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All News tagged "marketing"

Nathan Chan and Mark Rao of Chengdu Famous Foods.

Chengdu Famous Food: Story of a Student-Run Restaurant

Here’s how two Drexel University students created, launched and sold a still-popular Sichuan restaurant, Chengdu Famous Food, and how the experience shaped their studies and their friendship.
Cell phone with grades showing

Business Experts Say FedEx and UPS Fight Over NRA Won't Win Over Public

A panel of business experts say the latest fight between FedEx and UPS over their relationship with the National Rifle Association (NRA) won’t help either company win over the public. FedEx has stated it will keep its discount for NRA members, breaking with other companies who eliminated such discounts after the Parkland School shooting. While UPS has never had a discount for NRA members, the company has said it will continue delivering NRA products.

photo credit, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Will People Eat Relish Made from ‘Waste’ Ingredients? Drexel Study Finds They May Even Prefer It
 

A new Drexel University study found strong potential for consumer acceptance of a new category of foods created from discarded ingredients.

Microsoft sign at the entrance of their Silicon Valley campus in Mountain View, California.

Business Experts Laud Microsoft for Its Reaction to Decision to End DACA

A poll asked a panel of business school professors to grade Microsoft’s reaction to President Trump’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals immigration policy. The company signed an open letter to Trump in support of DACA, urged Congress to settle DACA before moving to tax reform and vowed, " if Dreamers who are our employees are in court, we will be by their side."

bar graph of grads from left leaning, middle of road and right leaning panelists.

Experts: CEO of GE Justified in Cautioning Against U.S. Protectionism

General Electric CEO Jeff Immelt recently said “protectionism makes the U.S. look weak not strong,” in a speech recently delivered at Georgetown University, openly disagreeing with many of President Donald Trump’s policies. He continued to say that while the systems of free trade didn’t work well enough for all in the United States, withdrawing from trade deals isn’t the answer.

Image of Rajneesh Suri, professor at Drexel's LeBow College of Business, explaining the methodology behind the SEI study

SEI and Drexel University Partner to Explore Investors’ Visual Interaction with their Wealth

SEI and Drexel University announced the findings of an interactive usability study conducted to enhance the SEI Wealth PlatformSM (the Platform) end-client experience. Executed in the Behavioral Science Laboratory of Drexel’s LeBow College of Business as a Corporate and Executive Education project, the study employed brain imaging to measure cognitive functions while test subjects used the Platform’s consumer-facing wealth management portal. SEI established the core design tenets and principles, and worked with Drexel professors and research students to validate the design and ensure the experience was truly engaging for consumers.

A person using a ride-hailing service in New York

Trump Order Puts Lyft and Uber at Odds Professors Weigh In on What’s at Stake for Brands

A poll asked a panel of business school professors to grade Lyft and Uber, app-based, ride-hailing services, on their reactions to Donald Trump’s executive order barring visitors and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim countries to the United States. Lyft was quick to oppose the ban and donated $1 million to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) while Uber was more equivocal and continued to operate despite the publicized Taxi walkout.

Photo of a person searching on Google

What Do Google Search Queries Reveal About Brand Attitudes?

It has been widely thought that brand search volume — the counts of queries that a search engine receives from users that include specific brand names, like “iPhone” — can predict sales for that brand. Google makes this information available to marketers for free through Google Trends, an application that allows anyone to see how frequently popular brand names are searched, and it has become a valuable tool for marketers. But new research from Drexel University, Brigham Young University and Google shows there is a lot more to consider when looking at the large number of queries that include brand names.

vote button

Panel of Professors Gives UBER a Grade of ‘C’ for ‘Self-Serving’ Endorsement of Nevada Assemblyman

Drexel University’s Institute for Strategic Leadership in partnership with the American Marketing Association administered a Real Time Expert Poll © asking a panel of business school professors to grade Uber on its first ever endorsement of a political candidate. The panel gave Uber a “C” for its move to support the re-election of republican candidate Derek Armstrong with a mailer and an email campaign encouraging voters to “Uber” to polls and cast their vote for him. Armstrong has recently been under attack by the Nevada State Democratic Party, which claims that he does not support sufficient criminal background checks for Uber drivers.

Image of Bradley vs. Helvetica

The Game of Fonts: Research Finds That Difficult-to-Read Fonts Can Positively Affect Buying Habits

In a new paper, forthcoming in the Journal of the Academy of Science, a team of researchers including Drexel University’s Rajneesh Suri, PhD, a professor of marketing at the LeBow College of Business, take a closer look at how consumers’ buying decisions are influenced by fonts.
Screen shot of social media on smartphone

Will Social Media Kill Branding? Researchers Evaluate How Social Media has Transformed Traditional Marketing

For decades, corporations used a steadfast formula in branding a product: big advertising investments that produced customer awareness and built a positive product reputation. By investing heavily in and tightly managing a product’s image via controlled communications, dominant brands could be leveraged to cultivate loyalty and a long-term stream of profits. But social media’s meteoric rise in popularity may be killing the old, reliable branding formula and changing how consumers interact with brands.
The new course will provide students with a broad, interdisciplinary overview of critical, historical and practical issues pertaining to branding, marketing and consumerism.

New Drexel Course on Affluenza and Consumer Culture is Open to the Public

As the dust settles after the chaos of Black Friday, Cyber Monday and the holiday shopping season, it’s the perfect time to take a closer look at America’s consumer culture, including ‘affluenza,’ the epidemic of overconsumption. In a new course, called “Studying Consumerism,” offered by the Department of Communication in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, students—and a limited number of alumni and members of the general public—can do just that. The winter term course, which runs from Jan. 5 – March 21, will provide students with a broad overview of critical, historical and practical issues pertaining to consumerism as well as branding and marketing.