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All News tagged "Archives"

The Students Army Training Corps (SATC) allowed men to both enlist in the military and enroll in college in the fall of 1918. This photograph shows Drexel's SATC unit gathered on the steps of the Main Building. Photo courtesy Drexel University Archives.

Dare to Lead: Drexel Army ROTC Celebrates 100 Years

Drexel’s ROTC program, now known as Task Force Dragon, is celebrating its centennial anniversary on Oct. 10.
The newly painted doorway of the Chestnut Street entrance of Main Building in 2018.

What’s New With Drexel’s Main Building?

Drexel University’s Main Building recently received a summer makeover.

James Galanos

Drexel Exhibit Pays Tribute to Design Integrity of Fashion Legend James Galanos 

The Robert and Penny Fox Historic Costume Collection (FHCC) of Drexel University’s Westphal College of Media Arts and Design will present a retrospective exhibition of work by renowned fashion designer James Galanos. The exhibition, James Galanos: Design Integrity (October 19-December 8, January 8-27 2019), will celebrate the artistry of James Galanos, considered by his peers to be one of the greatest and most creative of American designers of the 20th century.

The Drexel Dragon posing with the University's cheer squad in the 1990 yearbook. Photo courtesy University Archives.

Hidden Treasures: The 90-Year Evolution of the Drexel Dragon

Drexel University’s mascot has changed a lot through the years ­— from an engineer to a dragon to a dragon named Mario.
A Dragon wearing a witch costume in chemistry lab in 1979. Photo courtesy University Archives.

Drexel’s Ghosts of Halloween Past

In honor of Halloween, DrexelNow looks back on the ways that students celebrated the holiday decades and even a century ago.
Drexel's University Archivist Matthew Lyons.

Q&A: Matthew Lyons, Drexel's Newest University Archivist

University Archivist Matthew Lyons talked about what it was like joining Drexel University Libraries right in the middle of the University’s 125th anniversary year — and what he's doing to help preserve the present for Drexel's future.
A Drexel dragon holding a burger at the Dragon's Den in 1979. Photo courtesy University Archives.

When You Could Eat a Dragon Burger in the Dragon’s Den on Campus

Back in the day, the basement of today’s Creese Student Center was known as “the Dragon’s Den” and featured an arcade, fast food restaurant, game room and a bowling alley.
The Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry's men's basketball team with dragons on their uniforms in the 1929 Lexerd yearbook. Photo courtesy University Archives.

Beyond 1928, Here Be Drexel Dragons

For almost 90 years, the University has been represented by a “Drexel Dragon,” which got a name — Mario the Magnificent! — 20 years ago.
"Portrait of Anthony J. Drexel" (1860) by Josef Bergenthal, as it was hung in Anthony J. Drexel's house in 1893 (L) and in the President's Office in Main Building in 2017 (R).

Founder Anthony J. Drexel's Art on Campus — and at Home

Much of the art found on campus today used to hang in founder Anthony J. Drexel’s home, as he bequeathed much of his personal art collection to the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry upon his death.
A close-up of the face of the J. Peterson Ryder Memorial Clock.

Hidden Treasures: The J. Peterson Ryder Memorial Clock

The J. Peterson Ryder Memorial clock in the Great Court of Main Building represents more than just the time — or its inscribed motto, “Be on Time.”

Harold Myers pictured in 1984 with his family at the official naming ceremony of Myers Hall. Photo courtesy University Archives.

Remembering the Legacy of Drexel’s Myers Hall — and Harold M. Myers

Myers Hall, which has been on Drexel’s campus since 1977, was originally planned to be closed and later demolished at the end of this academic year. Now it will remain open — and continue to honor President Emeritus Harold Myers.
Isaac Asimov speaking at the 1976 Drexel University graduation ceremony. Drexel President William Hagerty, left of the podium, looks on. Photo courtesy University Archives.

‘The Drexel Jinx’ Broken Only by Isaac Asimov

During the 1970s, four consecutive speakers who spoke at Drexel University’s commencement were fired or resigned because of “The Drexel Jinx.” Only science fiction writer Isaac Asimov could break it.