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All In The News tagged "College of Engineering"

Drexel Researchers Made a More Efficient Energy-conductive Ink

Yury Gogotsi, PhD , Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, and  Babak Anasori, PhD , a research assistant professor in the College, were quoted in an April 22  Technically Philly  story about their work to develop a conductive MXene-based ink that can be used in inkjet printers to produce energy storage devices.

This Company Wants to Recycle Your Plastic Bags. There’s a Lot Riding on Whether It Succeeds

Grace Hsuan, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an April 22 WHYY.org story about a company that is working on a way to recycle plastic bags and other “flexible plastics.”

Bacteria the Main Ingredient in Potentially Pothole-Proof Concrete

Christopher Sales, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, was interviewed in an April 19 KYW-Newsradio (1060-AM) story about his research with collaborators in the College, Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, and Caroline Schauer, PhD, to study how a special type of bacteria could be used to prevent pothole formation in concrete infrastructure.

Researchers Have Developed an Energy Storage That You Can Print

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an April 18 Science Times story about his research with colleagues from Trinity College in Ireland that created ink for an inkjet printer from a highly conductive type of two-dimensional material called MXene. The team’s findings suggest that the ink can be used to print flexible energy storage components, such as supercapacitors, in any size or shape.

Environmentalists Question Pennsylvania’s New Methane Rule

Peter DeCarlo, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an April 10 Associated Press story about proposed legislation in Pennsylvania that focuses on reducing the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural gas operations as a way of reigning in the emission of greenhouse gasses, such as methane. The story was picked up by dozens of outlets across the U.S. and Canada, including The Washington Post.

Deicer Degradation: Not Possible Using Bacteria-Laden Concrete Cement

Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, both assistant professors in the College of Engineering, were quoted in an April 10 Science Times story about their collaborative research with Caroline Schauer, PhD, a professor and associate dean in the College, that looked at how a special type of bacteria could be used to preserve concrete infrastructure from deterioration caused by road salt.

How Bacteria Could Make Our Infrastructure Stronger

A column in The Conversation authored by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about his research with colleagues Christopher Sales, PhD, and Caroline Schauer, PhD, on using a special type of bacteria to prevent pothole formation, was picked up byFast Company on April 5.

Calcium-munching Bacteria Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Road Salt Eating Away at Concrete Roads and Bridges

Research that looked at using a special type of bacteria to help prevent pothole formation caused by road salt, conducted by  Yaghoob Farnam, PhD Christopher Sales, PhD ; and  Caroline Schauer, PhD,  all from the College of Engineering, was featured in an April 4  Associated Press  story.

Can Bacteria Help us Prevent Salt Damage to Concrete Roads and Bridges?

A column in The Conversation authored by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about his research with colleagues Christopher Sales, PhD, and Caroline Schauer, PhD, on using a special type of bacteria to prevent pothole formation, was picked up by a number of outlets across the country on April 4, including Public Radio International, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Bozeman Daily Chronicle (Bozeman, Montana).

Calcium-Munching Bacteria Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Road Salt Eating Away at Concrete Roads and Bridges

Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, authored a piece for The Conversation on April 4 about his research with colleagues Caroline Schauer, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, also in the College, about using a special kind of bacterial to prevent road salt from forming potholes. The piece was picked up by WTOP-FM(Washington, D.C.) and The Register-Guard (Eugene, Oregon).

Calcium-munching Bacteria Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Road Salt Eating Away at Concrete Roads and Bridges

Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, authored a piece for The Conversation on April 4 about his research with colleagues Carolyn Schauer, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, also in the College, about using a special kind of bacterial to prevent road salt from forming potholes. The piece was picked up by WTOP-FM (Washington, D.C.) and The Register-Guard (Eugene, Oregon).

Bacteria May Be the Key to Stopping Potholes from Forming

Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, and Christopher Sales, PhD, assistant professors in the College of Engineering, were featured in a WCAU-TV (NBC-10) newscast on April 1 about their research on how a special type of bacteria can be used to prevent potholes from forming in roads.