For a better experience, click the Compatibility Mode icon above to turn off Compatibility Mode, which is only for viewing older websites.

Science & Technology

playing cards

'Rippling' Under Pressure — From Playing Cards to Tectonic Plates, This is What Happens When Layered Materials are Pushed to the Brink

Looking deeper into the internal behavior of layered solids and formations— from graphene sheets, to wood laminates, to geological formations — researchers at Drexel University are gaining a better understanding of a buckling phenomenon that occurs within the layers of the materials as they are put under pressure.
A group of students, teachers and family members pose for pictures at the Dec. 8 event at Drexel's ExCITe Center.

West Philadelphia Kids Become Philly Scientists With Drexel Biodiversity Project

A project led by the School of Education helped children from schools in Mantua, Powelton and West Philadelphia learn more about the biodiversity of their neighborhoods.
Nanoscale cell coating

Biomedical Engineer Receives NSF CAREER Award to Study Tissue Scarring

Lin Han, PhD, has received a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study fibrous tissues at the nanoscale, advancing the treatment and understanding of cartilage diseases.
"Nano Lord Voldemort" by Armin Vahid Mohammadi, Auburn University.

The Drexel Collection’s New Exhibit Highlights Art at the Nanoscale

Beautiful images of materials photographed at the microscopic level will be displayed in The Drexel Collection's new NanoArtography exhibit, which opens Dec. 14.
Drexel Blockchain

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Drexel Blockchain

Drexel students may not know much about the one-month-old club — or even that it exists — but here are some interesting facts that may make it hard not to attend the next general assembly meeting.

 



capacitors

Addressing the Elephant in the Circuit — Finally, a Shrinkable Alternative for Capacitors

One of the last remaining unshrinkable obstacles blocking the progress of fully integrated, wearable technology is the clunky component that absorbs and disburses stray electricity and converts alternating current from a power source into the direct current used by most devices. Due to a meager selection of materials that can perform those diverse functions, these components — called electrolytic capacitors — tend to be a limiting factor when it comes to downsizing electronics. But a breakthrough by materials science and engineering researchers at Drexel University and Sungkyunkwan University in Korea could eventually replace them with a capacitor so thin and flexible that it’s literally painted on.
Three young girls at a workshop

Survey Finds Daughters Can Thrive in Tech Even Without Tech Savvy Parents

As part Computer Science Education Week and the Hour of Code activities planned for this week, TechGirlz shared findings from a new survey of its program participants and their parents. Conducted in partnership with Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business, this marks the first time a survey has matched responses from girls and their parents in order to gain a deeper understanding of the role parents play in female engagement in technology.

ic@3401

ic@3401 is Here to Help Drexel Faculty and Staff Launch the Startups of Their Dreams

ic@3401, a startup incubator conveniently located on Drexel University’s University City Campus, is a valuable resource for Drexel faculty, postdocs and graduate students with entrepreneurial endeavors related to their research.
Hospital patient

Study Identifies the Sepsis Symptoms That Lead to Death

The data analysis, pulled from more than 200,000 hospital visits, could help clinicians to more quickly identify - and treat- the patients who are at the greatest risk of dying from the common, and often insidious, condition.
kidney dialysis patients

Standing in for a Kidney, MXene Materials Could Give Dialysis Patients the Freedom to Move

A type of two-dimensional layered material, created at Drexel University, has emerged as a candidate to assist in replacing the body’s waste filtration system in wearable kidneys.
brush and mushroom coating on nanoparticle

Molecular 'Mushrooms' and 'Brushes' Help Cancer-Fighting Nanoparticles Survive in the Bloodstream

For a number of innovative and life-saving medical treatments, from organ replacements and skin grafts to cancer therapy and surgery, success often depends on slipping past or fending off the body’s immune system. In a recent development, aimed at aiding cancer detection and treatment, Drexel University researchers might have found the ideal surface texture for helping microscopic, medical helpers to survive in the bloodstream without being screened out by the body’s natural defense mechanisms.
Brain stimulation

Would You Zap Your Brain to Improve Your Memory?

Drexel psychologists studied the public's attitudes toward brain stimulation.