’t doing enough to address the rise of “pharming,” or recreational use and abuse of prescription drugs, among teenagers, according to public health researchers at Drexel University.

Maps show the prevalence of diabetes in Philadelphia zip codes in 2002 and 2010.

Study Maps How City Neighborhoods Affect Diabetes Risk

A new Drexel study published this month in the journal Advances in Preventive Medicine adds new insight into the role of the physical and social environment on the risk of diabetes, zip code by zip code throughout Philadelphia.
A doctor interacts with a patient while using a laptop computer

How “Psychosocial Vital Signs” in Electronic Medical Records Can Improve Medical Care and Public Health

A committee convened by the Institute of Medicine, including Drexel's Ana Diez Roux, MD, PhD, has released a set of recommendations of 12 social and behavioral measures that should be collected as part of patients’ electronic health records.
Woman blowing her nose

Ask a Drexel Physician: Five Things to Know About Seasonal Allergies

Seasonal allergies are one of the most common medical problems in America, with around 20 percent of people affected. That means that if you do not personally have allergies, chances are a close relative or friend of yours does have them. 

Leaders at Agreement Signing

'Dream Teams' of Pediatric Problem-Solvers Could Emerge From Drexel-CHOP-Hebrew University gathering

When researchers from Drexel, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Hebrew University of Jerusalem come together next week, leaders hope the result will be new research "dream teams" that can tackle pediatric problems in new ways.