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All In The News tagged "ScienceNews org"

Cleaning Indoor Air May Prevent COVID-19’s Spread. But It’s Harder Than It Looks

Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor of Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a May 18 Science News story about the challenges of using ventilation and filtration to prevent COVID-19 transmission indoors.

4 Reasons You Shouldn’t Trash Your Neck Gaiter Based on the New Mask Study

Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor of Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, was quoted in an Aug. 12 Science News story about erroneous reporting around a new study that suggested the study indicated neck gaiters did not prevent aerosol spread of COVID-19. Haas was cited in a related story in Mic on Aug 13.

How Antibody Tests Work and Could Help Fight the Coronavirus

Charles B. Cairns, MD, Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg dean of the College of Medicine, was quoted in a March 27 Science News article about how antibody tests detect COVID-19 exposure and how they differ from diagnostic tests.

Endangered Green Sea Turtles May Be Making a Comeback in the U.S. Pacific

James Spotila, PhD, L. Drew Betz Chair Professor of BEES in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in an April 26 Science News article about how beleaguered populations of green sea turtles living in and around Hawaii and American Pacific island territories are increasing in number.

New Material will Make Chemical-Sniffing Sensors Even More Sensitive, Expanding Possibilities for Use

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in the College of Engineering, was quoted in a Dec. 10 Science News post about his research to apply a type of two-dimensional material, called MXene, as a component for improving chemical sensors.

A Brain Chemical Tied to Narcolepsy May Play a Role in Opioid Addiction

Rodrigo España, PhD, an assistant professor in the College of Medicine, was quoted in a June 27 Science News story about how hypocretin, a brain chemical that regulates wakefulness and arousal, may also be involved in addiction.

Genetically Modified Plant May Boost Supply of a Powerful Malaria Drug

Akhil Vaidya, PhD, professor in the College of Medicine, was quoted in an April 24 Science News story on a new genetically-modified plan that may bolster our supplies of anti-malarial drugs.

Genetically Modified Plant May Boost Supply of a Powerful Malaria Drug

Akhil Vaidya, PhD, a professor in the College of Medicine, was quoted in a Science News story commenting on a research study (which he was unaffiliated with) about a genetically modified plant that could boost the supply of a powerful malaria drug.

The Wiring for Walking Developed Long Before Fish Left the Sea

Ted Daeschler, PhD, vice president of Collections and the Library at the Academy of Natural Sciences and a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, was quoted in a Feb. 8 Science News story on a study looking into how ancient fish evolved the brain circuitry that led to walking on land.

Unknown Species Hide Among Texas Cave Crickets

Jason Weckstein, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences and associate curator of Ornithology in the Academy of Natural Sciences, was mentioned in a March 24 story in Science News about his study of cave-dwelling crickets.

Adults with Autism are Left to Navigate a Jarring World

Paul Shattuck, PhD, an associate professor in the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute and director of the research program area in life course outcomes, was quoted in a ScienceNews.org story on Feb. 10 about challenges facing adults with autism and the growing field of research to address their unmet needs.