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All In The News tagged "environmental engineering"

4 Reasons You Shouldn’t Trash Your Neck Gaiter Based on the New Mask Study

Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor of Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Aug. 12 Science News story about erroneous reporting around a new study that suggested the study indicated neck gaiters did not prevent aerosol spread of COVID-19. Haas was cited in a related story in Mic on Aug 13.

As Experts Argue About Coronavirus Face-Coverings, Here's What You Should Know

Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor of Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Aug. 12 Science News story about erroneous reporting around a new study that suggested the study indicated neck gaiters did not prevent aerosol spread of COVID-19. Haas was cited in a related story in Mic on Aug 13.

6 Feet Away Isn't Enough. Covid-19 Risk Involves Other Dimensions, Too

Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor of Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a May 22 Vox story about why the "6-foot rule" doesn't eliminate risk of COVID-19 transmission indoors. Haas' quote was also cited in a May 24 Vox story about more than 100 worshipers contracting the virus at a single church service in Germany. 

Do Houseplants Really Clean the Air? Yes — But There's One Thing You Should Know

Research by Michael Waring, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, andBryan Cummings, a doctoral student in the College, showing that houseplants do not contribute to improving indoor air quality, was featured in a Feb. 7 Inverse story.

Sorry, Your Houseplants Aren't Actually Purifying Your Apartment's Air

Research by Michael Waring, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, andBryan Cummings, a doctoral candidate in the College, showing that houseplants do not contribute to improving indoor air quality, was featured in a Feb. 3 Salon story.

Houseplants Don't Actually Clean Indoor Air as Much as You Thought

Michael Waring, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Nov. 18 Better Homes & Gardens story about his recent research finding that houseplants do not contribute to better indoor air quality.

Sorry, Your Houseplants Aren't Cleaning the Air in Your Home

Michael Waring, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Nov. 13 Well + Good post about his research that debunks the myth that potted plants can improve indoor air quality.

Opening A Window Will Improve Indoor Air Quicker Than Chic House Plants

Michael Waring, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in Nov. 8 stories in Forbes and Consumer Affairs about his research that indicates houseplants do not contribute to improving indoor air quality.

Houseplants Do Not Improve Indoor Air After All, Drexel Study Finds

Michael Waring, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was featured in Nov. 8 Philadelphia Inquirer, Philly VoiceAir Quality News and Medical Daily stories about his research on potted plants. Related stories also appeared on Nov. 7 in the Minnesota Post, Geek.com, Mental Floss and an MSN.com piece and was picked up by a number of television affiliates across the country. 

Calcium-munching Bacteria Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Road Salt Eating Away at Concrete Roads and Bridges

Research that looked at using a special type of bacteria to help prevent pothole formation caused by road salt, conducted by  Yaghoob Farnam, PhD Christopher Sales, PhD ; and  Caroline Schauer, PhD,  all from the College of Engineering, was featured in an April 4  Associated Press  story.

Can Bacteria Help us Prevent Salt Damage to Concrete Roads and Bridges?

A column in The Conversation authored by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about his research with colleagues Christopher Sales, PhD, and Caroline Schauer, PhD, on using a special type of bacteria to prevent pothole formation, was picked up by a number of outlets across the country on April 4, including Public Radio International, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Bozeman Daily Chronicle (Bozeman, Montana).

Calcium-Munching Bacteria Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Road Salt Eating Away at Concrete Roads and Bridges

Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, authored a piece for The Conversation on April 4 about his research with colleagues Caroline Schauer, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, also in the College, about using a special kind of bacterial to prevent road salt from forming potholes. The piece was picked up by WTOP-FM(Washington, D.C.) and The Register-Guard (Eugene, Oregon).