For a better experience, click the Compatibility Mode icon above to turn off Compatibility Mode, which is only for viewing older websites.

tags

All In The News tagged "Academy of Natural Sciences"

Philly’s Skyline To Get Dark at Midnight To Protect Migrating Birds

The Academy of Natural Sciences was noted in a March 31 Philadelphia Inquirer story for being among a number of organizations that initiated a program to dim the lights of Philadelphia's skyline to prevent millions of migrating birds that pass through twice a year from slamming into skyscrapers and crashing to the sidewalk. 

You Can Eat 17-Year Cicadas Emerging in Virginia

Isa Betancourt, curatorial assistant of entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, was quoted in a March 16 Food & Wine article about the edibility of Brood X cicadas and how the arthropods are considered a rare delicacy. The article was picked up by MSN Lifestyle on March 24.

Fact Check: Fake Warning Falsely Claims Hawks Can Carry Away Small Pets

Jason Weckstein, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences and associate curator of ornithology at the Academy of Natural Sciences, was quoted in a March 24 USA Today article about a viral Facebook post falsely claiming that hawks can carry off small dogs and cats.

Philly Likely To Miss Out on the Brood X Cicada Hype, but Chester, Bucks Counties Could Catch the Buzz

Jon GelhausPhD, curator of Entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences and professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a March 23 Philadelphia Inquirer article about millions of noisy Brood X cicadas that will emerge from 17 years underground and why Philly may just miss them.

The 17-Year Cicadas Are Returning To the East Coast This Summer—and Yes, You Can Eat Them

Isa Betancourt, curatorial assistant of entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, was quoted in a March 16 Food & Wine article about the edibility of Brood X cicadas and how the arthropods are considered a rare delicacy. The article was picked up by MSN Lifestyle on March 24.

Philly To Dim Lights To Make It Safer for Birds in Flight

Jason Weckstein, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences and associate curator of ornithology at the Academy of Natural Sciences, was quoted in a March 12 Associated Press article about dimming the lights of Philadelphia to prevent millions of migrating birds that pass through twice a year from slamming into skyscrapers and crashing to the sidewalk.

Billions of Cicadas Will Soon Take Over the Region: The Lineup

Jon GelhausPhD, curator of Entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences and professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was interviewed in a March 11 WCAU-TV (NBC-10) story about when Philadelphia will soon see billions of special cicadas that only emerge every 17 years.

Lights Out: Philly Skyscrapers Go Dark To Save Migrating Birds

Scott Cooper, PhD, president and CEO of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, was quoted in a March 11 Philadelphia Inquirer and KYW-Newsradio (1060-AM) stories about buildings around the city turning off their lights at night as part of a national initiative to protect birds from being blinded and crashing into buildings during migration.

Philly Skyline Will Go Mostly Dark at Night Starting April 1 in an Effort To Save Birds

Scott Cooper, PhD, president and CEO of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, was quoted in a March 11 Philadelphia Inquirer and KYW-Newsradio (1060-AM) stories about buildings around the city turning off their lights at night as part of a national initiative to protect birds from being blinded and crashing into buildings during migration.

Microplastics Found in Waterways Across PA, Including 7 in Allegheny County. Why It’s Dangerous and What You Should Know.

David Velinsky, PhD, vice president for Academy Science at the Academy of Natural Sciences and a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a March 10 PublicSource story about a new study that found 100% of sampled PA waterways were contaminated by microplastics.

A Surprise in a 50 Million-Year-Old Assassin Bug Fossil: Its Genitals

Katy Estes-Smargiassi, collections manager of invertebrate paleontology at the Academy of Natural Sciences was quoted in a Jan. 19 New York Times article about the fossilized jock strap of a 50-million-year-old assassin bug.

How You Can Help Stop Invasive Spotted Lanternflies

Computer vision technology being developed by researchers in the College of Engineering and Academy of Natural Sciences, to help identify invasive Spotted Lanternfly egg masses, was featured in a Dec. 24 Scientific American story. Maureen Tang, PhD, and Antonios Kontsos, PhD, of the College of Engineering, and Karen Verderame, of the Academy, were quoted in the piece.