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All In The News tagged "College of Engineering"

Why it's important to curtail methane leaks from natural gas production

Peter DeCarlo, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, authored a Dec. 6 opinion piece for the Allentown Morning Call about why it's important to curtail methane leaks from natural gas production.

What Is X-Ray Spectroscopy?

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Dec. 5 LiveScience story about x-ray spectroscopy technology and how it is currently being used for research and development.

Hairy Coating Keeps Nanoparticles Safe from Immune System, Liver

Research by Hao Cheng, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, and Christopher Li, PhD, a professor in the College, about the development of a polymer coating to help cancer-fighting nanoparticles make their way through the bloodstream, without being filtered out by the liver or targeted by the immune system, was featured in a Nov. 8 Medgadget post.

3D cell printing enables investigations into cervical tumour metastasis

Research by Wei Sun, PhD, Albert Soffa professor in the College of Engineering, that is using 3-D printed tumors to study the growth cervical cancer, was featured in an Oct. 24 Physics World story.

Lithium Sulfur Shows its Potential

Vibha Kalra, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Oct. 23Design News story about her work to develop a stable sulfur cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries.

Stabilising mat offers hope for commercialising lithium-sulfur batteries

Vibha Kalra, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Oct. 18 post on The Engineer (UK) about her research to develop a sulfur cathode that prevents performance degradation in lithium-sulfur batteries. 

Spray on Antennas to Connect Everyday Objects to the Internet

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was interviewed in an Oct. 9 BBC Radio “Click” segment about his research to develop spray-applied MXene antennas.

Sprayable Antennas Could Usher in a New Era of Ultracompact Wearable Devices

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, and Babak Anasori, PhD, a research assistant professor in the College, were quoted in a Sept. 27 Digital Trends story about their development of spray-applied MXene antennas. This research was also featured in a Sept. 28 Textile Evolutionstory.

Are Spray-On Antennas the Future of Wearables?

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Sept. 26 Smithsonian story about his research on spray-applied MXene antennas.

These Spray-on Antennas Could Be the Future of Communication

Kapil Dandekar, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in Sept. 26 posts on Communications of ACM and World Industrial Reporter about Drexel's spray-applied MXene antenna research. A related post by Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering; Babak Anasori, PhD, a research assistant professor in the College of Engineering; and Asia Sarycheva, a doctoral researcher in the College, which originally appeared in The Conversation, was picked up by Discover magazine on Sept. 26. 

Spray-on 'Invisibly Thin' Antennae Could Usher in a New Era of Ultra-slim Gadgets

Research from the College of Engineering on spray-applied MXene antennas, led by Yury Gogotsi, PhD; Kapil Dandekar, PhD; and Babak Anasori, PhD, was featured in Sept. 21 stories in the New Atlas, Daily Mail, IEEE Spectrum, Market Business News, The Engineer, Cosmos magazine, International Business Times, New Electronics, V3, Philly Voice, and a piece authored by Gogotsi, Anasori and doctoral researcher Asia Sarycheva for The Conversation was picked up by the Associated Press, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune and the Houston Chronicle.

Cloaking Nanoparticles From Liver Cells Lengthens Blood Circulation

Research by Hao Cheng, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering andChristopher Li, PhD, a professor in the College, about enabling nanoparticles to remain in the bloodstream longer to improve their use for cancer therapy, was highlighted in a Sept. 10 post onPhysics World.