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All In The News tagged "Fast Company"

Anger and Frustration Can Jump-Start Creativity. Use These 3 Tricks to Channel It Productively

A 2016 study about art-making activating the brain’s reward pathway led by Girjia Kaimal, EdD, an associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was mentioned in a July 19 Fast Company article about methods to channel anger and frustration to jumpstart creativity. 

Surprising Study Finds That Creativity Is Not Actually Right Brain—It Is Left Brain

Recently published research led by John Kounios, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was mentioned in a April 1 Fast Company article about the study contradicting popular notions about which side of the brain controls creativity. According to Kounios’ study, creative brain activity shifts sides with the level of experience a person has at the creative activity at hand, such as jazz guitarists playing improvisations. 

Doodling at Work Could Help You be More Productive

Girija Kaimal, EdD, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was quoted in an Aug. 16 Fast Company story about the productivity benefits of doodling at work and in meetings. 

How Bacteria Could Make Our Infrastructure Stronger

A column in The Conversation authored by Yaghoob Farnam, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, about his research with colleagues Christopher Sales, PhD, and Caroline Schauer, PhD, on using a special type of bacteria to prevent pothole formation, was picked up byFast Company on April 5.

The Meaning Behind Neo-Nazi and Antifa Uniforms

George Ciccariello-Maher, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in an Aug. 24 Fast Company article about how alt-right and anti-fascist groups are using clothing to reflect political positions.

Science: Doodling Has Real Benefits For The Brain

Girija Kaimal, EdD, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, was quoted in a July 17 Fast Company Design article on her study into how doodling and other forms of art-making positively affect the brain’s reward pathway. The same day, an article covering the study was posted on HowardStern.com.

8 Apps That Can Fix All of Your Public Speaking Problems

Danish Dhamani, an undergraduate in the College of Engineering, and Parish Gupta, an undergraduate in the College of Computing & Informatics, were featured in a June 20 Fast Company story about their speech coaching app called Orai.

Learn How to Love Talking in Public (And Stop Saying 'Um' and 'Like') With This New App

Danish Dhamani, an undergraduate in the College of Engineering, and Parish Gupta, an undergraduate in the College of Computing & Informatics, were featured in a June 5 Fast Company story about their speech coaching app called Orai.

More Places to Buy Booze Means More Violence in Neighborhoods

A study from researchers in the Dornsife School of Public Health was profiled in a Jan. 27 Fast Company story. The study, led by Amy Auchincloss, PhD, an associate professor in the school, looked into the correlation between places where alcohol can be purchased and violence levels in Philadelphia.

At This Philadelphia Cafe, You Pay What You Want For A 3-Course Meal

General manager Donnell Jones-Craven, general manager of the upcoming Eat Café, a project of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was interviewed for an Oct. 7 FastCompany article on the upcoming restaurant.

Can You Design Innovation?

Drexel was mentioned in Fast Company’s “Co.Design” story on innovation districts on Aug. 17.

Watch These Micro-Robots Burrow Through The Body And Deliver Life-Saving Drugs

MinJun Kim, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a June 25 Fast Company post about his international, collaborative research efforts to develop an intravenous surgical tool, using his microswimmer robots, for operating on blocked arteries.