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Faculty Experts

Donald McEachron

Donald McEachron, PhD

Teaching Professor

School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

Contact:

donald.lynn.mceachron@drexel.edu

215.895.1382

McEachron studies biological rhythms and their effect on bodily processes and quality of life. He is an expert on circadian rhythms and biological responses to day-night cycles and natural light. He is currently helping to design a system of tunable LED lighting in senior living centers that will use changing light help to keep their biorhythms in sync and avoid problems related to Seasonal Affective Disorder. McEachron has commented in stories about Seasonal Affective Disorder and how sleep deprivation and erratic sleep schedules affect the academic performance of college students.
 

More information about McEachron

For news media inquiries, contact Lauren Ingeno at lmi28@drexel.edu, 215.895.2614 (office) or 610.717.2777 (cell).

 

In the News

  • Springing Forward Can Set Your Health Back, Studies Find

    Donald McEachron, PhD, a teaching professor in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, was interviewed for a March 12 KYW-Newsradio (1060-AM) story about how Daylight Saving Time can negatively affect your health.

  • Lighting Indoor Spaces in Senior Environments

    Donald McEachron, PhD, a teaching professor and coordinator of academic assessment and quality improvement in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, and Eugenia Ellis, PhD, an associate professor in the College of Engineering and Westphal College, were quoted in an April 20 Environments For Aging post about improving lighting in senior living environments.

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