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All In The News tagged "Scientific American"

New Radioactivity Measurement Could Boost Precision of Dark Matter Experiments

Michelle Dolinski, PhD, an associate professor and associate dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in an article in the June issue of Scientific American about a new study showing scientists’ ability to spot tiny amounts of radioactive elements, which occur naturally in metals such as gold that are often used in laboratory instruments.

New Radioactivity Measurement Could Boost Precision of Dark Matter Experiments

Michelle Dolinski, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a May 18 Scientific American article about a new process to detect radioactive material in metals, which will benefit future dark matter experiments.

How You Can Help Stop Invasive Spotted Lanternflies

Computer vision technology being developed by researchers in the College of Engineering and Academy of Natural Sciences, to help identify invasive Spotted Lanternfly egg masses, was featured in a Dec. 24 Scientific American story. Maureen Tang, PhD, and Antonios Kontsos, PhD, of the College of Engineering, and Karen Verderame, of the Academy, were quoted in the piece. 

Coronavirus News Roundup: September 19–September 25

Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor of Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was mentioned in a Sept. 25 Scientific American post about guidance he put together with more than 50 indoor air quality experts and other scientists to help people understand how to protect themselves from COVID-19 aerosol transmission.

Chances of Avoiding Dementia on Rise in U.S.

A Kaiser Health story that quoted Laura Gitlin, PhD, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Professions, about increasing cognitive life expectancy was picked up May 24 by Scientific American.

Can You Battle Depression by Changing the Way You Think?

Arthur Nezu, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a May 19 US News & World Report story about how therapists can help depressive patients recognize and change their negative thoughts.

Trump's Order May Foul U.S. Drinking Water Supply

Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz Professor of Environmental Engineering and head of the Department of Civil Architectural and Environmental Engineering, was quoted in a March 10 Scientific American story about how President Trump's executive order on reexamining the Clean Water Act could affect U.S. drinking water.

Weak Immune Response in Women May Raise Autism Risk in Children

A Spectrum story on the link between weak immune systems in pregnant women and autism risk in their children that quoted Brian Lee, PhD, associate professor in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was published on Scientific American June 1.

Can You Trust a Eureka Moment?

John Kounios, PhD, professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was mentioned in a Scientific American article published online in advance of the May edition of the magazine. The piece covered his experiments testing the correctness of "Aha! moments" in problem-solving situations.

Race Is a Social Construct, Scientists Argue

Michael Yudell, PhD, associate professor and chair of Community Health and Prevention in the Dornsife School of Public Health, was featured in several publications for his opinion piece published in Science on the need to remove the race concept from human genetic research. Yudell was featured in a Pacific Standard story, a UPI wire story Feb. 4 and Christian Science Monitor on Feb. 8. A LiveScience story was published in Scientific American Feb. 5, the same day an article was featured in the Daily Mail. A podcast for Science was posted online Feb. 4

A Safe Drug to Boost Brainpower

Research from College of Medicine researchers examining the effects of “smart drugs” was mentioned in a Scientific American story on Feb. 11.

How Sugar and Fat Trick the Brain into Wanting More Food

Michael Lowe, PhD, a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a Scientific American article on Jan. 1 about eating and hunger. The story was also picked up by Salon.com