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All News tagged "materials science"

microscopic MXene

Expanding the Use of Silicon in Batteries, By Preventing Electrodes From Expanding

Silicon anodes are generally viewed as the next development in lithium-ion battery technology. Silicon’s ability to absorb more charge translates to longer battery life and smaller batteries, if researchers can check the physical expansion of the silicon that comes with charging. Research from Drexel University and the Trinity College in Ireland, suggests that adding MXene ink to the silicon electrode-making process would do just that.
MXenes

Controlling What Goes on 'Between the Sheets' is Key to Optimizing MXenes' Abilities

New research from the College of Engineering shows how to customize the properties of materials called MXenes, which have displayed exceptional abilities to conduct electricity and block electromagnetic radiation.

 

playing cards

'Rippling' Under Pressure — From Playing Cards to Tectonic Plates, This is What Happens When Layered Materials are Pushed to the Brink

Looking deeper into the internal behavior of layered solids and formations— from graphene sheets, to wood laminates, to geological formations — researchers at Drexel University are gaining a better understanding of a buckling phenomenon that occurs within the layers of the materials as they are put under pressure.
capacitors

Addressing the Elephant in the Circuit — Finally, a Shrinkable Alternative for Capacitors

One of the last remaining unshrinkable obstacles blocking the progress of fully integrated, wearable technology is the clunky component that absorbs and disburses stray electricity and converts alternating current from a power source into the direct current used by most devices. Due to a meager selection of materials that can perform those diverse functions, these components — called electrolytic capacitors — tend to be a limiting factor when it comes to downsizing electronics. But a breakthrough by materials science and engineering researchers at Drexel University and Sungkyunkwan University in Korea could eventually replace them with a capacitor so thin and flexible that it’s literally painted on.
kidney dialysis patients

Standing in for a Kidney, MXene Materials Could Give Dialysis Patients the Freedom to Move

A type of two-dimensional layered material, created at Drexel University, has emerged as a candidate to assist in replacing the body’s waste filtration system in wearable kidneys.
MXene spray antenna

Drexel's Spray-On Antennas Could Be the Tech Connector of the Future

A group of researchers from the College of Engineering recently reported a method for spraying invisibly thin antennas, made from a type of two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene, that perform as well as those being used in mobile devices, wireless routers and portable transducers. 


ferroelectric domain wall material

Once a Performance Barrier, This Material Quirk Could Strengthen Our Telecommunication Connections

Researchers who study and manipulate the behavior of materials at the atomic level have discovered a way to make a thin material that enhances the flow of microwave energy. The advance, which could improve telecommunications, sheds new light on structural traits, generally viewed as static and a hindrance, that, when made to be dynamic, are actually key to the material’s special ability.
crystalsome

Drexel's Polymer Pill Proves it Can Deliver

Selecting the right packaging to get precious cargo from point A to point B can be a daunting task at the post office. For some time, scientists have wrestled with a similar set of questions when packaging medicine for delivery in the bloodstream: How much packing will keep it safe? Is it the right packing material? Is it too big? Is it too heavy? Researchers from Drexel University have developed a new type of container that seems to be the perfect fit for making the delivery.
MXene soft assembly

A Soft Solution to the Hard Problem of Energy Storage

Recently published research from Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania, shows a new technique for manipulating two-dimensional materials that allows them to be shaped into films of a practically usable thickness, while maintaining the properties that make them exceptional candidates for use in supercapacitor electrodes. 

 
  Back row, left to right: Dean Cohen, Amy Gottsegen, Kelly Weissberger (Associate Director, CSD), Ashleigh Jugan, Nicholas Barber, Vincent O’Leary, Provost Blake, Riki McDaniel, Ian Nichols, Caitlin Walczyk, Sam Buczek, Meredith Wooten (Director, CSD), Dean Van Bockstaele, Martha Meiers (Program Coordinator, CSD). Front row, left to right: Caitlin Cooper, Ana Monastero, Jacob Baron, Dylan O’Donoghue, Marina D’souza, Gabrielle Salib, Emily Coyle (Fellowships Advisor, CSD). Photo credit Jordan Stein.

Meet the Drexel Dragons up for the Biggest Awards This Year

Drexel University’s Center for Scholar Development recently hosted an event to recognize the hard work and initiative taken by those students who applied for major fellowships this year.
smoke detector

A High(er)-Definition Nose — Drexel's MXene Material Could Improve Sensors That Sniff

Sensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person’s breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best “chemical noses” even more sensitive.
hydrogen fuel

'Chemical Net' Could Be Key to Capturing Pure Hydrogen

Hydrogen is one of the most abundant elements on Earth and an exceptionally clean fuel source. While it is making its way into the fuel cells of electric cars, busses and heavy equipment, its widespread use is hampered by the expensive gas-separation process required to produce pure hydrogen. But that process could soon become more efficient and cost-effective thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers, led in the U.S. by Drexel University. The group has uncovered exceptionally efficient gas separation properties in a nanomaterial called MXene that could be incorporated into the membranes used to purify hydrogen.