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Health

PIER

Drexel Joins Regional Health Systems to Expand Access to Clinical Trials

The PIER Consortium™ will bring clinical trial sites to larger numbers of patients, while also bringing new treatments to market faster.
A screenshot of the Philadelphia Inquirer's Health section masthead from April 15, 2018.

Philadelphia Area Hospital Ads All ‘From the Same Playbook,’ Study Finds

Most advertisements for hospitals in the Philadelphia area emphasize patient stories and medical staff, a Drexel University study found, not really allowing for any to stand out.
Drexel’s 9th Annual Health & Wellness Fair.

CPR Training, Massages and Blood Pressure Tests: Photo Recap of Drexel’s 9th Annual Health & Wellness Fair

Drexel faculty and staff learned more about the variety of services offered through health and wellness vendors at the University’s annual event.
Full shelves with soda, fruit drinks and teas.

After Tax, Philadelphians 40 Percent Less Likely to Drink Soda Every Day

The first study to look at what Philadelphians actually drank instead of sales at local stores since the city's "Soda Tax" came into play, the study found that residents stopped drinking soda every day at a significant rate.
Laura Sherbondy and Paul Furtaw coordinated Drexel's first Fresh Check Day

Inaugural Fresh Check Day to Shed Light, Spark Action Around Student Mental Health

Staff coordinators aim to remind students to refuel, recharge and engage with classmates to safeguard their psychological well-being.
Photo of Tower Health President and CEO, Drexel College of Medicine Dean and Drexel President

Tower Health and Drexel Announce Plans to Develop Branch Medical School Campus

Tower Health and Drexel University have announced plans to jointly develop a branch medical school campus of Drexel University College of Medicine in West Reading near the campus of Reading Hospital, subject to the appropriate accreditation approvals. It is expected that upon approval of the regional accreditor, the branch campus will be operational for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Ticks

Drexel to Co-Host Lyme Disease Conference

To address gaps in Lyme disease diagnostics and treatment, College of Medicine microbiologists are bringing together researchers, physicians and patient advocates.

The stone side of an entrance to a city hall building, with a "City Hall" sign.

Mayors’ Political Leanings Strongly Influence Thoughts on City Health Policy Effectiveness

A new Drexel University study found that cities’ lead decision-makers view how effective municipal policies are at reducing health disparities differently based on their social ideologies.
A shot of a doctor in a white coat holding a clipboard and a pen. His face is cut off from the frame.

Food Insecurity Screening Works. We Just Need to Fix Social Stigma and the Referral Process

Screening for food insecurity is effective, a Drexel study found, but red tape and fears of being declared unfit parents often keep help from coming.
Logo for the ASPPH Harrison C. Spencer Award

Dornsife School of Public Health Wins Inaugural Harrison Spencer Community Service Award

The award recognizes the Dornsife School of Public Health for its extensive work in Philadelphia.
facebook

Just Putting it Out There — How #MeToo, Awareness Months and Facebook Are Helping Us Heal

If we have learned anything on social media in 2017 it’s that everything isn’t okay. Far from it. But we are finally starting to talk about it — according to researchers at Drexel University who study our relationships with social network sites. Their latest work, an examination of how and why women decide to disclose pregnancy loss on Facebook, sheds light on a shift in our social media behavior that is making it easier for people to come forward and share their painful, personal and often stigmatized stories.
smoke detector

A High(er)-Definition Nose — Drexel's MXene Material Could Improve Sensors That Sniff

Sensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person’s breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best “chemical noses” even more sensitive.